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  GLOBES 

WYLD, James. [An English mid-Victorian table globe]
A Terrestrial Globe Compiled from the latest & Most Authentic Sources, Including all the recent Geographical Discoveries. London, c.1870. Printed globe, 12" diameter (305mm), on three-legged, wooden stand, brass meridian and horizon with engraved paper calendar and zodiac, total height 18" (460mm), A few small signs of wear.
A fine table globe, marking James Clark Ross's discoveries in Antarctica (1841), 'The United States of Colombia' (1861-88) and Alaska as part of the United States (1867).
[Ref: 17297]    £7,000.00 including VAT ($9,310 • €7,861 rates)


BETTS, John. [A collapsible globe]
Betts's Portable Terrestrial Globe Compiled from the Latest and Best Authorities. British Empire coloured red. London, George Philip & Son Ltd, & Liverpool, Philip Son & Nephew, c.1925. Printed waxed cotton globe with 'umbrella ' mechanism, metal spindle and hanging ring. Globe circumference 1,260mm extended, 770mm long including spindle. With the original cardboard tube with printed cover. Some faint staining.
An unusual collapsible globe, made spherical by pushing a metal tube upwards along the spindle, It shows the British Empire covering approximately a quarter of the Earth's total land area, with a population of 450 million people. The globe's mechanism was invented by John Betts in 1860; this example is a later issue by G. Philip & Sons who manufactured them after Bett's death c. 1863 to c. 1925. We have estimated the date of this example by the description of St Petersburg as 'Petrograd (Leningrad)' (renamed by the Soviets in 1924), and the separation of Transjordan from Palestine (1922) but before full independence from the British (1928). Undoubtedly the reason for the superb condition of this globe is the original cardboard tube.
[Ref: 16071]    £2,250.00 including VAT ($2,993 • €2,527 rates)


TRIPENSEE PLANETARIUM COMPANY. [A 1930s model of the Earth's rotation around the Sun]
[Tellurian.] Saginaw, Michigan, c.1930. Tellurian, with Bakelite Sun, arm and base (with iron weight), Earth with paper gores, wooden Moon and Venus, chain mechanism, compass on arm. Earth, Moon and Venus with signs of wear.
A tellurian, an instrument that demonstrates the movement of the Earth around the Sun, how the seasons result from the tilt of the earth, and how the Earth's rotation on its axis cause night and day. The movements of the Moon and Venus also feature in the mechanism.
[Ref: 16927]    £2,200.00 including VAT ($2,926 • €2,471 rates)


SUMIRA, Sylvia. The Art and History of Globes. A profusely-illustrated guide to old globes New.
A well-written guide to globes, with detailed descriptions of examples from 1492 to the end of the nineteenth century.
[Ref: 14996]    £30.00 including VAT ($40 • €34 rates)


  WORLD 
 World & Continent Sets 

CLOPPENBURG, Johannes. [The World and Continents from Cloppenburg's 'Atlas Minor']
Typus Orbis Terrarum; America noviter delineata; Asia; Nova Europae Descriptio; Africæ nova Tabula. Amsterdam, 1632, Latin text edition. Coloured. Five plates, Each c.190 x 260mm. Worm hole in right edge filled on all plates, otherwise a very fine set with dark impression.
Scarce miniature versions of maps of the world and four continents by Jodocus Hondius. They appeared in Cloppenburg's edition of Mercator's 'Atlas Minor', with maps engraved in slightly larger format than standard Dutch pocket atalses by Pieter van den Keere. The borders of the continents are unillustrated, but the world has the Four Elements represented by a cornucopia, bird of paradise, salamander and a sea monster in the corners, two scenes from the Garden of Eden in the upper cusp and the Last Judgement below. First published in 1630, there was a third edition in 1636 before a hiatus until an edition in 1673, suggesting the plates were supressed. BURDEN: 225, first state of three.
[Ref: 17985]    £3,750.00 ($4,988 • €4,211 rates)


 World Maps 

Anonymous. [Medieval woodblock T-O world map]
[Untitled circular world map from a woodblock of 1491.] Paris, Nicolas Couteau, 1543. Woodblock, two sheets joined. Circular map, diameter 300mm, letterpress in borders. A fine example.
A scarce circular woodblock world map, first issued in the 1491 edition of 'La Mer des Hystoires', published in Lyon. It follows the T-O format with east at the top of the map, so Asia filling the top half, Africa bottom right and Europe bottom left, with Jerusalem at the centre. The map shows different countries and cities as hills or islands, with the Pope shown behind the walls of the Vatican and England and Ireland on the edge just left of the centre. Other vignettes include the Devil, the Tree of the Sun and the Moon, dragons and a phoenix. 'La Mer des Hystoires' was a French translation of the ' Rudimentum Novitiorum', 1475, an encyclopaedic world history based on medieval theology, which contained the first detailed maps ever printed, pre-dating the illustrated editions of Ptolemy. Although this map is smaller than the 1475 original a number of mistakes were corrected and the text is much clearer than in the previous editions. Campbell calls it 'the work of a thinking individual'. SHIRLEY: Mapping of the World, 17.
[Ref: 10204]    £16,500.00 ($21,945 • €18,530 rates)


