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Records: 11 to 20 of 325
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  WORLD 
 World Maps 

BARTHOLOMEW, John. [Victorian map of the British Empire]
British Empire Throughout the World Exhibited in One View. Edinburgh: A. Fullarton, c.1865. Lithographic map, printed in colours and hand-finished. Printed area 440 x 540mm.
The archetypal map of the British Empire, with vast swathes of the world marked in red. Although the Empire had yet to reach its zenith, there are colonies on every continent. Surrounding the map are figures representing the various peoples of the empire, arranged in five groups: 'Australian Settlers and Natives'; 'North Americans white and copper coloured'; 'Natives of British Asia and of East Indian Islands'; 'Natives of British Empire in Europe'; & 'Cape Colony and Southern Africa'.
[Ref: 18259]    £1,100.00 ($1,412 • €1,231 rates)


MORALES, Jose Pilar. [A Spanish geological world map]
Mapa Geologico del Globo Spain: Astort Hernandos, c.1880. Sheet size 590 x 770 mm.
Map of the world on a homolographic projection (equal area projection that reproduces the ratios of areas as they exist on the earth's surfacfe). The map is set in Spanish text which contains geological data and information.
[Ref: 18693]    £350.00 ($449 • €392 rates)


BACON, George Washington. [Wall map of the world at the beginning of the 20th century]
Bacon's New Chart of the World. Mercator's Projection. London: G.W. Bacon & Co., c.1907. Colour lithographic map. Dissected and laid on linen as issued , total 950 x 1200mm, folded into original covers.
A large map of the world, showing the British Empire, at its height, marked in red. Around the map are inset details: with plans of towns including Hong Kong, Singapore, Sydney and New York; the Panama and Suez Canals; the British Isles; the two Poles; and a Universal Time Chart. Along the top are a selection of national flags and ensigns; along the bottom are Gazetteers and a list of Principal British Steamship lines.
[Ref: 18410]    £1,000.00 ($1,284 • €1,119 rates)


Anonymous. [Souvenir flag for the Silver Jubileee of King George V & Queen Mary. with a map of the British Empire]
Twenty-Fifth Anniversary. 1910-1935. 1935. Colour-printed wood engraving on linen. 570 x 820mm.
A souvenir flag published for the silver jubilee (twenty-five years on the throne) of King George V and Queen Mary. Below their images is a double-hemisphere world map with the British Empire coloured red and a coat of arms.
[Ref: 18048]    £980.00 ($1,258 • €1,097 rates)


SHIRLEY, R.W. [Indispensible reference on World maps]
The Mapping of the World: Early Printed Maps 1472-1700. London:The Holland Press, 1987. Folio, cloth & d/w; pp. 669 profusely illustrated. Spine faded, otherwise in excellent condition.
The 1987 edition of this weighty tome. This cartobibliographical study illustrates how the world map developed from the earliest years of printing in the 1470s up to the turn of the seventeenth century.
[Ref: 18161]    £475.00 ($610 • €532 rates)


 Polar Maps 

MERCATOR, Gerard. [Mercator's famous map of the Arctic]
Septentrionalium Terrarum descriptio. Amsterdam, Henricus Hondius, 1628. French text edition. Old colour. 365 x 390mm. Wormhole repaired to left margin.
The first map of the Arctic Circle, with both the North Pole and Magnetic North depicted as rocky islands. Mercator has included the latest voyages in search of the North West and North East Passages, marking the discoveries of Frobisher and Davis around Greenland. Within the roundels of the decorative borders are maps of the Shetlands, Faeroes and the mythical island of Friesland. This second state (post-1606) improves the outline of Nova Zembla, making it one island, and has one of the polar islands receding to allow the inclusion of Spitzbergen. A classic decorative map. BURDEN: 88; KOEMAN: Me 28a.
[Ref: 18925]    £2,400.00 ($3,082 • €2,686 rates)


PITT, Moses. [The only original map in Pitt's 'English Atlas']
A Map of the North-Pole and the Parts Adjoining. Oxford: Moses Pitt, 1680. Coloured. 460 x 590mm. A few small repairs, pinholes in crest.
A scarce map of the Arctic Circle, with the title on a curtain, with portraits of Lapplanders and a whaling scene. On the map the mythical island of Frisland is marked, as is a strait through Greenland, placed there instead of Canada by Martin Frobisher, who had been confused by the non-existence of Frisland. Further west the discoveries of the English explorers looking for the North West Passage are shown. Bottom left are the arms of Charles FitzCharles (1657-80), the son of Charles II, which consists of his father's arms with a baton sinister vair overall, signifying illegitimacy. He died of dysentery defending Tangier, which had been part of his father's dowry when marrying the Portuguese princess Catherine of Braganza in 1662.
[Ref: 17805]    £4,500.00 ($5,778 • €5,036 rates)


COOK, Captain James. [HODGES, William.]
The Ice Islands, seen the 9th of Jan.ry 1773. London: Strahan and Cadell, 1777. 245 x 395mm.
An illustration to Cook's 'A Voyage towards the South Pole', showing 'Resolution's longboats collecting ice for drinking water and shooting at sea birds'. On his Second Voyage (1772-5) James Cook circumnavigated the world as far south as he could, attempting to locate any 'Terra Australis Incognita'.
[Ref: 17118]    £150.00 ($193 • €168 rates)


  AMERICA 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The first atlas map devoted to America]
Tabula Terre Nove. Strasbourg, Johannes Shott, 1513. Woodcut, printed area 385 x 445mm, paper watermarked with a fleur de lis, with good margins. Near mint condition
The rare first issue of Wäldseemüller's famous 'Admiral's map', the first printed atlas map specifically of the Americas. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. The twenty place names in North America suggest his sources were Portuguese, particularly the Cantino chart of 1502 and Caveri of c.1505. As the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida Peninsula appear before recorded voyages to either, this map is regarded as evidence of forgotten expeditions. It was Wäldseemüller's wall map of the world (1507) that first used the name 'America', although he was only using it for the parts of South America explored by Amerigo Vespucci. However others started using the name for the whole of the New World and here Wäldseemüller is trying to make amends: a Latin note reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. BURDEN: 3.
[Ref: 17346]   P.O.A.


WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The Fries version of Wäldseemüller's 'Admiral's map' of the Americas]
[Tabula Terræ Novæ .] Vienne: Michael Servetus, 1541. Woodcut, printed area 285 x 430mm.
One of the earliest obtainable maps to show the New World, this example being the fourth and last issue of the Fries reduction of Wäldseemüller's famous map, which is the first printed atlas map devoted to the Americas and said to have been compiled with the assistance of Columbus himself. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. In his version Fries added a Spanish flag over Cuba and a vignette scene in South America depicting cannibals and an opossum, both reported by Vespucci. It was Wäldseemüller's world map of 1507 that first used the name 'America', placing in southern South America, after Vespucci, who explored that region and proved it was not part of Asia. When the name began to be used for the entire landmass Wäldseemüller used this map to emphasise Columbus's importance: a Latin text above 'Terra Nova' reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. This map was originally intended not for an edition of Ptolemy but for a new 'Chronica mundi' being written by Wäldseemüller: his death c.1520 caused the project to be shelved, so the woodcuts were used to publish a smaller sized and so cheaper edition of the 'Geography'. The title, as above, is on the reverse within a plain border. BURDEN: 4.
[Ref: 18827]    £8,500.00 ($10,914 • €9,512 rates)


Records: 11 to 20 of 325
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