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Records: 31 to 40 of 400
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  WORLD 
 World Maps 

GILL, Leslie MacDonald. [The beginning of the 'Special Relationship']
The ''Time and Tide'' Map of the Atlantic Charter. London: George Philip & Son, 1943. Colour lithographic map. Sheet 900 x 1140mm. Laid on conservation canvas.
A large and decorative map of the world, published by 'Time and Tide' magazine to commemorate the signing of the 'Atlantic Charter' by Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt. The countries are marked with their commodities, shown in a large key. As well as quoting from the charter, there are other quotes about peace from Emmerson, Aristotle, Cicero and the Bible. The last is illustrated with a man using a sledgehammer on a tank, turning it into ploughshares. This policy statement, issued on 14th August 1941(four months before the U.S. entered the Second World War) set out the Allies' vision for cooperation in the post-war world. Not only did it cement the 'Special Relationship' of the U.S. and Britain, but it also led to the 'Declaration by United Nations' (1st January, 1942) which formed the basis of today's United Nations. Tom Harper of the British Library has described this as 'one of the key maps of the 20th century'. Leslie MacDonald Gill (1884-1947, known as Max), younger brother of Eric Gill, specialised in graphic design in the Arts and Crafts style. His most important commission was from the Imperial War Graves Commission, designing the script used on Commission headstones and war memorials, including the 'Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme'. His 'Wonderground Map of London', originally drawn as an advertising poster for London Electric Underground Railway Company in 1914, was such a success it is credited with saving the 'UndergrounD' advertising campaign.
[Ref: 18459]    £8,250.00 ($10,890 • €9,396 rates)


HORSEY, David. [A serio-comic map satirising Ronald Reagan's view of the World]
The World According to Ronald Reagan. Seattle: AA Graphics Inc., 1982. Lithographic map, printed in black and brown. Sheet 585 x 895mm.
A caricature map of the world, depicting President Reagan as a sheriff, his hands twitching over his six-guns as he eyes Leonid Brezhnev in the USSR. The president's figure fills an exaggerated California, with the rest of the U.S. divided between the Mid and South-West ('Republicans and Other Real Americans'), the North-east ('Democrats and Welfare Bums'), with a special mention for San Francisco ('Homos'). South of the border is 'Mariachi Land', El Salvador, 'Our Canal' and 'Banana Land'. Cuba is a 'Soviet Colony' and the Falklands Islands, in the year of the Falkland War against Argentina, are almost as big as South America. Across the Atlantic the UK is marked Thatcher Land, France is labelled 'Socialists and Pacifists' and Africa is divided between Egypt and 'Negroes'. In Asia, a huge Israel also contains Beirut; Arabia is marked 'Our Oil' and Persia 'Muslim Fanatics'; mainland China is 'Their China' and Taiwan 'Our China'; and and 'Japan Corporation' is shaped like a car. In the Indian Ocean is a compass rose, with a central image of Granny and her apple pie , cardinal points 'West (Us)' and 'East (Them)'. David Horsey (b. 1951) was an editorial cartoonist working for the Seattle Post Intelligencer when he drew this, the first of two world maps focusing on Reagan foreign policy (the second, 1987, shows Gorbachev as the rival gunslinger). He won the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning in 1999 and 2003. He now works for the Los Angeles Times.
[Ref: 18708]    £1,500.00 ($1,980 • €1,708 rates)


HORSEY, David. [A serio-comic map satirising Ronald Reagan's view of the World]
The World According to Ronald Reagan. Seattle: AA Graphics Inc., 1987. Lithographic map, printed in black and brown. Sheet 585 x 885mm.
A caricature map of the world, by depicting President Reagan as a sheriff, his figure filling an exaggerated California, hands twitching over his six-shooters. The rest of the U.S. is divided between the Mid and South-West ('Republicans and Other Real Americans'), the North-east ('Democrats and Welfare Bums') and Alaska ('Santa Claus'), with a special mention for San Francisco ('Homos'). Central and South America are 'Illegal Aliens', 'Contra Country' and 'Drug Pushers', with a portrait of Daniel Ortega; Africa, with a portrait of Gaddafi, is labelled 'Terrorists', 'Cuban Mercenaries' and 'White Folks' in apartheid South Africa. In Europe the UK is marked 'Thatcher Land', again with a portrait, containing 'Our Missiles'; France is labelled 'Socialists and Pacifist Wimps'; and Poland is 'Solidarity'. The USSR ('The Evil Empire' is filled with Gorbachev as a gun-slinger, with 'Their Missiles' and 'Ma's Cow'. Israel is over-sized and contains Beirut; Arabia is 'Our Oil'; Iran is 'Muslim Maniacs' with 'Our Arms Shipments'; China 'Good Commies'; and 'Japan Inc' is shaped like a car. In the Indian Ocean is a compass rose, with a central image of Granny and her apple pie, and cardinal points of 'North (Rich)', 'West (Us)', 'South (Poor' and 'East (Them)'. David Horsey (b. 1951) was an editorial cartoonist working for the Seattle Post Intelligencer when he drew this, the second of two world maps focusing on Reagan foreign policy (the first, 1982, shows Brezhnev as his foe). He won the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning in 1999 and 2003. He now works for the Los Angeles Times.
[Ref: 18451]    £1,400.00 ($1,848 • €1,594 rates)


 Polar Maps 

HONDIUS, Jodocus. [Mercator's North Pole from the 'Atlas Minor']
Polus Arcticus cum vicinis regionibus. Amsterdam, 1610, Latin text edition. Coloured. 135 x 185mm.
A reduction of Mercator's famous map of the Arctic, first published in the 'Atlas Minor' of 1607. The three roundel inset maps show the Faroe Islands, the Shetlands and the mythical island of Frisland. In 1621 the printing plate was sold to a London publisher, who republished it in 'Purchas His Pilgrimies'. Later Dutch editions used new plates by Jansson.
[Ref: 18284]    £525.00 ($693 • €598 rates)


