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Records: 21 to 30 of 311
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  WORLD 
 World Maps 

MENETRIER, F. [A double-hemisphere wall map of the world illustrated with costumes]
Le Petit Journal. Mappemonde. Paris, c.1900. Colour-printed wood engraving. 940 x 1095mm. Minor repairs to folds.
A highly decorative map of the world, with a vignette scene from each continent in the corners and cusps, including an American paddle steamer, and eighty-one costumes from around the world in three rows. On the map the shipping routes are marked with sailing times, for example London to Australia and New Zealand in 45 days. As this map was published as a supplement to the French 'Petit Journal' the ephemeral nature of this map makes surviving examples very unusual.
[Ref: 16005]    £3,500.00 ($4,452 • €3,910 rates)


BACON, George Washington. [Wall map of the world at the beginning of the 20th century]
Bacon's New Chart of the World. Mercator's Projection. London: G.W. Bacon & Co., c.1907. Colour lithographic map. Dissected and laid on linen as issued , total 950 x 1200mm, folded into original covers.
A large map of the world, showing the British Empire, at its height, marked in red. Around the map are inset details: with plans of towns including Hong Kong, Singapore, Sydney and New York; the Panama and Suez Canals; the British Isles; the two Poles; and a Universal Time Chart. Along the top are a selection of national flags and ensigns; along the bottom are Gazetteers and a list of Principal British Steamship lines.
[Ref: 18410]    £1,000.00 ($1,272 • €1,117 rates)


GROSS, Alexander. [The British Empire at its height]
Commercial & Political Map of the World on Mercator's Projection. The British Empire Coloured prominently in Red. London: Geographia Ltd, c.1920. Colour lithograph, printed area 950 x 1460mm, dissected and laid on linen as issued.
A large map of the world, published just after the end of the First World War, when the British Empire was at its peak. Insets show gains by the British from the Germans in Australasia, Africa and the Near East (including Iraq), details of the Suez and Panama canals. Born in Hungary as Sandor Grosz, Gross came to London, founding the map publishing company Geographia Ltd in 1911 before emigrating to the US around 1930. His daughter, Phyllis Pearsall, walked the 23,000 streets of London in the 1930s and compiled London's first A-Z.
[Ref: 18297]    £1,400.00 ($1,781 • €1,564 rates)


GILL, Leslie MacDonald. [The beginning of the 'Special Relationship']
The ''Time and Tide'' Map of the Atlantic Charter. London: George Philip & Son, 1943. Colour lithographic map. Sheet 900 x 1140mm. Laid on conservation canvas
A large and decorative map of the world, published by 'Time and Tide' magazine to commemorate the signing of the 'Atlantic Charter' by Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt. The countries are marked with their commodities, shown in a large key. As well as quoting from the charter, there are other quotes about peace from Emmerson, Artistotle, Cicero and the Bible. The last is illustrated with a man using a sledgehammer on a tank, turning it into ploughshares. This policy statement, issued on 14th August 1941(four months before the U.S. entered the Second World War) set out the Allies' vision for cooperation in the post-war world. Not only did it cement the 'Special Relationship' of the U.S. and Britain, but it also led to the 'Declaration by United Nations' (1st January, 1942) which formed the basis of the United Nations. Tom Harper of the British Library has described this as 'one of the key maps of the 20th century'. Leslie MacDonald Gill (1884-1947, known as Max), younger brother of Eric Gill, specialised in graphic design in the Arts and Crafts style. His most important commission was from the Imperial War Graves Commission, designing the script used on Commission headstones and war memorials, including the 'Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme'. His 'Wonderground Map of London', originally drawn as an advertising poster for London Electric Underground Railway Company in 1914, was such a success it is credited with saving the 'UndergrounD' advertising campaign.
[Ref: 18459]    £8,250.00 ($10,494 • €9,215 rates)


BUREAU OF NAVAL PERSONNEL. [Double-sided poster map of the Europe and Pacific Theatres of WW2]
Nav War Map No 3. World War 2 in the North Sea Area. [&] Nav War Map No 4. The North Pacific Area. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1944. Colour lithograph, printed on both sides. Sheet 1010 x 1080mm. Repairs to folds.
Two colourful propaganda maps of two of the most areas of the American war effort in 1944, each giving a brief history of events. The first shows the North Atlantic and North Sea, published just prior to the Normandy landings, illustrates the hunt for the German battleship Bismark and the success of the Arctic convoys. A label over England reads 'The R.A.F. and the A.A.F. control the industrial heart of Europe from England, the world's most powerful air base', and streams of planes show the targets of bombing campaigns in Europe. The map on the reverse shows the Pacific theatre, with a timeline listing Japanese aggression from the taking of Formosa in 1895 to Pearl Harbour. The map shows the extent of the Japanese attacks on American bases and the American counter attacks, with diagrams underneath detailing the battles of Medway and Attu.
[Ref: 16657]    £1,400.00 ($1,781 • €1,564 rates)


