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  WORLD 
 World Maps 

FRISIUS, Gemma. [An uncommon cordiform world map with wind heads]
Mappa mundi, oft generael Carte der Werelt... Antwerp, c.1553. Woodcut, sheet 230 x 295mm. Narrow margins, repair in bottom margin.
An unusual woodcut world map, prepared by Frisius for inclusion in Peter Apian's Cosmography. Three very similar versions of the block have been identified: this is the second, used 1553-1584, but this edition is Dutch, so is either 1553, 1561 or 1564. North America is shown as a narrow peninsula named 'Baccalearum', a reference to the cod fishing that was already so important. In the seas, ships, seamonsters and a mermaid are shown. The border of the map contains the signs of the Zodiac, outside which are a number of wind-heads, including three skulls blowing from the south. Above the two maps are a pair of god-like figures, one of whom has the double-headed eagle of the Holy Roman Emperor on his breastplate. SHIRLEY: 82 (see 96 & 131 for further details).
[Ref: 17820]    £2,400.00 ($3,192 • €2,707 rates)


BÜNTING, Heinrich. [Bünting's famous clover leaf map of the world]
Die ganze Welt in ein Kleberblat... Magdeburg, 1581-. Woodcut, printed area 270 x 380mm. A fine, dark printing.
Bünting's famous clover leaf map, showing Europe, Asia and Africa as separate leaves connected to Jerusalem at the centre. England and Scandinavia appear as islands at the top of the map; the New World fills the bottom left corner. The map was published in Bünting's 'Itinerarium Sacræ Scripturæ' (Travel through Holy Scripture), a reworking of the bible as a travel guide. Also included were maps of Europe as a Virgin Queen and Asia as Pegasus. This design was of particular relevance to Bünting because a clover leaf features on the arms of his hometown of Hanover. SHIRLEY: World 142.
[Ref: 17369]    £6,500.00 ($8,645 • €7,332 rates)


MERCATOR, Gerard. [The most decorative Ptolemaic world map]
Universalis Tabula Iuxta Ptolemæum. Amsterdam: Jodocus Hondius Jnr, 1618. Fine original colour. 350 x 490mm.
A map of the world according to Claudius Ptolemy of Alexandria, showing the world as known to the ancients, with the semi-mythical island of Taprobana but no America or Cape of Good Hope. However Mercator has dropped the land-locked Indian Ocean shown on earlier Ptolemaic maps. The map was engraved by Mercator himself for his 1578 edition of Ptolemy's 'Geography'; however this example comes from an edition of Petrus Bertius's 'Theatrum geographiae veteris'. The flamboyance of the strapwork-and-windhead borders makes this map the most decorative of the Ptolemaic world maps. SHIRLEY: World 139, plate 118, 'His general Ptolemaic map is one of the finest available... elegantly engraved'.
[Ref: 16747]    £7,500.00 ($9,975 • €8,460 rates)


HONDIUS, Henricus. ['A fine ornate example of the decorative cartography of the time']
Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica Ac Hydrographica Tabula. Auct Henr. Hondio. Amsterdam, Jan Jansson, 1641-, Latin text edition. Fine original colour. 380 x 540mm. Minor repairs on verso to verdigris weaknesses.
A striking example of the first world map to appear in an atlas showing California as an island and, according to Schiller, 'the oldest dated map in an atlas on which a Dutch discovery in Australia has been shown'. The Cape York Peninsula is shown with eight names. The decoration on the map is superb: three strapwork cartouches appear on the map; portraits of Julius Cæsar, Ptolemy, Mercator and Jodocus Hondius fill the corners; scenes representing the four Elements are above and below each hemisphere ; in the upper cusp is a celestial globe; and in the lower cusp are allegorical figures representing Asia, America and Africa making obeisance to Europe. KOEMAN: 51A; SCHILDER: Australia Unveiled, 39; SHIRLEY: 336, 'a fine ornate example of the decorative cartography of the time'.
[Ref: 16889]    £14,000.00 ($18,620 • €15,792 rates)


VISSCHER, Claes Janszoon. [A world map with portraits of the Twelve Cæsars]
Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula. Amsterdam, 1652. Original colour. 445 x 560mm. Minor restoration to margin and centre fold.
This magnificent planisphere manages to include 30 separate illustrations in its panels. Along the top and bottom are equestrian portraits of the Twelve Cæsars of Tacitus. The four corners feature female allegorical figures of the Continents, with Europe as a shepherdess, Asia seated on a camel, Africa on a crocodile and America on an armadillo! The left border has prospects of Rome, Amsterdam, Jerusalem and Tunis, interspersed with illustrations of European, Asian and African dress. The right border is given over completely to America: the prospects of Mexico City, Havana, Pernambuco and Todos os Santos Bay are separated by vignettes of North American natives, South Americans and the giants of the Magellan Strait. Originally published in 1639, most of the cartography has been copied from Blaeu, although Arctic America has been extended, as has the St Lawrence River. This state has the date 1652, the year of Visscher's death, added. SHIRLEY: 350.
[Ref: 17720]    £20,000.00 ($26,600 • €22,560 rates)


