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Records: 31 to 40 of 132
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  LONDON 
 London Maps 

NEELE, S.J. [Map of London as it was in 1563]
London and Westminster in the Reign of Queen Elizabeth Anno Dom 1563. London, c. 1793. Coloured. 210 x 550mm.
A map of Elizabethan London, with the buildings shown in perspective, based on the large woodcut plan of London of c.1560 attributed to Ralph Agas. Covent Garden is shown as an area of fields named 'Convent Garden' as it belonged to the Abbey of St Peter's at Westminster. St Paul's, The Globe and the Tower of London are marked on the map.
[Ref: 16979]    £650.00 ($845 • €748 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [Knightsbridge from an important large-scale survey of London]
[Knightsbridge.] London: 1794. 565 x 525mm.
A plan of Knightsbridge from what Howgego describes as the 'largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century', on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. It shows Hyde Park and the Serpentine, with Knightsbridge, the Brompton Road and Sloane Street. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 14121]    £600.00 ($780 • €690 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [A detailed plan of Fitzrovia with a view of the 'New Road']
[Fitzrovia .] London: 1793-4. 565 x 525mm. Very fine condition.
Sheet 1B from Horwood's survey of London, on a scale of 26 inches to a mile, covering Fitzrovia, in an early state, with a separately-printed propect of the country north of 'The New Road from Paddington' (Euston Road), which was dropped from the completed map. The area mapped is from Tottenham Court Road west to Devonshire Place, marking Fitzroy Square (without the central garden in the completed map). There is little development north of the Euston Road, but of interest is 'Jews Harp House', a coffee house that was a hot-bed of Jacobin insurrection. William Blake refers to it and the farm shown nearby in his poem 'Jerusalem': 'The Jews-harp-house & the Green Man; / The Ponds here Boys to bathe delight: / The fields of Cows by Willans farm: Shine in Jerusalems pleasant sight'. Within twenty years both had disappeared as the area was developed as Regent's Park. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22, the 'largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century',
[Ref: 16924]    £750.00 ($975 • €863 rates)


STOCKDALE, John. [A late 18th century wall map of London]
A New Plan of London, XXIX Miles in Circumference. London: Stockdale, 1797-1809. Coloured. Four sheets conjoined, total 1020 x 1460mm. Publication line slightly trimmed at bottom.
A large and detailed map of London, first issued in 1797, this example updated c.1809 but retaining the original publication date. Engraved by S. J. Neele, the '29 miles' encompasses Kensington Palace in the west clockwide to Hampstead, Kentish Town, Clapton, Stratford, Poplar, Greenwich, Camberwell & Chelsea. This state has the East and West India Docks added and the planned Vauxhall Bridge and Road marked (opened 1816). The outline of Regent's Park, created when the farm leases expired in 1811, has yet to appear. Thus 'Jew's Harp House', a tea house mentioned in William Blake's epic poem 'Jerusalem', is still marked. HOWGEGO No. 213 1(a).
[Ref: 15719]    £8,500.00 ($11,050 • €9,775 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [Westminster and Lambeth from an important large-scale survey of London]
[Westminster & Lambeth.] London: 1799 Two sheets conjoined, total 570 x 1010mm. Some original outline colour. Top corners repaired with some fill.
Two sheets from a map which Howgego describes as the "largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century", on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. The western part of the map shows the eastern end of St James's Park, with part of Pall Mall, Charing Cross with the King's Mews, Westminster Abbey and Hall, Great Peter Street and what is now Smith Square. Across Westminster Bridge Lambeth is shown, with St George's Circus and King's Bench Prison. Further north the Thames riverside is filled with timber yards where the South Bank Centre now stands. Near Westminster Bridge is Astley's Theatre, dedicated to equestrian shows. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 12670]    £1,100.00 ($1,430 • €1,265 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [The City and Whitechapel from an important large-scale survey of London]
[The City and Whitechapel.] London: 1799. Two sheets conjoined, total 570 x 1010mm. Some original outline colour. Top corners repaired with some fill.
The City and Whitechapel from a map Howgego describes as the "largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century", on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. Among the landmarks are the Bank of England & the Royal Exchange, Guildhall, Moorfields and Tower Hill. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 12671]    £1,200.00 ($1,560 • €1,380 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [Walworth from an important large-scale survey of London]
[Walworth, with the Old Kent Road.] London: 1799. Two sheets conjoined, total 570 x 1010mm. Some original outline colour. Top corners repaired with some fill.
Walworth, in the Borough of Southwark, with Walworth Road, the Old Kent Road and Grange Road. At the time of publication Walworth Common was open land; now it is completely developed. Howgego describes Horwood's map as the "largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century", on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 12672]    £550.00 ($715 • €633 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [Marylebone & St Pancras from an important large-scale survey of London]
[Marylebone & St Pancras .] London: 1794-5. Two sheets conjoined, total 570 x 1010mm. Some original outline colour. Top corners repaired.
Marylebone & St Pancras from a map that Howgego describes as the "largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century", on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. 'The New Road from Paddington' (Euston Road) is shown from Tottenham Court Road west to Lisson Grove (birthplace of Eliza Doolittle in Shaw's 'Pygmalion). Also marked are Fitzroy Square, Warren Street, Harley Street, Baker Street and the Workhouse where the University of Westminster now stands. There is little development north of the Euston Road, but of interest is 'Jews Harp House', a coffee house that was a hot-bed of Jacobin insurrection. William Blake refers to it and the farm shown nearby in his poem 'Jerusalem': 'The Jews-harp-house & the Green Man; / The Ponds here Boys to bathe delight: / The fields of Cows by Willans farm: Shine in Jerusalems pleasant sight'. Within twenty years both had disappeared as the area was developed as Regent's Park. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 12668]    £900.00 ($1,170 • €1,035 rates)


BOWLES & CARVER. [Town plan of London at the beginning of the 19th century]
Bowles's One-Sheet Plan of the Cities of London and Westminster with the Borough of Southwark; comprehending their Outskirts and Extent of the Thames from Chelsea to Deptford. Exhibiting also the New Buildings, Roads, and other Alterations. London: Bowles & Carver, 1806. Coloured. Dissected and laid on linen, total 440 x 640mm.
A detailed map of London with a title cartouche featuring surveyors and their tools. The extents of the plan are Hyde Park clockwise to Islington, Limehouse & Walworth. HOWGEGO No. 181, state 11of 14.
[Ref: 15347]    £1,300.00 ($1,690 • €1,495 rates)


COOKE, John. [The creation of Finsbury Circus by George Dance]
Improvements Proposed [by T]he Hon. Corporation of London between the Royal Exchange and Finsbury Square. London, 1803. Original colour. Sheet 515 x 370mm. Trimmed into title on top left.
A plan submited by architect George Dance the Younger (1741-1825), this a grand 'London Amphitheatre' that eventually became Finsbury Circus in the City of London. A text reads: 'The principal improvements proposed by this Plan are as follows, viz The removal of Bedlam Hospital to a more healthy situation without the Town, the present building being found unfit to stand. The erection of an Amphitheatrical Area 500 by 400 Feet, on Quarters of Moorfields including the scite which the Hospital of Bedlam now occupies, and would admit of upwards of Sixty Houses fit for the habitation of opulent Citizens, with Gardens, Coach houses & stables, annexed. The whole connected with the most interesting part of the City, by a new Street 80 feet wide leading directly from the Amphitheatre to the Royal Exchange'.
[Ref: 15984]    £750.00 ($975 • €863 rates)


Records: 31 to 40 of 132
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