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Records: 11 to 20 of 387
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  BOOKS 

BOOTH, Charles. [The famous sociological survey of London]
Life and Labour of the People in London. First Series. [&] Second Series. [&] Third Series. [&] Final Volume. London: McMillan & Co., 1902. First edition of the complete work. 17 vols & map case, original parchment-papered boards, gilt-decorated spines, partially unopened; Series 1 with map case with five coloured folding Poverty maps, illustrated in text with graphs & tables; Series 2 illustrated in text with graphs & tables; Series 3 with 20 coloured folding maps (lettered A-U, although 'I' was not used) and sketch maps in text; 'Final Volume' with coloured folding map in rear pocket. Some spotting of text throughout.
A fine and complete set of the three series that made up Booth's socio-economic survey of London, including his famous Poverty map which colour-coded streets according to the degree of wealth of the inhabitants, ranging from black ('Lowest class'), through shades of blue and purple ('Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable'), to red ('Well to do') and yellow ('Wealthy'). Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers (including his cousin Beatrix Potter) to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The First Series of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The Second Series (1891), covering the rest of the city, showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. The Third Series (1902) covered Religious Influences. The 'Final Volume' (also 1902) contained notes on social influences and Conclusions, with a map marking places of worship, public elementary schools and public houses.
[Ref: 15615]    £16,000.00 ($21,536 • €18,288 rates)


  GLOBES 

NEWTON & Son. [A handsome 19th century standing library globe]
Newton's New & Improved Terrestrial Globe Embracing every recent Discovery. London, Newton & Son, 1842. A 12' (30cm) diameter globe, standing 90cm high, with a single pedestal stand with three legs, with four quarter circles supporting the horizon ring.
The globe is made of twelve copper-engraved half gores, coloured and varnished. The meridian ring is brass, as is the English-style hour circle between the meridian and the globe. The horizon ring is also a varnished copper engraving.
[Ref: 18645]    £12,850.00 including VAT ($17,296 • €14,688 rates)


MANNING, James. [A pocket terrestrial globe in its original display box]
Model of the Earth. London, c.1860. 1¾" (45mm) diameter, twelve gores with hand colour, two axis pins, in original cardboard box with brass mount rings. A little wear to box.
A miniature globe from the mid-19th century, with Alaska still marked as Russian Territory (pre-1867). Little is known about James Manning: in 'Globes at Greenwich' Elly Dekker just gives estimated working dates of 1854-63.
[Ref: 18408]    £1,850.00 including VAT ($2,490 • €2,115 rates)


ETSUZANDO. [A rare Japanese table globe on wooden stand]
[A 5" diameter Japanese globe.] Osaka: Etsuzando, c.1900. Hand colour. 5" (125mm) diameter (at equator), brass meridian, wooden base, total 250mm high.
An unusual Japanese globe which is, like the Earth, an oblate spheroid (flattened at the poles). Japanese globes of this vintage are seldom found on the market.
[Ref: 18409]    £1,100.00 including VAT ($1,481 • €1,257 rates)


BETTS, John. [A collapsable globe]
Betts's Portable Terrestrial Globe Compiled from the Latest and Best Authorities. British Empire coloured red. London, George Philip & Son Ltd, & Liverpool, Philip Son & Nephew, c.1925. Printed waxed cotton globe with 'umbrella ' mechanism, metal spindle and hanging ring. Globe circumference 1,260mm extended, 770mm long including spindle. With the original cardboard tube with printed cover. Some faint staining.
An unusual collapsible globe, made spherical by pushing a metal tube upwards along the spindle, It shows the British Empire covering approximately a quarter of the Earth's total land area, with a population of 450 million people. The globe's mechanism was invented by John Betts in 1860; this example is a later issue by G. Philip & Sons who manufactured them after Bett's death c. 1863 to c. 1925. We have estimated the date of this example by the description of St Petersburg as 'Petrograd (Leningrad)' (renamed by the Soviets in 1924), and the separation of Transjordan from Palestine (1922) but before full independence from the British (1928). Undoubtedly the reason for the superb condition of this globe is the original cardboard tube.
[Ref: 16071]    £2,250.00 including VAT ($3,029 • €2,572 rates)


SUMIRA, Sylvia. The Art and History of Globes. A profusely-illustrated guide to old globes New.
A well-written guide to globes, with detailed descriptions of examples from 1492 to the end of the nineteenth century.
[Ref: 14996]    £30.00 ($40 • €34 rates)