DE WIT, Frederick. [A Dutch World map with superb decorative borders]
Nova Orbis Tabula in Lucem Edita. Amsterdam, 1675. Original colour. 465 x 540mm. Minor reinforcements to verdigris cracks on verso
An exquisite seventeenth century map of the world in double-hemisphere, with two further spheres showing the northern and southern hemispheres and cherubs in the cusps. The four corners are taken up with vignettes of the seasons, each with references to the Elements and the Zodiac. The first state of the map was issued c.1670, but the cherubs in the cusps and the engraved border mark this as the second state. Another plate replaced it in 1680. SHIRLEY: World 451 - ''one of the most attractive of its time... one of the finest that is relatively easily obtainable by the map collector'.
[Ref: 17451]    £6,000.00 ($7,980 • €6,768 rates)


SPEED, John. [Speed's world map, the first atlas map to show California as an island]
A New and Accurat Map of the World Drawne according to ye truest Descriptions, latest Discoveries & best obervations y.t have beene made by English or Strangers. 1651. London: Bassett & Chiswell, 1676. Coloured. 395 x 515mm. Lateral margins repaired, tips of bottom corners reinstated.
The double-hemisphere world map from Speed's 'Prospect of the Most Famous Parts of the World', the first English atlas of the world, first published in 1627. It was probably engraved by Abraham Goos, who signed most of the other maps in the atlas. It was the first atlas map to show California as an island, an idea Goos introduced to print with a map of North America in 1624. On the other side of the world this map also shows Korea as an island and depicts 'Beach', the mythical kingdom located on 'The Southerne Unknowne Land'. Around the rims of the double-hemispheres is an abundance of decoration, including celestial spheres in the cusps, allegorical figures of the Four Elements, portraits of circumnavigators and diagrams of eclipses. On verso is an interesting English-text 'Description of the World'. Although this is a desirable factor today, only being published in the English language limited the overseas sales potential, enhancing the rarity value. SHIRLEY: World, 317.
[Ref: 17813]    £12,500.00 ($16,625 • €14,100 rates)


DANCKERTS, Justus. [A superbly-decorated 17th century double-hemisphere world map]
Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula. Amsterdam, c.1685. Original colour. 490 x 590mm. Two pin holes in left margin, otherwise fine.
A double-hemisphere world with two polar spheres in the cusps. California is an island; the islands of 'Jedso' and 'Terre Esonis' in the north Pacific; and Australia and New Zealand are only partial outlines. The allegorical scenes in the corners feature the Four Elements: 'Earth' is represented by farming; 'Air' by birds, classical figures for the bodies of the Solar System, with signs of the Zodiac; 'Fire' by war, with a battle scene with a burning city; and 'Water' has trading ships, mer-people and a whale. SHIRLEY: 529.
[Ref: 17538]    £6,000.00 ($7,980 • €6,768 rates)


AA, Pieter van der. [Jacques Cassini's planisphere with superb decoration]
Planisphere Terrestre Suivant les nouvelles Observations des Astronomes Dressé et presenté au Roy tres Chretien par Mr. Cassini le Fils, de l'Academie Royal des Sciences. Leiden: van der Aa, 1713. Coloured, 550 x 665mm. Narrow top margin.
A close copy of Jacques Cassini's extremely rare map published by Nolin in 1696, showing the world on an Azimuthal equidistant projection (i.e. in a single sphere, centred on the North Pole, heavily distorting the Antipodes. This, in turn, was based on Jean-Dominique Cassini's 8-metre map prepared for the French Academy of Sciences in the 1680s, the first map to set standard longitudes for known places based on the observations of the moons of Jupiter. Here the sites where the readings were taken are marked with stars. In the Cassini-Nolin map the corners were left blank; here they have been embellished with designs by Jan Goree, with four large classical figures, including Mercury, cherubs and the signs of the Zodiac. On the map California is an island. See SHIRLEY 579 for Cassini's original.
[Ref: 17611]    £6,500.00 ($8,645 • €7,332 rates)


SENEX, John. [An English world map after the Longitude Act]
A New Map of the World From the Latest Observations. Revis'd by I.Senex. Most humbly Inscribd to his Royal Highness George Prince of Wales. London, c.1720. Original outline colour with additions to the borders. 430 x 550mm.
A double-hemisphere map of the world with four further spheres on different projections, an armillary sphere flanked by two figures (one being Hercules) and allegorical figures of the four continents around the title. On the map California is an island (although not on two of the smaller spheres), 'Jesso' is joined to mainland Asia, and Australia is joined to New Guinea via Carpentaria. Unusual features on this map are the faint outlines offering alternative coastlines around the countries furthest from Europe. The Longitude Act of 1714, in which a prize of £20,000 was offered for an accurate method of measuring longitude at sea, highlighted the fact that the exact locations of countries on the other side of the world had yet to be determined. This map displays an unusual admission of lack of certainty by a cartographer! Although this example is marked 'Revis'd' we have been unable to trace an earlier version. George was made Prince of Wales in 1714, and came to the throne of England in 1727 as George II.
[Ref: 17577]    £3,200.00 ($4,256 • €3,610 rates)


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