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 Eastern Seaboard 

Anonymous. [A map of Pennsylvania with an early use of 'Pittsburg']
Map of the Province of Pensilvania. London: T.Kinnersley, 1759, Sheet 135 x 210mm.
A map of the Province of Pennsylvania published to illustrate the conflict between the British, French and their native allies for control of the area during the Seven Years' War (known as the 'French and Indian War in America). In particular it marks Fort Duquesne, a French fort on the Ohio River. In September 1758 the British attacked the fort: an advanced force was crushed by the French, who then burned the fort and retreated before the main force arrived. The British then rebuilt it as Fort Pitt, which evolved into Pittsburgh. This map was published in 'The Grand Magazine of Magazines. or Universal Register', which was mostly written by David Henry. Published as a competitor to the 'Gentleman's Magazine', Henry appears not to have scruples about the sources of his illustrations; this map seems to have been adapted from Kitchin's map for the 'London Magazine', published in 1756, before these events. Thus this map is marked 'F.t du Quesne now called Pittsburg', a very early usage of the name.
[Ref: 14688]    £650.00 ($912 • €740 rates)

MEAD, Braddock. [Large scale map of New England just prior to the American Revolution]
A Map of the most inhabited part of New England containing the Provinces of Massachusets Bay and New Hampshire, with the Colonies of Conecticut and Rhode Island, Divided into Counties and Townships: The whole composed from Actual Surveys and its Situation adjusted by Astronomical Observations. London: Thomas Jefferys, 1774. Original outline colour. Four sheets, dissected and laid on linen as one, 1050 x 1005mm. Laid on linen, slight wear at some edges.
A separate-issue map of New England, originally published in 1757, here re-issued during the increased tensions between Britain and her American colonies. The map shows the coast from Long Island Sound north to Casco Bay and inland to the Hudson River and Lake Champlain, with the 'Kats Kill Mountains'. The two inset maps are of Boston and its harbour, where the Boston Tea Party was staged less than a year before. The lack of an engraver's name has led to this map often being ascribed to the publisher, Thomas Jefferys: in fact it was actually drawn by his assistant, Braddock Mead (c.1685-1757), who used the pseudonym John Green to escape from a criminal past. Despite his imprisonment for defrauding an Irish heiress and charges of kidnapping, he seems to have higher standards than his contemporary cartographers: Cumming wrote that at a time 'when the quality and the ethics of map production were at a low ebb in England, he vigorously urged and practiced the highest standards; in the making of maps and navigational charts he was in advance of his time. CUMMING: p.45.
[Ref: 12336]    £5,000.00 ($7,015 • €5,690 rates)

LEIZELT, Balthasar Frederick. Vuë De Philadelphie. Augsburg, c.1776, original colour, 315 x 420mm
An unusual and attractive 'vue d'optique' of Philadelphia taking as its actual model the Royal Naval Hospital at Greenwich, England. Philadelphia is fancifully represented as a seaport city with a naval skirmish taking place in the harbour. This type of print was designed to be looked at through a zograscope, a type of magic lantern which made the prints seem to be 3D. The naive style of colouring is standard for these prints which were used to disseminate current affairs as well as for amusement. SNYDER, City of Independence: Views of Philadelphia Before 1800, 242.
[Ref: 10429]    £400.00 ($561 • €455 rates)

DES BARRES, Joseph Frederick Wallet. [Des Barres's chart of Plymouth Bay, Massachusetts]
[Untitled chart of Plymouth Bay.] London: Des Barres, c.1777. Coloured. 660 x 490mm, paper watermarked 'J. Bates'. Minor split to centerfold which has been restored.
A chart of Plymouth Bay from the 'Atlantic Neptune', the first British sea atlas of the North American colonies and the first systematic survey of the east coast of North America. It shows in detail the environs of Plymouth, famous as the foundation colony of New England. Des Barres (1721-1824), a Swiss Huguenot, studied at Basle University before enrolling in the Royal Military Academy at Woolwich, where his studies iincluded surveying. On the outbreak of the Seven Years War iin 1756 he was commissioned into the 62nd Foot (Royal American) Regiment and was sent to Canada and participated in the capture of Louisbourg. He was then put to work surveying the St Lawrence River in preparation for Wolfe's attack on Quebec, then planning the defences of Halifax and other harbours, with a young James Cook as his assistant. With the end of the war in 1763 Colonel Des Barres spent the next decade charting the rest of Atlantic Canada. He returned to England in 1774 and was directed by the British Admiralty to create the 'Atlantic Neptune', a four-volume atlas to include his both work and that of other cartographers in the British colonies in America. On the completion of the atlas Des Barres returned to Canada, later becoming Lieut-Governor of Cape Breton Island. He died a month short of his 103rd birthday.
[Ref: 15122]    £4,750.00 ($6,664 • €5,406 rates)