LUFFT, Hans. [A Bohemian edition of Lufft's 'Daniel's Dream' world map with fantastical creatures]
[World map illustrating Daniel's Dream.] Prague: Jiri Melantrich, c.1549, Czech text edition. Woodcut 115 x 160mm, with extra woodcut borders and letterpress text underneath. Repaired tear entering text at bottom.
A most unusual world map, designed to illustrate a commentary on Daniel's apocalyptic dream from the Old Testament, which the authors, Justus Jonas and Philipp Melanchthon (with help from their friend Martin Luther), saw as an allegory for the victory of the Christian world over Ottoman Empire, and were using as propaganda for a holy war. The map depicts the three continents of the old world, their names the only writing on the map. Of more importance are the four fabulous beasts representing empires, as described in Chapter Seven of the Book of Daniel: a lion with eagle’s wings (Babylon or Assyria); a bear (Persia); a leopard with four wings and four heads (the Macedon of Alexander); and a goat with iron teeth and ten horns, including one small horn on which is a human head (Western Roman Empire with the small horn representing the Ottomans). Also in Asia is an army, mounted on horses, wearing turbans and carrying lances, representing the threat of the Turkish army. Originally published in Wittenburg by Lufft in 1530, this example comes from a second version, believed to have been cut by either Melchior Schwarzenberg or Moritz Schreiber (the monogram 'MS' is on other blocks), also in use from 1530. Ernst Gallner (www.daniels-dream-map.com) lists four editions of a Czech bible with this state of the block by the same publisher: 1549, 1558, 1561 & 1566. See SHIRLEY 65a, this version not illustrated; www.daniels-dream-map.com, version 2, state 1.
[Ref: 13741]    £2,000.00 ($2,660 • €2,246 rates)


FRISIUS, Gemma. [An uncommon cordiform world map with wind heads]
Mappa mundi, oft generael Carte der Werelt... Antwerp, c.1553. Woodcut, sheet 230 x 295mm. Narrow margins, repair in bottom margin.
An unusual woodcut world map, prepared by Frisius for inclusion in Peter Apian's Cosmography. Three very similar versions of the block have been identified: this is the second, used 1553-1584, but this edition is Dutch, so is either 1553, 1561 or 1564. North America is shown as a narrow peninsula named 'Baccalearum', a reference to the cod fishing that was already so important. In the seas, ships, seamonsters and a mermaid are shown. The border of the map contains the signs of the Zodiac, outside which are a number of wind-heads, including three skulls blowing from the south. Above the two maps are a pair of god-like figures, one of whom has the double-headed eagle of the Holy Roman Emperor on his breastplate. SHIRLEY: 82 (see 96 & 131 for further details).
[Ref: 17820]    £2,400.00 ($3,192 • €2,695 rates)


BÜNTING, Heinrich. [Bünting's famous clover leaf map of the world]
Die ganze Welt in ein Kleberblat... Magdeburg, 1581-. Woodcut, printed area 270 x 380mm. A fine, dark printing.
Bünting's famous clover leaf map, showing Europe, Asia and Africa as separate leaves connected to Jerusalem at the centre. England and Scandinavia appear as islands at the top of the map; the New World fills the bottom left corner. The map was published in Bünting's 'Itinerarium Sacræ Scripturæ' (Travel through Holy Scripture), a reworking of the bible as a travel guide. Also included were maps of Europe as a Virgin Queen and Asia as Pegasus. This design was of particular relevance to Bünting because a clover leaf features on the arms of his hometown of Hanover. SHIRLEY: World 142.
[Ref: 17369]    £6,500.00 ($8,645 • €7,300 rates)


MERCATOR, Gerard. [The most decorative Ptolemaic world map]
Universalis Tabula Iuxta Ptolemæum. Amsterdam: Jodocus Hondius Jnr, 1618. Fine original colour. 350 x 490mm.
A map of the world according to Claudius Ptolemy of Alexandria, showing the world as known to the ancients, with the semi-mythical island of Taprobana but no America or Cape of Good Hope. However Mercator has dropped the land-locked Indian Ocean shown on earlier Ptolemaic maps. The map was engraved by Mercator himself for his 1578 edition of Ptolemy's 'Geography'; however this example comes from an edition of Petrus Bertius's 'Theatrum geographiae veteris'. The flamboyance of the strapwork-and-windhead borders makes this map the most decorative of the Ptolemaic world maps. SHIRLEY: World 139, plate 118, 'His general Ptolemaic map is one of the finest available... elegantly engraved'.
[Ref: 16747]    £7,500.00 ($9,975 • €8,423 rates)


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