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  LONDON 
 London Maps 

HAYWOOD, William & GASCOYNE, John. [A survey of the Tower of London in 1597]
A True and Exact Draught of the Tower Liberties survey'd in the year 1597 by Gulielmus Haiward and J. Gascoyne. London: Society of Antiquaries, 1742. 415 x 550mm. Blind stamp of the Hull Public Library in margin.
This survey of the Tower and its immediate environs, surveyed in 1597 to settle a dispute over jurisdiction between the Tower authorities and the City of London. As the monarch's property, the Tower of London always had the status of a 'Liberty', independent of both the City of London or the County of Middlesex. After the Dissolution of the Monasteries land outside the moat was added to Henry VIII's property, so that the 'Liberties of the Tower of London' included both Tower Hill and East Smithfield. On the 29th June 1595 trouble broke out on Tower Hill, with a crowd of over a thousand gathered to protest against an unpopular Major of London. When the Major sent the Tower Street Watch to Tower Hill to quell the disturbance, Sir Michael Blount, Lieutenant of the Tower, felt his authority was being undermined and turned out the Tower guards to repell the Major's men, which was done with force. The Tower Hill Riot is considered one of the most dangerous urban uprising of the century and the response was harsh, with Queen Elizabeth putting the City under martial law. The rioters were held to have crossed the line between riot and rebellion and five were hung, drawn and quartered on Tower Hill. This plan was commissioned by the Privy Council to determine the extent of the Tower Liberties, in order to clarify jurisdiction. Judging in the Tower's favour, they also increased the size of the garrison and recommended further fortification to secure the Tower from further unrest.
[Ref: 13194]    £680.00 ($917 • €770 rates)


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