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Records: 21 to 30 of 55
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  AMERICA 
 Eastern Seaboard 

THORNTON, John. [Early English chart of Carolina]
A New Mapp of Carolina. London: W. & J. Mount and T. Page, 1748. 430 x 520mm.
An important English sea chart of the coasts of Carolina from Cape Charles south to near Hilton Head, orientated with north to the right. An inset detail shows the approaches to Charleston. The chart was first published in the 1689 edition of 'The English Pilot. The Fourth Book Describing The West India Navigation... Also, a New Description of Newfoundland, New-England, New-York, East and West New Jersey, Dellevar-Bay, Virginia, Maryland, and Carolina'. This was the first sea atlas of America containing charts only from English sources. Despite the numerous errors it remained the most popular chart of the area for well over fifty years. See SHIRLEY: Maps in the Atlases of the British Library, M.M&P-5c for an edition of the following year.
[Ref: 15471]    £4,250.00 ($5,568 • €4,777 rates)


BELLIN, Jacques-Nicolas. [Large 18th Century sea chart of the North Eastern Seaboard]
Carte Réduite des Costes Orientales de L'Amerique Septentrionale I.re Fueille contenant L'Isle Royale, L'Accadie, La Baye Françoise, La Nouvelle Angleterre et la Nouvelle Yorc.. Paris: Dépôt de la Marine, 1757. 585 x 870mm. A fine example.
Large and detailed chart of the Eastern Seaboard from New York north to Cape Breton and Price Edward Island. With an inset of Boston Harbour.
[Ref: 15988]    £1,850.00 ($2,424 • €2,079 rates)


Anonymous. [A map of Pennsylvania with an early use of 'Pittsburg']
Map of the Province of Pensilvania. London: T.Kinnersley, 1759, Sheet 135 x 210mm.
A map of the Province of Pennsylvania published to illustrate the conflict between the British, French and their native allies for control of the area during the Seven Years' War (known as the 'French and Indian War in America). In particular it marks Fort Duquesne, a French fort on the Ohio River. In September 1758 the British attacked the fort: an advanced force was crushed by the French, who then burned the fort and retreated before the main force arrived. The British then rebuilt it as Fort Pitt, which evolved into Pittsburgh. This map was published in 'The Grand Magazine of Magazines. or Universal Register', which was mostly written by David Henry. Published as a competitor to the 'Gentleman's Magazine', Henry appears not to have scruples about the sources of his illustrations; this map seems to have been adapted from Kitchin's map for the 'London Magazine', published in 1756, before these events. Thus this map is marked 'F.t du Quesne now called Pittsburg', a very early usage of the name.
[Ref: 14688]    £650.00 ($852 • €731 rates)


BURGIS, William. [A very scarce view of New York]
The South Prospect of the City of New York, in North America. Engrav'd For the London Magazine, 1761. London, 1761. 175 x 520mm. Binding folds flattened, tape marks in margins.
A scarce view of New York City from Long Island, lettered wih a 22-point key. Although the original index would have been in the text, it has been copied in pencil on the reverse: 1 Fort; 2 Chapel; 3 Secretary's Office; 4 Great Dock; 5 Ruins of Whitehall; 6 Part Nuttens Island (Governors Island); 7 Part Long Island; 8 The Lower Market; 9 The Crane; 10 Great Flesh Market; 11 Dutch Church; 12 English Church; 13 City Hall; 14 Exchange; 15 French Church; 16 Upper Market; 17 The Station Ship; 18 Wharf; 19 Wharf for Building Ships; 20 Ferry House, Long Island; 21 Cattle Pen; Col. Morris's Fancy turning to Windward. The view is based on a view drawn by William Burgis, engraved by John Harris on four plates measuring a total of 6 feet, and published in London c.1720. In 1746 Thomas Bakewell issued an updated edition, and this reduced version was copied from that to accompany a written account of New York, in the London Magazine, a monthly newspaper.
[Ref: 18913]    £3,500.00 ($4,585 • €3,934 rates)


BURGIS, William. [A very scarce view of New York]
The South Prospect of the City of New York, in America. Engrav'd For the London Magazine, 1761. London, c.1761. Some faded hand colour.175 x 520mm. Binding folds flattened.
A scarce view of New York City from Long Island, lettered wih a 22-point key. Although the original index would have been in the text, it has been copied in pencil on the reverse: 1 Fort; 2 Chapel; 3 Secretary's Office; 4 Great Dock; 5 Ruins of Whitehall; 6 Part Nuttens Island (Governors Island); 7 Part Long Island; 8 The Lower Market; 9 The Crane; 10 Great Flesh Market; 11 Dutch Church; 12 English Church; 13 City Hall; 14 Exchange; 15 French Church; 16 Upper Market; 17 The Station Ship; 18 Wharf; 19 Wharf for Building Ships; 20 Ferry House, Long Island; 21 Cattle Pen; Col. Morris's Fancy turning to Windward. The view is based on a view drawn by William Burgis, engraved by John Harris on four plates measuring a total of 6 feet, and published in London c.1720. In 1746 Thomas Bakewell issued an updated edition, and this reduced version was copied from that to accompany a written account of New York, in the London Magazine, a monthly newspaper. There are two near-identical plates, both dated 1761, but the other has 'North America' in the title. This is likely the later version, but he have been unable to ascertain when it was published.
This item is currently on reserve


