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Records: 31 to 40 of 360
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  WORLD 
 World Maps 

PERTHES, Justus. [An agricultural world map]
Verbreitungsbezirke Der Wichtigsten Kulturgewachse; Nebst Andeutungen Uber Den Lauf Der Isotheren Und Isochimenen Gotha, 1851. Original colour 340 x 430mm.
The large maps shows the distribution of grains throughout the world. The four smaller maps shows the distributions of sugar, coffee, pepper, tea and vanilla. Decorated with drawings of plants and flowers.
[Ref: 17269]    £150.00 ($199 • €169 rates)


PERTHES, Justus. [A map of the animals of the world]
Geographische Verbreitung. Gotha, 1851. Original colour. 340 x 430mm.
Map of the world with illustrations of animals down each side with niote on their population throughtout the world, including elephants, monkeys and rhinoceroses.
[Ref: 17274]    £150.00 ($199 • €169 rates)


ANDRIVEAU-GOUJON, J. [A very large 19th Century double-hemisphere world map on four sheets]
Mappemonde en deux Hémisphères. L'État actuel des connaissances Géographiques et les derniers Voyages Autour du Monde. Paris, 1853. Coloured steel engraving, printed on four sheets conjoined, total 980 x 1310mm.
A large scale double-hemisphere world map published in the middle of the 19th century, with decorative embellishments top and bottom. This map was usually issued separately as a folding map, although this is the rare uncut example, which was probably bound into Andriveau Goujon's scarce 'Atlas Choix'
[Ref: 17503]    £2,500.00 ($3,313 • €2,815 rates)


MENETRIER, F. [A double-hemisphere wall map of the world illustrated with costumes]
Le Petit Journal. Mappemonde. Paris, c.1900. Colour-printed wood engraving. 940 x 1095mm. Minor repairs to folds.
A highly decorative map of the world, with a vignette scene from each continent in the corners and cusps, including an American paddle steamer, and eighty-one costumes from around the world in three rows. On the map the shipping routes are marked with sailing times, for example London to Australia and New Zealand in 45 days. As this map was published as a supplement to the French 'Petit Journal' the ephemeral nature of this map makes surviving examples very unusual.
[Ref: 16005]    £4,500.00 ($5,963 • €5,067 rates)


BACON, George Washington. [Wall map of the world at the beginning of the 20th century]
Bacon's New Chart of the World. Mercator's Projection. London: G.W. Bacon & Co., c.1907. Colour lithographic map. Dissected and laid on linen as issued , total 950 x 1200mm, folded into original covers
A large map of the world, showing the British Empire, at its height, marked in red. Around the map are inset details: with plans of towns including Hong Kong, Singapore, Sydney and New York; the Panama and Suez Canals; the British Isles; the two Poles; and a Universal Time Chart. Along the top are a selection of national flags and ensigns; along the bottom are Gazetteers and a list of Principal British Steamship lines.
[Ref: 17993]    £1,000.00 ($1,325 • €1,126 rates)


GILL, Leslie MacDonald. [A vivid poster map advertising the GPO's communication network]
Post Office Radio-Telephone Services. London: His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1935. Colour lithograph, 990 x 1230mm. A small chip in bottom margin otherwise near mint.
A colourful map of the world, on an azimuthal projection, although Gill has chosen to depict two Antarcticas (one under Australia, the other under South America) rather than stretch the ice out across the bottom of the map. The British Empire is shown in red. In various places around the map are scrolls with literary quotes relating to travel from Ovid, Wolfe, Tennyson and, of course, Shakespeare: his ''I’ll put a girdle round about the Earth in forty minutes'' (Robin, 'A Midsummer Night’s Dream') is placed in the Pacific. Under the map are five roundel illustrations: 'Rugby Radio Station, Telephony Transmitter Room'; 'R.R.S. Main Power House'; 'Faraday Building, London'; R.R.S. Aerial Tuning Inductance'; and 'R.R.S. Demountable Valve'. Bottom right is the new logo of the GPO, also designed by Gill. The company must have been pleased with the result, as the GPO commissioned another map, with the same map projection for their Steamship Routes in 1937. Leslie MacDonald Gill (1884-1947, known as Max), younger brother of Eric Gill, specialised in graphic design in the Arts and Crafts style. His most important commission was from the Imperial War Graves Commission, designing the script used on Commission headstones and war memorials, including the 'Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme'. His 'Wonderground Map of London', originally drawn as an advertising poster for London Electric Underground Railway Company in 1914, was such a success it is credited with saving the 'UndergrounD' advertising campaign.
[Ref: 17915]    £6,000.00 ($7,950 • €6,756 rates)


