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Records: 1 to 10 of 11
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  AMERICA 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. Tabula Terre Nove. Strassburg, Johannes Shott, 1513. Woodcut, printed area 385 x 445mm, paper watermarked with a fleur de lis, with good margins.
The rare first issue of Wäldseemüller's famous 'Admiral's map', the first printed atlas map specifically of the Americas. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. The twenty place names in North America suggest his sources were Portuguese, particularly the Cantino chart of 1502 and Caveri of c.1505. As the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida Peninsula appear before recorded voyages to either, this map is regarded as evidence of forgotten expeditions. It was Wäldseemüller's wall map of the world map (1507) that first used the name 'America', although he was only using it for the parts of South America explored by Amerigo Vespucci. However others started using the name for the whole of the New World and here Wäldseemüller is trying to make amends: a Latin note reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. This is the best example of this landmark map we have ever seen. BURDEN: 3.
[Ref: 17346]   P.O.A.


WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The Fries version of Wäldseemüller's 'Admiral's map' of the Americas]
[Tabula Terræ Novæ .] Vienne: Michael Servetus, 1541. Woodcut, printed area 285 x 430mm.
One of the earliest obtainable maps to show the New World, this example being the fourth and last issue of the Fries reduction of Wäldseemüller's famous map, which is the first printed atlas map devoted to the Americas and said to have been compiled with the assistance of Columbus himself. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. In his version Fries added a Spanish flag over Cuba and a vignette scene in South America depicting cannibals and an opossum, both reported by Vespucci. It was Wäldseemüller's world map of 1507 that first used the name 'America', placing in southern South America, after Vespucci, who explored that region and proved it was not part of Asia. When the name began to be used for the entire landmass Wäldseemüller used this map to emphasise Columbus's importance: a Latin text above 'Terra Nova' reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. This map was originally intended not for an edition of Ptolemy but for a new 'Chronica mundi' being written by Wäldseemüller: his death c.1520 caused the project to be shelved, so the woodcuts were used to publish a smaller sized and so cheaper edition of the 'Geography'. The title, as above, is on the reverse within a plain border. BURDEN: 4.
[Ref: 17900]    £9,750.00 ($13,143 • €11,115 rates)


  ASIA 
 China 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The first map of China printed in Europe]
[Tabula Superioris Indiae & Tartariae maioris.] Vienne: Gaspar Trechsel, 1541. Woodcut, trapezoid, printed area (at most) 290 x 460mm. Small spot in map area, small repairs in centre fold, repaired worm hole in border of map but affecting printed text.
A very important map of China, the first 'modern' map of the region, which includes Tibet, Tartary and Japan. Although it was published in an edition of Ptolemy's 'Geographia', it was not a deduction of a map from the Wäldseemüller editions of 1513, but a new one prepared for a new 'Chronica mundi' being written by Wäldseemüller. First published in 1522, this example comes from the last edition. He expanded the Ptolemaic map by adding information on Tartary and Japan gleaned from the accounts of Marco Polo. Japan is a large island called Zipangri, a name derived from the Chinese 'Land of the Rising Sun', which Polo learned about from the Chinese. The first recorded European visit to Japan was the year after publication, the landing of the Portuguese Alvarado in Okinawa, 1542. The title, as above, is on the reverse, with a descriptive text in Latin. MAPFORUM.COM 8; WALTER 'Japan, A Cartographic Vision', No.3.
[Ref: 17911]    £5,000.00 ($6,740 • €5,700 rates)


 Central Asia 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The Fries map of South Asia]
Indiæ Tabula Moderna. Vienne, Gaspar Trechsel, 1541. Woodcut, printed area 320 x 440mm.
Southern Asia, with Eastern Arabia and the Persian Gulf to the South China Sea. Of interest is the transferral of Taprobana to the coast of the Malay Peninsula, and the appearance of Indo-China as a tiny peninsula marked 'fulicandora'. Over India is a depiction of 'suttee', Hindu widow-burning; however Fries has added a horned devil to add to the titillation. This is the last issue of Fries' reduction of Wäldseemüller's map of 1513, prepared not for a Ptolemy edition but for a new 'Chronica mundi' being written by Wäldseemüller. His death c.1520 caused the project to be shelved, so the woodcuts were used to publish a smaller sized and so cheaper edition of the 'Geography'. TIBBETTS: Arabia in Early Maps, 17.
[Ref: 17910]    £2,100.00 ($2,831 • €2,394 rates)