HEAP, George. [A scarce 18th century prospect of Philadelphia]
The East Prospect of the City of Philadelphia, in the Province of Pennsylvania. Engraved for the London Magazine. London, 1761. 180 x 515mm. Binding folds flattened.
A view of the waterfront of Philadelphia, taken from the view by George Heap in 1752, engraved after Heap's death by Nicolas Scull, on four sheets, published 1754. In the top corners are two trompe l'oeil insets 'pinned' to the main view, the State House and the Battery. The view was published in the October issue of 'The London Magazine; or, Gentleman's Monthly Intelligencer'.
[Ref: 18915]    £1,600.00 ($2,096 • €1,798 rates)


ROBERTS, Bishop. [First edition of the earliest obtainable view of Charleston]
An Exact Prospect of Charlestown, the Metropolis of the Province of South Carolina. Engrav'd for the London Magazine. London, 1762. 180 x 525mm. Binding folds flattened, tape marks in margins.
The first printed prospect of Charleston, taken from across the Cooper River by Bishop Roberts, showing the town from Granville Bastion to Craven's Bastion, with ships filling the river and fishermen casting a net on the near shore. Although there is an eight-letter key, the index appeared in the magazine's text, not present here, but the features are: A Granville Bastion; B Court House; C Council Chamber; D Meeting House; E St Philip's Church; F Custom House; G Secretary's Office; H Craven's Bastion. Little is known about Bishop Roberts: in 1735 he advertised his services in the 'South Carolina Gazette': ''this is to give notice to all Gentlemen & others, that Portrait-painting and Engraving, Heraldry and House painting are undertaken and performed expeditiously in a good manner, and at the lowest rates, by B. Roberts''. He executed the watercolour on which this engraving is based at about this time, as it shows the buildings before the catastrophic fire of 1740. The watercolour (now in the Colonial Williamsburg Collection, acc. 1956-103) was sent to London, where it was engraved onto four plates by William Henry Toms and published in June 1739. As the four-sheet version of the prospect is extremely rare, perhaps because of the sudden death of Roberts in 1740, this smaller version has become the earliest prospect available to the collector. It was engraved to accompany a written account of Charleston, which stated: ''the merchants are opulent and well bred; the people are thriving and extensive, in dress and life; so that everything conspires to make this town the politest, as it is one of the richest in America''.
[Ref: 18911]    £6,500.00 ($8,515 • €7,306 rates)


MEAD, Braddock. [Large scale map of New England just prior to the American Revolution]
A Map of the most inhabited part of New England containing the Provinces of Massachusets Bay and New Hampshire, with the Colonies of Conecticut and Rhode Island, Divided into Counties and Townships: The whole composed from Actual Surveys and its Situation adjusted by Astronomical Observations. London: Thomas Jefferys, 1774. Original outline colour. Four sheets, dissected and laid on linen as one, 1050 x 1005mm. Laid on linen, slight wear at some edges.
A separate-issue map of New England, originally published in 1757, here re-issued during the increased tensions between Britain and her American colonies. The map shows the coast from Long Island Sound north to Casco Bay and inland to the Hudson River and Lake Champlain, with the 'Kats Kill Mountains'. The two inset maps are of Boston and its harbour, where the Boston Tea Party was staged less than a year before. The lack of an engraver's name has led to this map often being ascribed to the publisher, Thomas Jefferys: in fact it was actually drawn by his assistant, Braddock Mead (c.1685-1757), who used the pseudonym John Green to escape from a criminal past. Despite his imprisonment for defrauding an Irish heiress and charges of kidnapping, he seems to have higher standards than his contemporary cartographers: Cumming wrote that at a time 'when the quality and the ethics of map production were at a low ebb in England, he vigorously urged and practiced the highest standards; in the making of maps and navigational charts he was in advance of his time. CUMMING: p.45.
[Ref: 12336]    £5,000.00 ($6,550 • €5,620 rates)


LEIZELT, Balthasar Frederick. [An 18th century 'vue d'optique' of New York]
Vue de la Nouvelle Yorck Augsburg, c.1775. Original colour. 315 x 420mm. Some wear to the margins. An ink spot on the French side of the text.
An unusual 'vue d'optique', an imaginary view of the port of New York, with shipyards, docks and a large customs house. Below the image is an engraved description in both German and French which loosely translates to: "New York, a city in North America on the Island named Manhattan at the mouth of the Hudson River, which was first settled by the Dutch in 1615 and called New Amsterdam. In 1666 it was taken over by the British and named New York'. Because the print was designed as a 'vue d'optique' the title 'Vuë de la Nouvelle Yorck' is engraved in reverse above the scene. The sheet woud be be placed in a 'zograscope', an optical device that used lenses and mirrors to give perspective. but reversed the image.
[Ref: 18896]    £600.00 ($786 • €674 rates)


LEIZELT, Balthasar Frederick. [A 'vue d'optique' of Philadelphia]
Vuë de Philadelphie. Augsburg, c.1776, original colour, 315 x 420mm
An unusual and attractive 'vue d'optique' of Philadelphia taking as its actual model the Royal Naval Hospital at Greenwich, England. Philadelphia is fancifully represented as a seaport city with a naval skirmish taking place in the harbour. This type of print was designed to be looked at through a zograscope, an optical viewer that gave the prints a feeling of depth. The naive style of colouring is standard for these prints which were used to disseminate current affairs as well as for amusement. SNYDER, City of Independence: Views of Philadelphia Before 1800, 242.
[Ref: 10429]    £400.00 ($524 • €450 rates)


Records: 21 to 30 of 55
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