FRY, Josua & JEFFERSON, Peter. [A French edition of an important map of Virginia]
Carte de la Virginie et du Maryland Dressée sur la grande carte Angloise de Josué Fry et Pierre Jefferson. Paris, Delamarche, c.1785. Original outline colour. 495 x 660mm.
Robert de Vaugondy's reduction of the important survey. In 1750 the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations ordered that each of the 13 Colonies should produce an accurate survey of their lands. As Fry & Jefferson were already surveying the border between Virginia and North Carolina they were chosen for this assignment. For the first time the interior regions beyond the tidewater were mapped, as was the complete Virginia river system.
[Ref: 10445]    £1,600.00 ($2,245 • €1,821 rates)

SOULES, Henri. [A near-contemporary plan of the Battle of Yorktown]
Plan d'York en Virginie avec les attaques et les Campemens de l'Armée combinée de France et d'Amerique. Paris: Buisson, 1787. Original colour. 300 x 390mm, on blue-tinted paper. Lower left margin, trimmed by binder and reinstated.
A plan of the last major battle of the American Revolution, when a joint Franco-American army forced the British army under General Cornwallis to surrender. It was published in 'Histoire des Troubles de L'Amerique Anglaise, Ecrite sur les Memoires les Plus Authentiques' by François Soules, regarded as the best French history of the war.
[Ref: 18299]    £800.00 ($1,122 • €910 rates)

ELLICOTT, Andrew. [The famous Ellicott's plan for Washington DC]
Plan of the City of Washington in the Territory of Columbia, ceded by the States of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the Seat of their Government after the Year 1800. London, 1795. 420 x 540mm. Binding folds flattened.
An early copy of Andrew Ellicott's map of the planned Federal capital, engraved by John Russell after the map by John Reid published in Winterbotham's 'An Historical Geographical, Commercial and Philosophical View of the United States' in 1795. It shows the layout of the streets in both Washington and Georgetown, with 'The President's House', National Mall and Capitol.
[Ref: 17920]    £3,200.00 ($4,490 • €3,642 rates)

CASSINI, Giovanni Maria. [Eighteenth century map of the USA]
Gli Stati Uniti dell'America Delineati sulle ultime Osservazioni... Rome, 1797. original colour. 365 x 490mm
Sheet two from Cassini's uncommon six-sheet map of the United States produced for the 'Nuovo Atlante Geografico Universale'. Showing parts of New England, Nova Scotia and Canada.
[Ref: 7817]    £450.00 ($631 • €512 rates)

BRUIN, Giovanni. [The Carolinas]
Carte Réduite des Côtes Orientales Del'Amérique Septentrionale Contenant partie du Nouveau Jersey, la Pen-sylvanie, le Mary-land, la Virginie, la Caroline Septentrionale, la Caroline Méridionale et la Georgie. Genova, Yves Gravier, c.1800. 575 x 855mm.
An Italian version of the Depot de la Marine chart of the Eastern Seaboard from Philadelphia to the St John's River in Florida. The western extent of the map is the Appalachian Mountains. The original map was published in 1780 specifically for the French Navy during the American War of Independence. This rare variation, engraved in Rome 1799, comes from Gravier's 'L'Atlas Maritime...'
[Ref: 7533]    £1,200.00 ($1,684 • €1,366 rates)

POULSON, John. [A scarce broadsheet guide to a forthcoming solar eclipse in Philadelphia]
Approaching Solar Eclipse. The lovers of Astronomical Science will perhaps be highly gratified with the opportunity which may on Monday be afforded them, of beholding this interesting phenomenon... Philadelphia: printed by John Poulson, n.d., but 1806. Letterpress broadsheet with wood-engraved diagram and border. Sheet 535 x 220mm. Repair to split in fold repaired with loss of a line of text; a few other letters mis-inked.
Broadsheet with a wood engraved diagram of the phases of the solar eclipse due on June 16, 1806, as seen from Philadelphia. The text starts: 'The Lovers of Astronomical Science will perhaps be highly gratified with the opportunity which may on Monday may be affored to them, of beholding this interesting phenonenon'.
[Ref: 11962]    £4,000.00 ($5,612 • €4,552 rates)

Records: 21 to 30 of 50
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