  WORLD 
 World & Continent Sets 

CLOPPENBURG, Johannes. [The World and Continents from Cloppenburg's 'Atlas Minor']
Typus Orbis Terrarum; America noviter delineata; Asia; Nova Europae Descriptio; Africæ nova Tabula. Amsterdam, 1632, Latin text edition. Coloured. Five plates, Each c.190 x 260mm. Worm hole in right edge filled on all plates, otherwise a very fine set with dark impression.
Scarce miniature versions of maps of the world and four continents by Jodocus Hondius. They appeared in Cloppenburg's edition of Mercator's 'Atlas Minor', with maps engraved in slightly larger format than standard Dutch pocket atlases by Pieter van den Keere. The borders of the continents are unillustrated, but the world has the Four Elements represented by a cornucopia, bird of paradise, salamander and a sea monster in the corners, two scenes from the Garden of Eden in the upper cusp and the Last Judgement below. First published in 1630, there was a third edition in 1636 before a hiatus until an edition in 1673, suggesting the plates were supressed. BURDEN: 225, first state of three.
[Ref: 17985]    £3,750.00 ($5,048 • €4,286 rates)


JAILLOT, Alexis-Hubert. [A majestic large format set of World & Continents]
[Set of World & 5 Continents.] Amsterdam, Pieter Mortier, c.1700. Original colour. 6 plates, each printed on two sheets and conjoined, totals c. 580 x 880mm. Laid on linen, as originally issued.
A fine set of large and decorative maps, from Mortier's issue of Jaillot's 'Atlas Nouveau', consisting of a double-hemisphere World, Europe, Asia, Africa, North America, and South America. While all the maps have Jaillot's name on them the world is n uncommon a new plate after Witsen. California is back on the mainland but it has a long baja on both sides of the peninsula, a possibly unique depiction. Further north is a huge 'Mer de l'Ouest' and a North-West Passage. In the other hemisphere Tasmania and New Guinea are joined by a hypothetical coastline, and Ezo is part of mainland Asia. The other maps are Sanson's maps, redrawn on a larger scale by Jaillot at the request of Sanson's heirs. The North America still has the large island of California. SHIRLEY: World 621, 'a new two-sheet world map... of special interest'; NORWICH: Africa 46; McLAUGHLIN: 55.
[Ref: 18316]    £22,500.00 ($30,285 • €25,718 rates)


 World Maps 

SCANDIANESE, Tito Giovanni. [An Italian poem about hunting, illustrated with Ludovico Dolce's world map]
I Quattro Libri della Caccia. [Bound with] La Sfera di Proclo. Venice: Gabriel Giolito et Fratelli, 1556, First Edition. 4to, contemporary limp vellum; pp. 164 + 20, 16 woodcut vignettes with other woodcut decorations. [&] pp. 23, title with woodcut illustration, other woodcut decorations, publisher's emblem at end. Wormholes in titlepage, a few pages and emblem, ink stamp on spine and covers.
An Italian illustrated hunting poem with a short treatise on falconry at the end, written under this pseudonym by Tito Gazarini (1518-82). On page 23 is a printing of Ludovico Dolce's unusual world map which is an amalgam of Macrobius and Gastaldi: the shape is that of Macrobius, with the zones around the equator and windheads; however on North America are 'Terra del Bacalaosa' and 'Nueva Hispania' of Gastaldi. The Straits of Magellan also appear.
[Ref: 17393]    £1,600.00 ($2,154 • €1,829 rates)


DOLCE, Lodovico. [An important Italian translation of Ovid's 'Metamorphoses']
Le Trasformationi di M. Lodovico Dolce. In questa quarta impressione da lui in molti luoghi ricorrette. Venice: Gabriel Giolito de Ferrari, 1557. Fourth edition. 4to, C18th half calf with marbled boards and endpapers; pp. (xvi)+309+(i)+colophon; woodcut title and text illustrations throughout, incl. world map on p.3. Unidentified engr. ex-libris label & Italian bookseller's label on front paste-down.
The fourth edition of Lodovico Dolce's translation of Ovid's 'Metamorphoses', first published 1553. It is illustrated with numerous woodcuts, including a world map which is an amalgam of Macrobius and Gastaldi: the shape is that of Macrobius, with the zones around the equator and windheads; however on North America are 'Terra del Bacalaosa' and 'Nueva Hispania' of Gastaldi. The Straits of Magellan also appear. Lodovico Dolce (c.1508-1568) was a prolific author: he wrote comedies, tragedies and histories; edited the works of Dante, Boccaccio and Tasso, among others; and translated Greek and Roman classics, including texts by Homer, Euripides Cicero and, of course, Ovid. Publius Ovidius Naso (43 BC-17/18 AD), better known as Ovid, published his Metamorphoses in 8 AD. A narrative poem, it contained over 250 myths relating to the world from its creation to the deification of Julius Cæsar. It was incredibly influential, and was one of the first books printed in English, by William Caxton in 1480. SHIRLEY: 95 for world map.
[Ref: 15464]    £1,800.00 ($2,423 • €2,057 rates)


Records: 11 to 20 of 387
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