 Turkey 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The 16th Century Wäldseemüller/Fries map of 'Modern' Turkey]
Tabu. Nova Asiae Mi. Lyon, 1535. Coloured woodcut, printed area 300 x 380mm.
The Fries reduction of Wäldseemüller's map of 'modern' Turkey, including Cyprus. Originally intended not for a Ptolemy edition but for a new 'Chronica mundi' being written by Wäldseemüller, his death c.1520 caused the project to be shelved, so the reduced woodcuts were used to publish a smaller sized and so cheaper edition of the 'Geography'. On verso is a text surrounded by woodcut columnar decorations.
[Ref: 16996]    £950.00 ($1,281 • €1,083 rates)


 The Caucasus 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [Ptolemaic Map of the Caucasus]
[Tabula III Asiae.] Lyons: M. & G. Treschel, 1535. Coloured woodcut, printed area 335 x 420mm. Some restoration at centrefold.
The Fries reduction of Wäldseemüller's map of the Caucasus, with the title on verso. Originally intended not for a Ptolemy edition but for a new 'Chronica mundi' being written by Wäldseemüller, his death c.1520 caused the project to be shelved, so the reduced woodcuts were used to publish a smaller sized and so cheaper edition of the 'Geography'. On verso is a text surrounded by woodcut columnar decorations and another woodcut with numerous scenes including a woman sitting beside a tree with hanging body parts.
[Ref: 9883]    £700.00 ($944 • €798 rates)


  BRITISH ISLES 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [16th Century Ptolemaic Map of the British Isles]
[Europae Tabula prima continet insulam Albion, sive Britanniam & Hyberniam.] Vienne, Gaspar Treschel, 1541. Woodcut, printed area 300 x 440mm. A very fine, crisp example.
From the last woodcut edition of Ptolemy, using the blocks cut in 1522. The British Isles, set in a trapezoid frame, famous for the east-west orientation of Scotland. The title (as above) is printed on verso, with a Latin text description. SHIRLEY: British Isles 30.
[Ref: 11019]    £1,900.00 ($2,561 • €2,166 rates)


  EUROPE 
 Scandinavia 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [Early 16th century map of Scandinavia]
Tabula Moderna Norbegie Et Gottie. Strasbourg: Johannes Schott, 1520. Woodcut, printed area 320 x 590mm.
This scarce woodcut map of Scandinavia appeared in the supplemental section of modern maps in the "Geographiæ Opus Novissima...", and is a copy of the Ulm map of 1482. Cities marked include "Asto" (Oslo), "Begensis" (Bergen), "Nodrosia" (Nidaros) and "Stauargerensis" (Stavanger). This map was first printed in 1513: this example dates from 1520, with all but one of the lines of letterpress text in the borders removed. GINSBERG: Printed Maps of Scandinavia & the Arctic, 5.
[Ref: 10605]    £11,000.00 ($14,828 • €12,540 rates)


WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [Early woodcut map of Scandinavia]
Norbegia et Gottia. Lyons: Melchor & Gaspar Treschel, 1535. Woodcut, printed area 340 x 450mm.
A very fine example of the Fries issue of Wäldseemüller's 'modern' map of Scandinavia, in turn a faithful copy of the first map of the region printed in Ulm in 1482. Norway, Sweden and Iceland are virtually unrecognisable; at the top, east of Iceland, is Greenland, connected by a narrow isthmus to the rest of Scandinavia. The rest of Europe follows the Ptolemaic format. The title is on a bandarole above the map; the text on the right edge of the map describes the lenghening hours of daylight as a traveller moves north. Originally intended not for a Ptolemy edition but for a new 'Chronica mundi' being written by Wäldseemüller, his death c.1520 caused the project to be shelved, so the woodcuts were used to publish a smaller sized and so cheaper edition of the 'Geography'. The editior of this edition was Michael Servetus, who was burned at the stake for heresy in 1553; John Calvin ordered that copies of the 'Geography' should be burnt with him.
[Ref: 14215]    £2,500.00 ($3,370 • €2,850 rates)


 Greece 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [Greece and the Balkans]
[TA: Moder: Bossinae, Serviae, Graeciae et Sclavoniae.] Lyon: M. & G. Treschel, 1535. Woodcut, coloured, printed area 320 x 400mm. Centrefold reinforced on verso.
An example of the Fries reduction of Wäldseemüller's modern map of Greece and the Balkans. Originally intended not for a Ptolemy edition but for a new "Chronica mundi" being written by Wäldseemüller, his death c.1520 caused the project to be shelved, so the woodcuts were used to publish a smaller sized and therefore cheaper edition of the 'Geography'. On verso is a text surrounded by woodcut column decorations. ZACHARAKIS: 1830.
[Ref: 9890]    £1,000.00 ($1,348 • €1,140 rates)


Records: 1 to 10 of 11
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