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  BOOKS 

SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [First Edition of the Nuremberg Chronicle, with a preserved panel from the original publisher's binding, and manuscript note in Schedel's own hand]
Liber chronicarum... Nuremberg: Anton Koberger, for Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermeister, 12th July 1493. FIRST EDITION. Imperial folio (449 x 309mm), 19th century full blind stamped morocco, gilt, gauffred edges & green watered silk doublures, with an inlaid panel of stamped brown stained pigskin from the original publisher's binding designed by Wohlgemut or Pleydenwurff; 326 leaves (of 328, without the final two blank leaves), foliated (20), I-CCLXVI, (6) CCLXVII-CCXCIX, (1). (with 55/6 blank, following the unfoliated Sarmatian supplement, ff. CCLVIIII- CCLXI blank except for printed headlines.) Types: 9:165G (headlines and headings), 15:110bG (text), 64 lines and headline, table and parts of text double column. 1809 woodcut illustrations printed from 646 blocks by Michael Wohlgemut, Wilhelm Pleydenwurff and workshop. The illustrations include 29 double page town views, 8 full page cuts and double page maps of the World and Europe by Hieronymus Münzer after Nicholas Khrypffs.
The Liber Chronicarum, or Nuremberg Chronicle, was the most extensively illustrated printed book of the fifteenth century, 646 woodcuts were used to illustrate the Chronicle, but many were used more than once, so there are a total of 1,809 illustrations. It was published the year that Columbus returned to Europe after discovering America, and the woodcuts were done by Michael Wohlgemut and his stepson Wilhelm Pleydenwurff, both of whom are mentioned, very unusually, in the colophon of the work. The young Albrecht Dürer, the publisher Kolberger's godson, was apprenticed to Wolgemut from 1486-1489 and some of the plates, particularly that of the Last Judgement, have been tentatively ascribed to him. The text consists of a year-by-year account of notable events in world history from the creation down to the year of publication. It is a mixture of fact and fantasy, recording events like the invention of printing, but also repeating stories from Herodotus. Even the world map is decorated with strange beings from the far reaches, including a cyclops and a four-eyed man. The panel from the original publisher's pigskin binding, designed for the 'Liber Chronicarum' and appearing on a number of recorded copies, depicts the tree of Jesse, the root of which issues from the sleeping Jesse and contains in its branches the genealogy of Christ. In addition mounted on the xylographic title is a clipped inscription in red ink in a later fifteenth century hand, stating 'the venerable Fr Georg Pinkheimer, prior of the Carthusians at Nuremberg, gave this book to Hartmann Schedel, doctor of medicine, on the Ides of August 1496'. Schedel was an enthusiastic book collector with a large library and the inscription appears to match his hand, however, it is clear that the inscription is taken from another book as it is unlikely that Pinkheimer would have given Schedel a copy of his own book. Hartmann Schedel, a Nuremberg doctor, humanist and author of the present work, ensured its lasting importance due to the attention to and inclusion of contemporary events. Therefore he included the invention of printing, Wycliffe's heresy, and explorations in Africa and the Atlantic. The publication of this book was an enormous undertaking, requiring five years of planning and a year and a half of printing. This process is well documented due to the survival of two maquette copies, the original contract between Kolberger and his partners (Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermeister), the contract between Kolberger and the artists and other archival material in the Nuremberg Stadtbibliothek. Provenance: Dr John Bellingham Inglis; by descent to Dr C. Inglis with his bookplate to front pastedown; sold at auction in London, 11th June 1900; George Dunn of Wooley Hall with his bookplate; Cornelius J. Hauck.
[Ref: 4609]    £85,000.00 ($110,500 • €97,750 rates)


  WORLD 
 World Maps 

SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [One of the earliest world maps available to the collector, decorated with bizarre creatures]
[World.] Nuremberg, Anton Koberger, 1493, Latin text edition. Woodcut, printed area 370 x 520mm, good margins.
A fine example of the famous incunable world map from the 'Nuremberg Chronicle', published a matter of months after Columbus' return to Spain after his first voyage to the New World, so including nothing of his discoveries. Instead, appropriately for a history of the world, it takes a retrospective view, with the cartography that of Ptolemy, with a land-locked Indian Ocean with the island of Taprobana, but given a biblical theme by depicting the three sons of Noah in the borders. Down the left are seven vignettes of mythological creatures, with a further 14 on the reverse, taken from the works of Herodotus, Solinus and Pliny. These include figures with six arms, four eyes or a bird-neck and a centaur. The text describes which parts of the world they inhabit. SHIRLEY: 19.
[Ref: 17465]    £14,500.00 ($18,850 • €16,675 rates)