MERCATOR, Gerard. [Mercator's famous map of the Arctic]
Septentrionalium Terrarum descriptio. Amsterdam, Henricus Hondius, 1628. French text edition. Old colour. 365 x 390mm. Wormhole repaired to left margin.
The first map of the Arctic Circle, with both the North Pole and Magnetic North depicted as rocky islands. Mercator has included the latest voyages in search of the North West and North East Passages, marking the discoveries of Frobisher and Davis around Greenland. Within the roundels of the decorative borders are maps of the Shetlands, Faeroes and the mythical island of Friesland. This second state (post-1606) improves the outline of Nova Zembla, making it one island, and has one of the polar islands receding to allow the inclusion of Spitzbergen. A classic decorative map. BURDEN: 88; KOEMAN: Me 28a.
[Ref: 18925]    £2,400.00 ($3,168 • €2,733 rates)


PITT, Moses. [The only original map in Pitt's 'English Atlas']
A Map of the North-Pole and the Parts Adjoining. Oxford: Moses Pitt, 1680. Coloured. 460 x 590mm. A few small repairs, pinholes in crest.
A scarce map of the Arctic Circle, with the title on a curtain, with portraits of Lapplanders and a whaling scene. On the map the mythical island of Frisland is marked, as is a strait through Greenland, placed there instead of Canada by Martin Frobisher, who had been confused by the non-existence of Frisland. Further west the discoveries of the English explorers looking for the North West Passage are shown. Bottom left are the arms of Charles FitzCharles (1657-80), the son of Charles II, which consists of his father's arms with a baton sinister vair overall, signifying illegitimacy. He died of dysentery defending Tangier, which had been part of his father's dowry when marrying the Portuguese princess Catherine of Braganza in 1662.
[Ref: 17805]    £4,500.00 ($5,940 • €5,125 rates)


COOK, Captain James. [HODGES, William.]
The Ice Islands, seen the 9th of Jan.ry 1773. London: Strahan and Cadell, 1777. 245 x 395mm.
An illustration to Cook's 'A Voyage towards the South Pole', showing 'Resolution'a longboats collecting ice for drinking water and shooting at sea birds. On his Second Voyage (1772-5) James Cook circumnavigated the world as far south as he could, attempting to locate any 'Terra Australis Incognita'.
[Ref: 17118]    £150.00 ($198 • €171 rates)


  AMERICA 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The first atlas map devoted to America]
Tabula Terre Nove. Strasbourg, Johannes Shott, 1513. Woodcut, printed area 385 x 445mm, paper watermarked with a fleur de lis, with good margins. Near mint condition
The rare first issue of Wäldseemüller's famous 'Admiral's map', the first printed atlas map specifically of the Americas. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. The twenty place names in North America suggest his sources were Portuguese, particularly the Cantino chart of 1502 and Caveri of c.1505. As the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida Peninsula appear before recorded voyages to either, this map is regarded as evidence of forgotten expeditions. It was Wäldseemüller's wall map of the world (1507) that first used the name 'America', although he was only using it for the parts of South America explored by Amerigo Vespucci. However others started using the name for the whole of the New World and here Wäldseemüller is trying to make amends: a Latin note reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. BURDEN: 3.
[Ref: 17346]    £65,000.00 ($85,800 • €74,029 rates)


WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The Fries version of Wäldseemüller's 'Admiral's map' of the Americas]
[Tabula Terræ Novæ .] Vienne: Michael Servetus, 1541. Woodcut, printed area 285 x 430mm. A very fine example.
One of the earliest obtainable maps to show the New World, this example being the fourth and last issue of the Fries reduction of Wäldseemüller's famous map, which is the first printed atlas map devoted to the Americas and said to have been compiled with the assistance of Columbus himself. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. In his version Fries added a Spanish flag over Cuba and a vignette scene in South America depicting cannibals and an opossum, both reported by Vespucci. It was Wäldseemüller's world map of 1507 that first used the name 'America', placing in southern South America, after Vespucci, who explored that region and proved it was not part of Asia. When the name began to be used for the entire landmass Wäldseemüller used this map to emphasise Columbus's importance: a Latin text above 'Terra Nova' reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. This map was originally intended not for an edition of Ptolemy but for a new 'Chronica mundi' being written by Wäldseemüller: his death c.1520 caused the project to be shelved, so the woodcuts were used to publish a smaller sized and so cheaper edition of the 'Geography'. The title, as above, is on the reverse within a plain border. BURDEN: 4.
[Ref: 18827]    £8,500.00 ($11,220 • €9,681 rates)


MUNSTER, Sebastian. [The first map of America as a continent]
Tabula novarum insularum, quas diversis respectibus Occidentales & Indianas vocant. Basle, Henri Petri, 1550. Latin edition. Woodcut, image size 270 x 340mm. Tiny paper repair on top margin, else excellent.
Munster's landmark map, the first to attempt to show America as a continent, yet demonstrating how little was known. On the map a narrow isthmus divides the Atlantic and Pacific in the region of the Carolinas, based on Verrazzano, and Yucatan is an island. The large island of Zipangri off the west coast is not California but Japan, based on the narrative of Marco Polo but a few years before any recorded visit to the islands by Europeans. The large vignette ship is the 'Victoria', the only survivor of Magellan's fleet of four. This is an example of the 5th state of 13, despite being published only ten years after the first issue. BURDEN: 12.
[Ref: 18709]    £4,650.00 ($6,138 • €5,296 rates)


Records: 31 to 40 of 400
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