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  BOOKS 

PIRANESI, Giovanni Battista. [The rare first edition of Piranesi's study of the antiquities of Rome]
Le Antichità Romane. Rome: Bouchard & Gravier, 1756-7. 4 vols, large folio, contemporary full calf, gilt decorated in compartments, black calf title & volume labels on spines, marbled edges and endpapers. Vol I: pp. [xi]+40+xi+iii+iv+iii+[ii], engraved frontis portrait and 44 numbered plates (6 double-page, one two-sheet map, 7 single page, thirty pages with two plates), with 8 engravings in text. Vol II: pp. 63 numbered plates (one two-sheet folding plate, 46 double-page, 16 single page including title and list of plates. Vol III: 54 numbered plates (one two-sheet folding plate, 46 double-page and 10 single-page, including title). Vol IV: 57 numbered plates (five two-sheet folding, 24 double-page, 28 single page including title and index). Complete. Some spotting throughout.
A fine example of the first edition, second issue, of Piranesi's monumental survey of the antiquities of Rome, with which he established himself as the leading light of the archaeology of Rome. Having spent eight years recording artefacts and buildings, including the the extensive remains of sepulchres, he published this collection of of over two hundred plates. About half of the items he recorded are now lost. According to Piranesi himself only seventy copies of the first issue had been printed before he lost patience with his patron Viscount Charlemont's failure to send funds promised to underwrite the costs of publication. He removed the dedications to each volume, expunged Charlemont's name from the text and added the text of two letters he sent to the viscount demanding the promised funds (dated February 1757). He also has the first letter displayed in the Vatican, Barberini and Corsini Libraries in an attempt to embarrass Charlemont to pay, as an ink manuscript note to the letter printed here states. This footnote, composed by Piranesi and probably written by him, also appears in the British Library's example of the Antichità, so perhaps was an addition Piranesi made to every English customer's copies. Provenance: with the bookplate of Hugh, Duke of Westminster, dated 1884.
[Ref: 18074]    £92,500.00 ($128,668 • €105,728 rates)


PIRANESI, Giovanni Battista. [Piranesi's four-volume study of the antiquities of Rome]
Le Antichità Romane. Rome: Stamperia Salomoni, 1784. 4 vols, large folio, half morocco, gilt decorated in compartments, marbled boards, new endpapers. Vol I: pp. [ii]+40+xi+iii+iv+iii+[ii], engraved frontis. portrait and 44 numbered plates (6 double-page, one two-sheet map, 7 single page, thirty pages with two plates), with 8 engravings in text. Vol II: pp. 63 numbered plates (one two-sheet folding plate, 46 double-page, 16 single page including title and list of plates). Vol III: 54 numbered plates (one two-sheet folding plate, 46 double-page and 10 single-page, including title). Vol IV: 57 numbered plates (five two-sheet folding, 24 double-page, 28 single page including title and index) plus two un-numbered plates. Complete. A few plates age-toned.
Piranesi's monumental survey of the antiquities of Rome, with which he established himself as the leading light of the archaeology of Rome. Having spent eight years recording artefacts and buildings, including the the extensive remains of sepulchres, he published this collection of of over two hundred plates. About half of the items he recorded are now lost. Compared with the first edition there is one plate replaced, XLIV of volume IV, with the two unnumbered plates added after.
[Ref: 18096]    £58,000.00 ($80,678 • €66,294 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [The famous sociological survey of London]
Life and Labour of the People in London. First Series. [&] Second Series. [&] Third Series. [&] Final Volume. London: McMillan & Co., 1902. First edition of the complete work. 17 vols & map case, original parchment-papered boards, gilt-decorated spines, partially unopened; Series 1 with map case with five coloured folding Poverty maps, illustrated in text with graphs & tables; Series 2 illustrated in text with graphs & tables; Series 3 with 20 coloured folding maps (lettered A-U, although 'I' was not used) and sketch maps in text; 'Final Volume' with coloured folding map in rear pocket. Some spotting of text throughout.
A fine set of the three series that made up Booth's socio-economic survey of London, including his famous Poverty map which colour-coded streets according to the degree of wealth of the inhabitants, ranging from black ('Lowest class'), through shades of blue and purple ('Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable'), to red ('Well to do') and yellow ('Wealthy'). Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers (including his cousin Beatrix Potter) to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The First Series of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The Second Series (1891), covering the rest of the city, showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. The Third Series (1902) covered Religious Influences. The 'Final Volume' (also 1902) contained notes on social influences and Conclusions, with a map marking places of worship, public elementary schools and public houses.
[Ref: 15615]    £16,000.00 ($22,256 • €18,288 rates)


  WORLD 
 World Maps 

BARBIÉ DU BOCAGE, Jean Guillaume. [French double hemisphere world map]
Mappemonde en deux hemispheres dressee et dessinee sous la direction de Mr. J.G. Barbie du Bocage Paris, 1848. Original colour. 230 x 310mm.
Double hemisphere map of the world with the Americas in the right-hand hemisphere, by Jean-Guillaume Barbié du Bocage.
[Ref: 17320]    £190.00 ($264 • €217 rates)


