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Records: 21 to 30 of 49
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  LONDON 
 London Maps 

Anonymous. [London's new Metropolitan Boroughs in 1832]
The Metropolitan Boroughs as defined by the Reform Bill. London, 1832. Coloured, 600 x 510mm. Folds flattened as usual on this issue.
Extending North to South from Tottenham to Norwood and East to West from West Ham to Kensington. This map was produced after the Electoral Reform Bill of 1831/32 that created the metropolitan boroughs of London. HOWGEGO: 338.
[Ref: 14974]    £600.00 ($781 • €670 rates)


Anonymous. [An early 'Underground' map]
London UndergrounD Railways. Johnson, Riddle & Co., 1910. Wood engraving, printed in colours. Sheet 220 x 270mm. Wear to folds reinforced.
An early paper folding map of the Underground, published only two years after the first. This version has the background road layout removed and the key of lines moved from top left to bottom right. The mainline stations are numbered 1-13 in black blocks; other attractions are numbered 14-42 in blue (listed on the reverse), including the Japanese-British Exhibiton at White City in 1910. The proposed extension of the Central Line (here coloured blue) from Bank to Liverpool Street is marked.
[Ref: 17437]    £400.00 ($520 • €447 rates)


Anonymous. [An early 'Underground' map in a card folder]
London UndergrounD Railways. Johnson, Riddle & Co., 1910. Wood engraving, printed in colours. Sheet 220 x 270mm.
An early folding pocket map of the Underground, published only two years after the first. This version has the background road layout removed and the key of lines moved from top left to bottom right. The mainline stations are numbered 1-13 in black blocks; other attractions are numbered 14-42 in blue (listed on the reverse), including the Japanese-British Exhibiton at White City in 1910. The proposed extension of the Central Line (here coloured blue) from Bank to Liverpool Street is marked. This issue is an over-printed version of 1910 - 2, within a card folder. Two boxes on the map advertise 'H.L. Leach, Sight-Testing Optician, 210, High Road, Kilburn', with an arrow pointing at his local station, Kilburn Brondesbury; the card folder advertises 'Fredk. Leach, Jeweller & Silversmith' at the same address, with a list of products and a note about their 'Optical Department'.
[Ref: 18017]    £440.00 ($572 • €491 rates)


Anonymous. [Early map of London's underground railways]
Underground Map of London. Dangerfield Printing Company, London; 1919. 275 x 345mm.
Published just after the end of World War One, the lines are shown with reasonable geographic accuracy against an outline of the major roads. The only names above ground are open spaces, including Regents Park, Kew Gardens, Hampstead Heath and Brent Reservoir.
[Ref: 18019]    £600.00 ($781 • €670 rates)


Anonymous. [A map of the Underground for the British Empire Exhibition]
Metropolitan Railway and Connections. How to get to and from the British Empire Exhibition, Wembley Park. Under Cover All The Way. London: Metropolitan Railway, 1925. Lithographic map, printed in red and blue. Sheet 110 x 150mm, folded twice.
A map of the electric railways routes to the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley, for which the orginal Wembley Stadium was built and a special 'Exhibition Station' opened on the Metropolitan Line. Despite the introduction of the 'Underground' publicity campaign in 1908, this card omits any mention of it despite showing all the lines in Central London, only naming the Metropolitan Railway.
[Ref: 17436]    £480.00 ($624 • €536 rates)


Anonymous. [A map of the Underground for the British Empire Exhibition]
Metropolitan Railway and Connections. How to get to and from the British Empire Exhibition, Wembley Park. Under Cover All The Way. London: Metropolitan Railway, 1925. Lithographic map, printed in red and blue. Sheet 110 x 150mm, folded twice.
A map of the electric railways routes to the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley, for which the orginal Wembley Stadium was built and a special 'Exhibition Station' opened on the Metropolitan Line. Despite the introduction of the 'Underground' publicity campaign in 1908, this card omits any mention of it despite showing all the lines in Central London, only naming the Metropolitan Railway.
[Ref: 18501]    £460.00 ($598 • €514 rates)


  BRITISH ISLES 
 Ireland 

Anonymous. [Map of Ireland]
Charte von Ireland. Prague, 1810. Coloured. 420 x300 mm.
A Czech map of Ireland at the beginning of the nineteenth century.
[Ref: 15580]    £240.00 ($312 • €268 rates)


  EUROPE 

Anonymous. [A World War One commemorative handkerchief]
[Europe at the outbreak of World War I.] Italian c. 1914. Colour-printed wood engraving on linen. 480 x 635mm. A very fine example.
A map of central and eastern Europe within a maritime ropework border. In the corners are Union flags paired with the flags of the principal allies at the beginning of WWI: France, Russia and Belgium.
[Ref: 15199]    £400.00 ($520 • €447 rates)


Anonymous. [An anti-Maquis poster from 1944]
Les Pays Changent - Hommes et Méthodes Sont les Mêmes. Katyn, Vinnitza, H.te Savoie... Le Stalinisme ferait de l'Europe un Charnier! Savoy?, 1944. Colour offset lithograph. Sheet 805 x 1195mm. Minor repairs to folds.
A propaganda poster with a map of Europe filled with a montage of photographs of dead bodies, with arrow highlighting three examples. The title reads 'Countries change - Men and methods stay the same... Stalinism will make Europe a charnel house'. Published either by the Vichy French or the Germans occupiers of Haute-Savoie, it seeks to associate the uprising of the 'Maquis des Glières', the local French Resistance, in 1943-4 with two of the most notorious massacres perpetrated by Stalinist Russia: Katyn in Poland (22,000 army officers, police and intelligensia, 1940); and Vinnytsia in the Ukraine (10,000, most shot, during the Great Purge, 1937-38). By labelling the Maquis as communists and linking their guerrilla tactics (which killed French police and collaborators as well as Germans) with Soviet atrocities, the authors of this poster hoped to undermine their support among the local population.
[Ref: 18452]    £950.00 ($1,236 • €1,061 rates)


 Poland 

Anonymous. [The Battle of Zorndorf, 1758]
Plan of the Battle of Zorndorff fought Aug.st 25.th 1758. London: T.Kinnersley, 1759, Sheet 205 x 105mm.
The Battle of of Zornsdorf (now Sarbinowo, Poland) was fought between the Prussians and Russians during the Seven Years' War, as Frederick II of Prussia came up behing the Russian army, which was besieging Küstrin. Because of unsuitable terrain flanking manoeuvres were impossible, so the battle became a bloody head-to-head clash. The Prussians lost a third of their 36,000 men and the Russians 18,000 of their 43,500. Because the Russians refused to retreat Frederick famously declared that 'it's easier to kill the Russians than to win over them'. This map was published in the February edition of 'The Grand Magazine of Magazines. or Universal Register'. Mostly written by David Henry, the magazine was published as a competitor to the 'Gentleman's Magazine'. The circulation was never high and it folded in 1760.
[Ref: 14895]    £225.00 ($293 • €251 rates)


Records: 21 to 30 of 49
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