 Polar Maps 

CLOPPENBURG, Johannes. [A reduced copy of Mercator's famous map of the Arctic Circle]
Septentrionalium Terrarum Descriptio. Amsterdam, 1632, Latin text edition. Coloured. 190 x 260mm. Worm hole in right edge margin filled.
A scarce reduced version of Mercator's map of the Arctic Circle, with four roundel insets, containing three maps (the Shetlands, the mythical island of Frisland and the Faroes) and the title. On the map an island in the Anian Straits is marked as the magnetic pole. The map was issued in Cloppenburg's edition of Mercator's 'Atlas Minor', with maps engraved in slightly larger format by Pieter van den Keere. First published in 1630, there was a third edition in 1636 before a hiatus until an edition in 1673, suggesting the plates were supressed. BURDEN: 225, first state of three.
[Ref: 17984]    £820.00 ($1,087 • €923 rates)


PITT, Moses. [The only original map in Pitt's 'English Atlas']
A Map of the North-Pole and the Parts Adjoining. Oxford: Moses Pitt, 1680. Coloured. 460 x 590mm. A few small repairs, pinholes in crest.
A scarce map of the Arctic Circle, with the title on a curtain, with portraits of Lapplanders and a whaling scene. On the map the mythical island of Frisland is marked, as is a strait through Greenland, placed there instead of Canada by Martin Frobisher, who had been confused by the non-existence of Frisland. Further west the discoveries of the English explorers looking for the North West Passage are shown. Bottom left are the arms of Charles FitzCharles (1657-80), the son of Charles II, which consists of his father's arms with a baton sinister vair overall, signifying illegitimacy. He died of dysentery defending Tangier, which had been part of his father's dowry when marrying the Portuguese princess Catherine of Braganza in 1662.
[Ref: 17805]    £4,500.00 ($5,963 • €5,067 rates)


  AMERICA 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. Tabula Terre Nove. Strassburg, Johannes Shott, 1513. Woodcut, printed area 385 x 445mm, paper watermarked with a fleur de lis, with good margins.
The rare first issue of Wäldseemüller's famous 'Admiral's map', the first printed atlas map specifically of the Americas. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. The twenty place names in North America suggest his sources were Portuguese, particularly the Cantino chart of 1502 and Caveri of c.1505. As the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida Peninsula appear before recorded voyages to either, this map is regarded as evidence of forgotten expeditions. It was Wäldseemüller's wall map of the world map (1507) that first used the name 'America', although he was only using it for the parts of South America explored by Amerigo Vespucci. However others started using the name for the whole of the New World and here Wäldseemüller is trying to make amends: a Latin note reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. This is the best example of this landmark map we have ever seen. BURDEN: 3.
[Ref: 17346]   P.O.A.


WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The Fries version of Wäldseemüller's 'Admiral's map' of the Americas]
[Tabula Terræ Novæ .] Vienne: Michael Servetus, 1541. Woodcut, printed area 285 x 430mm.
One of the earliest obtainable maps to show the New World, this example being the fourth and last issue of the Fries reduction of Wäldseemüller's famous map, which is the first printed atlas map devoted to the Americas and said to have been compiled with the assistance of Columbus himself. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. In his version Fries added a Spanish flag over Cuba and a vignette scene in South America depicting cannibals and an opossum, both reported by Vespucci. It was Wäldseemüller's world map of 1507 that first used the name 'America', placing in southern South America, after Vespucci, who explored that region and proved it was not part of Asia. When the name began to be used for the entire landmass Wäldseemüller used this map to emphasise Columbus's importance: a Latin text above 'Terra Nova' reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. This map was originally intended not for an edition of Ptolemy but for a new 'Chronica mundi' being written by Wäldseemüller: his death c.1520 caused the project to be shelved, so the woodcuts were used to publish a smaller sized and so cheaper edition of the 'Geography'. The title, as above, is on the reverse within a plain border. BURDEN: 4.
[Ref: 17900]    £9,750.00 ($12,919 • €10,979 rates)


Records: 31 to 40 of 360
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