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Records: 1 to 2 of 2
  LONDON 
 London Maps 

LONDON TRANSPORT. [A comprehensive (if not complete) collection of 59 Underground pocket maps 1925 - 1960]
[A set of folding card maps of London's UndergrounD.] London Transport 1925 - 1960. 59 colour-printed maps, smallest 125 x 150mm, largest 150 x 225mm. A little wear on a few leaflets.
A run of folding card pocket maps from the first use of the 'London Underground' slogan, through the introduction of Beck's icon 'electrical circuit diagram, to his last contribution published in 1960. The 'UndergrounD' card was designed by F.H. Stingemore (1890-1954). Issued in 1925, it removed all surface detail, including the Thames. His map went through 14 issues before it was replaced by Beck's masterpiece in 1933. Henry Charles Beck ('Harry', 1902-74) produced 38 before being forcibly 'retired' in 1959 (his last effort was published in March the following year), although there was a hiatus between 1938 and 1941. During this period seven cards were designed by 'Zero' (pseudonym of Hans Schleger) Although we are reasonably confident this is a complete run it is possible that an eagle-eyed connoisseur could find a variant edition GARLAND: Mr Beck's Underground Map.
[Ref: 16710]    £16,000.00 ($21,568 • €18,240 rates)


LONDON TRANSPORT. [Pre-war poster map of the environs of London showing the reach of London Transport]
All Routes. Road & Rail. London: Waterlow & Sons for London Transport, 1935. Chromolithograph, 1010 x 1260mm. Original folds.
A poster map of the environs of London, with the area covered by London Transport's trams, buses, coaches and trains printed in yellow. The extents are Windsor in the west, clockwise to Wendover, Luton, Letchworth, Bishops Stortford, Harlow, Brentwood, Gravesend, Sevonoaks, East Grinstead, Horsham, Guildford and Woking. The scale varies, larger at the centre than the border, allowing for greater detail in the centre of London. Of interest is the tiny 'Heathrow Aerodrome', then the private airfield of the Fairey Aviation Company. In 1944 the aerodrome was requisitioned under the 'Defence of the Realm Act 1914', with the excuse that the airfield was needed for long-range bombers: in reality the government wanted a new international airport and wanted to bypass both planning committees and compensation. A legal battle lasted until 1964.
[Ref: 14870]    £1,500.00 ($2,022 • €1,710 rates)


Records: 1 to 2 of 2