MENETRIER, F. [A double-hemisphere wall map of the world illustrated with costumes]
Le Petit Journal. Mappemonde. Paris, c.1900. Colour-printed wood engraving. 940 x 1095mm. Minor repairs to folds.
A highly decorative map of the world, with a vignette scene from each continent in the corners and cusps, including an American paddle steamer, and eighty-one costumes from around the world in three rows. On the map the shipping routes are marked with sailing times, for example London to Australia and New Zealand in 45 days. As this map was published as a supplement to the French 'Petit Journal' the ephemeral nature of this map makes surviving examples very unusual.
[Ref: 16005]    £3,500.00 ($4,869 • €4,001 rates)


GROSS, Alexander. [The British Empire at its height]
Commercial & Political Map of the World on Mercator's Projection. The British Empire Coloured prominently in Red. London: Geographia Ltd, c.1920. Colour lithograph, printed area 950 x 1460mm, dissected and laid on linen as issued.
A large map of the world, published just after the end of the First World War, when the British Empire was at its peak. Insets show gains by the British from the Germans in Australasia, Africa and the Near East (including Iraq), details of the Suez and Panama canals. Born in Hungary as Sandor Grosz, Gross came to London, founding the map publishing company Geographia Ltd in 1911 before emigrating to the US around 1930. His daughter, Phyllis Pearsall, walked the 23,000 streets of London in the 1930s and compiled London's first A-Z.
[Ref: 18297]    £1,400.00 ($1,947 • €1,600 rates)


BUREAU OF NAVAL PERSONNEL. [Double-sided poster map of the Europe and Pacific Theatres of WW2]
Nav War Map No 3. World War 2 in the North Sea Area. [&] Nav War Map No 4. The North Pacific Area. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1944. Colour lithograph, printed on both sides. Sheet 1010 x 1080mm. Repairs to folds.
Two colourful propaganda maps of two of the most areas of the American war effort in 1944, each giving a brief history of events. The first shows the North Atlantic and North Sea, published just prior to the Normandy landings, illustrates the hunt for the German battleship Bismark and the success of the Arctic convoys. A label over England reads 'The R.A.F. and the A.A.F. control the industrial heart of Europe from England, the world's most powerful air base', and streams of planes show the targets of bombing campaigns in Europe. The map on the reverse shows the Pacific theatre, with a timeline listing Japanese aggression from the taking of Formosa in 1895 to Pearl Harbour. The map shows the extent of the Japanese attacks on American bases and the American counter attacks, with diagrams underneath detailing the battles of Medway and Attu.
[Ref: 16657]    £1,400.00 ($1,947 • €1,600 rates)


 Polar Maps 

BLAEU, Johannes. [A map of the early exploration of the Arctic Circle]
Regiones sub Polo Arctico. Amsterdam, c.1645, French text edition. Fine original colour. 410 x 630mm.
The Arctic Circle, showing European attempts to find the North West and North East Passages. In Arctic America the preponderance of English names shows the importance of the English explorers in the region, trying to circumvent the Spanish control of routes to the East Indies. On Greenland the entrance to 'M. Forbischers Straet' is marked and in Arctic Russia the names are those given by the Dutch explorers such as Berentz. At the top of the map is a title cartouche depicting wind-heads, a European explorer with a brazier on his lap and a white cannibal, and a scale cartouche with hunters and a polar bear. The European is Henry Hudson, whose explorations in Hudson's Bay (which he called 'a labyrinth without end') ended in 1611 when he was forced into a small boat and cast adrift by a mutinous crew. He was never seen again and it is assumed that his crew would have turned to eating each other to survive. This is an example of the second state of the map, with the dedication added c.1645. It is a direct copy of Jansson's map, but it is interesting that the engraver copied the Baltic Sea's name but not the coastline! BURDEN: 252.
[Ref: 18265]    £1,100.00 ($1,530 • €1,257 rates)


  AMERICA 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The first atlas map devoted to America]
Tabula Terre Nove. Strassburg, Johannes Shott, 1513. Woodcut, printed area 385 x 445mm, paper watermarked with a fleur de lis, with good margins.
The rare first issue of Wäldseemüller's famous 'Admiral's map', the first printed atlas map specifically of the Americas. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. The twenty place names in North America suggest his sources were Portuguese, particularly the Cantino chart of 1502 and Caveri of c.1505. As the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida Peninsula appear before recorded voyages to either, this map is regarded as evidence of forgotten expeditions. It was Wäldseemüller's wall map of the world (1507) that first used the name 'America', although he was only using it for the parts of South America explored by Amerigo Vespucci. However others started using the name for the whole of the New World and here Wäldseemüller is trying to make amends: a Latin note reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. This is the best example of this landmark map we have ever seen. BURDEN: 3.
[Ref: 17346]   P.O.A.


 North America 

Anonymous. [A map of North America after Cook's Third Voyage]
Amerique Septentrionale. Paris, c. 1785. Coloured. 200 x 225mm.
A small format map of North America showing the mapping of the Pacific coast by Captain Cook on his Third Voyage, but pre-dating Vancouver's discoveries of 1791-2.
[Ref: 17179]    £160.00 ($223 • €183 rates)


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