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Records: 21 to 30 of 218
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  WORLD 
 World Maps 

ANDRIVEAU-GOUJON, J. [A very large 19th Century double-hemisphere world map on four sheets]
Mappemonde en deux Hémisphères. L'État actuel des connaissances Géographiques et les derniers Voyages Autour du Monde. Paris, 1853. Coloured steel engraving, printed on four sheets conjoined, total 980 x 1310mm.
A large scale double-hemisphere world map published in the middle of the 19th century, with decorative embellishments top and bottom. This map was usually issued separately as a folding map, although this is the rare uncut example, which was probably bound into Andriveau Goujon's scarce 'Atlas Choix'
[Ref: 17503]    £2,500.00 ($3,380 • €2,784 rates)


MENETRIER, F. [A double-hemisphere wall map of the world illustrated with costumes]
Le Petit Journal. Mappemonde. Paris, c.1900. Colour-printed wood engraving. 940 x 1095mm. Minor repairs to folds.
A highly decorative map of the world, with a vignette scene from each continent in the corners and cusps, including an American paddle steamer, and eighty-one costumes from around the world in three rows. On the map the shipping routes are marked with sailing times, for example London to Australia and New Zealand in 45 days. As this map was published as a supplement to the French 'Petit Journal' the ephemeral nature of this map makes surviving examples very unusual.
[Ref: 16005]    £4,500.00 ($6,084 • €5,011 rates)


BACON, George Washington. [Wall map of the world at the beginning of the 20th century]
Bacon's New Chart of the World. Mercator's Projection. London: G.W. Bacon & Co., c.1907. Colour lithographic map. Dissected and laid on linen as issued , total 950 x 1200mm, folded into original covers
A large map of the world, showing the British Empire, at its height, marked in red. Around the map are inset details: with plans of towns including Hong Kong, Singapore, Sydney and New York; the Panama and Suez Canals; the British Isles; the two Poles; and a Universal Time Chart. Along the top are a selection of national flags and ensigns; along the bottom are Gazetteers and a list of Principal British Steamship lines.
[Ref: 17993]    £1,000.00 ($1,352 • €1,114 rates)


GILL, Leslie MacDonald. [A vivid poster map advertising the GPO's communication network]
Post Office Radio-Telephone Services. London: His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1935. Colour lithograph, 990 x 1230mm. A small chip in bottom margin otherwise near mint.
A colourful map of the world, on an azimuthal projection, although Gill has chosen to depict two Antarcticas (one under Australia, the other under South America) rather than stretch the ice out across the bottom of the map. The British Empire is shown in red. In various places around the map are scrolls with literary quotes relating to travel from Ovid, Wolfe, Tennyson and, of course, Shakespeare: his ''I’ll put a girdle round about the Earth in forty minutes'' (Robin, 'A Midsummer Night’s Dream') is placed in the Pacific. Under the map are five roundel illustrations: 'Rugby Radio Station, Telephony Transmitter Room'; 'R.R.S. Main Power House'; 'Faraday Building, London'; R.R.S. Aerial Tuning Inductance'; and 'R.R.S. Demountable Valve'. Bottom right is the new logo of the GPO, also designed by Gill. The company must have been pleased with the result, as the GPO commissioned another map, with the same map projection for their Steamship Routes in 1937. Leslie MacDonald Gill (1884-1947, known as Max), younger brother of Eric Gill, specialised in graphic design in the Arts and Crafts style. His most important commission was from the Imperial War Graves Commission, designing the script used on Commission headstones and war memorials, including the 'Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme'. His 'Wonderground Map of London', originally drawn as an advertising poster for London Electric Underground Railway Company in 1914, was such a success it is credited with saving the 'UndergrounD' advertising campaign.
[Ref: 17915]    £6,000.00 ($8,112 • €6,681 rates)


  AMERICA 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The Fries version of Wäldseemüller's 'Admiral's map' of the Americas]
[Tabula Terræ Novæ .] Vienne: Michael Servetus, 1541. Woodcut, printed area 285 x 430mm.
One of the earliest obtainable maps to show the New World, this example being the fourth and last issue of the Fries reduction of Wäldseemüller's famous map, which is the first printed atlas map devoted to the Americas and said to have been compiled with the assistance of Columbus himself. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. In his version Fries added a Spanish flag over Cuba and a vignette scene in South America depicting cannibals and an opossum, both reported by Vespucci. It was Wäldseemüller's world map of 1507 that first used the name 'America', placing in southern South America, after Vespucci, who explored that region and proved it was not part of Asia. When the name began to be used for the entire landmass Wäldseemüller used this map to emphasise Columbus's importance: a Latin text above 'Terra Nova' reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. This map was originally intended not for an edition of Ptolemy but for a new 'Chronica mundi' being written by Wäldseemüller: his death c.1520 caused the project to be shelved, so the woodcuts were used to publish a smaller sized and so cheaper edition of the 'Geography'. The title, as above, is on the reverse within a plain border. BURDEN: 4.
[Ref: 17900]    £9,750.00 ($13,182 • €10,857 rates)