  ASIA 
 The Holy Land 

SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [Incunable prospect of Jerusalem]
Destruccio Iherosolime. Nuremberg, Anton Koberger, 1493, Latin edition. Coloured woodcut, image 260 x 540mm, set in a page of text. A few small repairs to the centrefold, as usual.
An imaginary view of the Destruction of Jerusalem, with the Temple of Solomon on fire, from the famous 'Nuremberg Chronicle'. On verso are several more woodcut illustrations. LAOR: 1125, illus.
[Ref: 16824]    £1,600.00 ($2,080 • €1,840 rates)


 Turkey 

SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [Incunable prospect of Byzantium]
Bizantium. Augsburg, Johann Schönsperger, 1493. Latin text edition. Woodcut, printed area 180 x 170mm, set in a page of text.
An imaginary view of Byzantium, the Greek city that became Constantinople, then Istanbul when it was captured by the Ottoman Turks in 1453. Within the text are woodcut portraits of three Persian kings; on the reverse is a prospect of Bologna in Italy.
[Ref: 11384]    £400.00 ($520 • €460 rates)


  AFRICA 
 Northern Africa 

SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [Incunable Prospect of Dumyat]
Damiata. Augsburg, Johann Schönsperger, 1497. Latin text edition. Old mss. text highlighting. Woodcut, image 140 x 220mm, set in a page of text. Some restoration in margins.
An imaginary view of Dumyat (Damieta) on the coast of the Mediterranean, published in a small folio edition of the 'Nuremberg Chronicle'. Despite the eight editions (one possibly as late as 1604) fewer of these were printed than the Nuremberg original. A rare incunabule.
[Ref: 8973]    £150.00 ($195 • €173 rates)


SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [Incunable Prospect of Cairo]
Memphis vel Chairum. Augsburg, Johann Schönsperger, 1497. Latin text edition. Old mss. text highlighting. Woodcut, printed area 90 x 140mm, set in a page of text.
An imaginary view of Cairo, published in a small folio edition of the 'Nuremberg Chronicle'. Despite the eight editions (one possibly as late as 1604) fewer of these were printed than the Nuremberg original. A rare incunabule.
[Ref: 8977]    £125.00 ($163 • €144 rates)


SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [Incunable Prospect of Alexandria]
Alexandria. Augsburg, Johann Schönsperger, 1497. Latin text edition. Old mss. text highlighting. Woodcut, printed area 90 x 140mm, set in a page of text.
An imaginary view of Alexandria, published in a small folio edition of the 'Nuremberg Chronicle'. Despite the eight editions (one possibly as late as 1604) fewer of these were printed than the Nuremberg original. A rare incunabule.
[Ref: 8978]    £120.00 ($156 • €138 rates)


SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [An incunabule prospect of Dumyat in Egypt]
Damiata. Nuremberg, Anton Kolberger, 1493, German text edition. Woodcut, printed area 140 x 225mm, set in text.
Original antique print showing an imaginary view of Dumyat (Damieta) on the coast of the Mediterranean, published in the famous 'Nuremberg Chronicle'. Original print showing an imaginary view of Dumyat (Damieta) on the coast of the Mediterranean, published in the famous 'Nuremberg Chronicle'. Printed before 1500 it is classed as an incunabule.
[Ref: 9014]    £200.00 ($260 • €230 rates)


  BRITISH ISLES 
 England 

SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [Incunable view of 'England'.]
Anglia. Nuremberg, Anton Kolberger, 1493, Latin text edition. Woodcut, image 200 x 225mm, set in a page of text with contemporary rubrication.
A view representing England from the famous 'Nuremberg Chronicle', showing a hill-side city with a series of gates leading up to a citadel, one of two woodcuts used for England in the work. It is unlikely that there was an available prospect of London, so a generic town view was used. On the reverse is a similarly-fantastical view of Spain. SHIRLEY: 6a.2, "[the two woodcuts] are masterful examples of the medieval woodcutter's skill."
[Ref: 13445]    £450.00 ($585 • €518 rates)


  EUROPE 
 Northern Italy 

SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [Incunable Prospect of Bologna]
Bononia. Nuremberg, 1493, German text edition. Woodcut, image 200 x 230mm, set in a page of text.
An imaginary view of Bologna from the famous 'Nuremberg Chronicle'. On the verso are woodcuts of Byzantium and three Persian kings.
[Ref: 8948]    £240.00 ($312 • €276 rates)


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