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Records: 11 to 15 of 15
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  AMERICA 
 Canada 

ROSS, John. [John Ross's discoveries in the Gulf of Boothia]
To His Most Excellent Majesty William IVth, King of Great Britain, Ireland &c. This Chart of the Discoveries made in the Arctic Regions, in 1829, 30, 31, 32, & 33, is dedicated... London: John Ross, 1834. Original colour. 465 x 615mm. Binding folds flattened
A map of the discoveries of John Ross and his nephew, John Clark Ross, in the Gulf of Boothia, with five coastal profiles. On an expedition to find the North West Passage Ross was the first European to enter the gulf, although it had been seen by Parry in 1822, naming it after their patron, gin-magnate Sir Felix Booth. They spent the next four years stuck in ice, during which time John Clark Ross became the first European to reach the Magnetic North Pole, then at Cape Adelaide on the Boothia Peninsula. Eventually the crew left their ship and were rescued by a whaler, who thought they had perished two years before. This map was published in Ross's 'Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-West Passage'.
[Ref: 17439]    £360.00 ($458 • €404 rates)


HAWKINS, Ernest. [An account of the Anglican Church in Fredericton, New Brunswick]
Annals of the Diocese of Fredericton. London: The Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1847. 8vo, original blind-decoarate cloth, gilt lettered on front board; pp. (viii)+74; steel engraved frontispiece & folding map. Spine slightly faded.
An account of the Church of England in Fredericton, capital of New Brunswick, written by Ernest Hawkins (1802-68) during the building of Christ Church Cathedral (started 1845, consacrated 1853), which elevated Fredericton to city status. The frontispiece shows the cathedral under construction; the map is of the diocese.
[Ref: 15863]    £450.00 ($573 • €505 rates)


TALLIS, John. [West Canada]
West Canada. London, J. & F. Tallis, c.1851. Original outline colour. Printed area 260 x 340mm.
Map of Western Canada, showing the eastern coast of Lake Huron, with Lakes Erie and Ontario. Drawn and engraved by John Rapkin, the map has decorative borders and vignettes of the Niagara Falls, Kingston, an Indian encampment and beavers. It was published in John Howard Hinton's 'History of the United States of America, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time'.
[Ref: 18060]    £150.00 ($191 • €168 rates)


TALLIS, John. [Map of Eastern Canada with vignettes]
East Canada and New Brunswick. London, J. & F. Tallis., c.1851. Original outline colour. Steel engraving, printed area 260 x 340mm.
A detailed map of eastern Canada, with the St Lawrence River and the cities of Montreal and Quebec, drawn and engraved by John Rapkin and published in John Howard Hinton's 'History of the United States of America, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time'. The map is within an ornate printed border and has vignettes of Quebec, American Indians, a bison and a mink. Of interest is the reference to 'Madawaska Settlements', an area left in dispute by Britain and the United States after the Treaty of Versailles set the border between the U.S. and Canada. Matters were brought to a head when a US settler, John Baker, attempted to declare the area a republic in 1827. After a failed attempt at arbitration by the King of the Netherlands in 1831 and the non-violent 'Aroostook War' of 1838-9, the matter was included in the Webster-Ashburton Treaty of 1842.
[Ref: 17751]    £150.00 ($191 • €168 rates)


MORENO, Miguel. [A scarce Spanish two-sheet sea chart of Newfoundland]
Carta Esférica en dos hojas del Banco y la Isla de Terranova con parte parte de la Costa de Labrador.... Madrid: Direccion de Hidrografia, 1840-c.1860. Touches of original colour. Two sheets, each c. 630 x 935mm. South sheet wiith some toning.
A detailed Spanish sea chart of Newfoundland on two sheets. The lighthouses are marked with colour.
[Ref: 11852]    £1,200.00 ($1,528 • €1,348 rates)


Records: 11 to 15 of 15
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