CHÂTELAIN, Henri Abraham. [A monumental wall map of the Pacific and America]
Carte très curieuse de la Mer du Sud, contenant des Remarques Nouvelles et très utiles non seulement sur des Ports et Îles de cette Mer, mais aussy sur les principaux Pays de l'Amerique tant Septentrionale que Méridionale en a été faite. Amsterdam, 1719. Four sheets conjoined, total 830 x 1410mm. A superb example.
A large map of the western hemisphere, centred on the Americas but showing the coasts of Western Europe & Africa on the right, China & Japan on the left, with the partial outlines of Australia & New Zealand. California is shown as an island, but the north of the island has lighter shading to suggest doubt, as has the western half of the Terra del Fuego. Jesso and Companies Land are also shown above Japan, but two large vignettes of beavers cover the gap between Asia and America. Other vignettes include portraits of the most important explorers; plans of Panama, Acapulco, Mexico City & Havana; depictions of mining, panning for gold, sugar milling, a cod fishery and human sacrifice. The map was included in Chatelain's seven-volume 'Atlas Historique', published between 1705 and 1720. This encyclopedic work was devoted to the history and genealogy of the continents, with a text, written by Nicolas Gueudeville, on topics including geography, cosmography, topography, heraldry, and ethnography. GOSS: Mapping of North America 52, 'a veritable pictorial encyclopaedia of the western hemisphere'.
This item is currently on reserve


LE ROUGE, Georges-Louis. [18th century map of North & South America]
Amerique Suivant Le R.P.Charlevoix Jte, Mr de la Condamine, et Plusieurs autres Nouv.le Observations. Paris, c.1746. Original colour with additions. 495 x 630mm. Small repairs.
The Americas, using the mapping of Charlevoix in Canada (including a North West Passage) and Condamine in Peru.
This item is currently on reserve


BRION DE LA TOUR, Louis. [Map of the Americas with a separately-printed border]
L'Amerique Dressée pour l'étude de la Geographie... Paris: Desnos, 1766. Original colour. Total printed area 285 x 315mm.
A decorative map of the Americas with a decorative title cartouche and a frame-like printed border. The map shows the North West Passage as a waterway t the Great Lakes.
This item is currently on reserve


 North America 

Anonymous. [Cook's voyage through the North Pacific]
Carte de la Partie Septentrionale de la Mer du Sud... Paris, c.1785. Coloured. 260 x 370mm. Repaired tear.
The north Pacific, with the route of Cook's Last Voyage marked. In 1778 he passed throught the Bering Strait but got blocked by the icepack. He turned south and met his death on Hawaii.
[Ref: 13562]    £150.00 ($203 • €167 rates)


 Eastern Seaboard 

BLAEU, Johannes. [The earliest obtainable view of New York City]
Nieuw Amsterdam op t Eylant Manhattans. Amsterdam, c.1650. Etching, printed border 75 x 310mm. Corner of left bottom margin repaired, not affecting printed area; otherwise a very fine example.
A rare and important early prospect of 'New Amsterdam', only the second view to be published and now the earliest available to the collector. It shows the Dutch colony at a time of crisis, when the Board of Nine sent a petition to the council of the Dutch West India Company complaining about conditions and mismanagement of the colony's affairs by the Director-General Peter Stuyvesant. Blaeu published this view not in one of his grand atlases but as a loose print, printed anonymously to accompany a political pamphlet, 'Vertoogh van Nieu-Neder-Land', which drew public attention to the plight of the New Amsterdam colonists under Stuyvesant. The colonists had sent Adriaen van der Donck to Amsterdam in 1649 to petition the Council with a written 'Remonstrance of the Commonality of New Netherland', asking for Stuyvesant to be recalled. It included this view of New Amsterdam to show the conditions in the small settlement, with only ten points worthy of inclusion in the key. These include the fort, windmill, flagpole (to guide ships to port), church, Company's Warehouse and, to emphasise the brutality of life there, the prison and gibbet complete with hanging body. The unlisted wooden 'crane' in the centre is a fire-basket signal pole for signalling at night. The 'Remonstrance' also included a map of the region showing how the colony was in danger of being overwhelmed by the English and calling for more aid. Van der Donck's map was copied and published by Jan Jansson (as 'Nova Belgii...', 1650); it and Blaeu's view were both originally issued anonymously because of the political implications of supporting a near-revolt in the colonies. Despite the support of the two publishers the 'Remonstrance' was ignored: Stuyvesant remained Director General until 1664, with a regime noted for its religious intolerance. In August that year the colony was taken by the English with only 450 men. A feature of Blaeu's etching is that it lacks a plate mark, having been one of several views printed from one printing plate and cut into separate sheets for issue. It soon became the standard view of New Amsterdam: shortly afterwards Nicolaes Visscher published a corrected version of Jansson's map and added the prospect in the bottom right corner and as he was the first publisher to admit to his work the 'New Amsterdam' became known as the Visscher view. In 1991 a pen, ink and watercolour sketch was uncovered in the Albertina Collection of the Austrian National Gallery, which is believed to be the prototype. DE KONING: From Van der Donck to Visscher (Mercator's World Vol 5, no 4, 2000).
[Ref: 15516]    £10,000.00 ($13,520 • €11,135 rates)


Records: 21 to 30 of 218
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