 Polar Maps 

BLAEU, Johannes. [A map of the early exploration of the Arctic Circle]
Regiones sub Polo Arctico. Amsterdam, c.1645, French text edition. Fine original colour. 410 x 630mm.
The Arctic Circle, showing European attempts to find the North West and North East Passages. In Arctic America the preponderance of English names shows the importance of the English explorers in the region, trying to circumvent the Spanish control of routes to the East Indies. On Greenland the entrance to 'M. Forbischers Straet' is marked and in Arctic Russia the names are those given by the Dutch explorers such as Berentz. At the top of the map is a title cartouche depicting wind-heads, a European explorer with a brazier on his lap and a white cannibal, and a scale cartouche with hunters and a polar bear. The European is Henry Hudson, whose explorations in Hudson's Bay (which he called 'a labyrinth without end') ended in 1611 when he was forced into a small boat and cast adrift by a mutinous crew. He was never seen again and it is assumed that his crew would have turned to eating each other to survive. This is an example of the second state of the map, with the dedication added c.1645. It is a direct copy of Jansson's map, but it is interesting that the engraver copied the Baltic Sea's name but not the coastline! BURDEN: 252.
[Ref: 18265]    £1,100.00 ($1,399 • €1,229 rates)


  AMERICA 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The first atlas map devoted to America]
Tabula Terre Nove. Strassburg, Johannes Shott, 1513. Woodcut, printed area 385 x 445mm, paper watermarked with a fleur de lis, with good margins.
The rare first issue of Wäldseemüller's famous 'Admiral's map', the first printed atlas map specifically of the Americas. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. The twenty place names in North America suggest his sources were Portuguese, particularly the Cantino chart of 1502 and Caveri of c.1505. As the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida Peninsula appear before recorded voyages to either, this map is regarded as evidence of forgotten expeditions. It was Wäldseemüller's wall map of the world (1507) that first used the name 'America', although he was only using it for the parts of South America explored by Amerigo Vespucci. However others started using the name for the whole of the New World and here Wäldseemüller is trying to make amends: a Latin note reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. This is the best example of this landmark map we have ever seen. BURDEN: 3.
[Ref: 17346]   P.O.A.


DE BRY, Theodore. [An important book on early American exploration]
[The Great or American Voyages.] Frankfurt: 1594-1617. Parts I-VI only (of 13) in one volume. Latin text. Folio (335 x 235 mm), 17th century vellum over pasteboard, the flat spine with small panel outlined in gilt with rolls, titled in gilt within the panel. A few neat repairs, part VI lacking 2nd section (from page 108 including 2nd frontis. and 28 plates), binding with minor repairs to spine and the board edges, endpapers replaced.
De Bry's important collection of voyages of exploration to the Americas, containing several landmark maps of the continent. Included are Hariot's account of the English colony in Virginia (second edition, second issue, 1606), with the important map of the Roanoke colony in Virginia and plates after John White; Jacques Le Moyne's Florida (second edition, 1609), with his map of south east North America and engravings of Florida and its inhabitants; Hans Stadius's Brazil (second edition, first issue, 1605) with his map of Peru and Brazil; and Girolamo Benzoni's History of the New World (first two parts second editions, 1594 & 1617, the third the first edition of 1596), with maps of the Western Hemisphere, the West Indies and New Spain, and a view of Cusco.
[Ref: 12946]    £75,000.00 ($95,400 • €83,775 rates)


 North America 

Anonymous. [A map of North America after Cook's Third Voyage]
Amerique Septentrionale. Paris, c. 1785. Coloured. 200 x 225mm.
A small format map of North America showing the mapping of the Pacific coast by Captain Cook on his Third Voyage, but pre-dating Vancouver's discoveries of 1791-2.
[Ref: 17179]    £160.00 ($204 • €179 rates)


 Eastern Seaboard 

HOLME, Thomas. [The first printed map of Pennsylvania]
A Mapp of Ye Improved Part of Pensilvania in America, Divided into Countyes, Townships and Lotts. To William Penn Esq. Proprietor & Governer of Pennsylvania This Mapp is Humbly Dedicated and Presented by Jn.o Harris. London: George Willdey, c.1715. 405 x 550mm. London: George Willdey, c.1715. 405 x 550mm.
An important map, being the first survey of William Penn's colony of Philadelphia, and containing the first plan of Philadelphia, the earliest map of any English city in America. Thomas Holme (1624-95) learned surveying in Cromwell's army, but became a Quaker after the end of the Civil War, which brought him into William Penn's circle. When Penn's original surveyor for the colony died en route to America, Holme was invited by Penn to take his place as Surveyor-General in 1682. He compiled a map of the new colony and carefully recorded the names of those who had bought property, and drew a plan of how the streets of Philadelphia were to be laid out. This street map is one of the first examples of urban planning. In May 1687 Penn requested a copy of Holme's map be send to London for publication, to encourage further migration. The map was issued in two formats: as a six-sheet wall map engraved by Francis Lamb, of which only four example still exist (Burden 628); and this single-sheet version, engraved by John Harris and originally published by Philip Lea c.1688. Like the six-sheet version it featured the plan of Philadelphia prominently. BURDEN: 669, state ii of iv.
[Ref: 16279]    £37,500.00 ($47,700 • €41,888 rates)


Records: 21 to 30 of 311
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