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Records: 31 to 40 of 94
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  AMERICA 
 Eastern Seaboard 

HOMANN, Johann Baptist. [The English colonies on the north-east seaboard of America]
Nova Anglia Septentrionali Americæ implantata Anglorumque coloniis florentissima. Nuremberg, c.1725. Original body colour. 495 x 600mm.
Decorative map of New England, with Lake Champlain much too large. This map appeared at a time of high emigration from Germany to the Americas: it has been suggested that the large title cartouche, showing an Indian trading with a European surrounded by the wealth of the Americas, was an attempt to persuade more to seek their fortunes in the New World.
[Ref: 11207]    £1,450.00 ($1,900 • €1,650 rates)


BOWEN, Emanuel. [The first printed map of Georgia]
A New Map of Georgia, with Part of Carolina, Florida and Louisiana. Drawn from Original Draughts, assisted by the most approved Maps and Charts. Collected by Eman: Bowen Geographer to his Majesty. London, 1748. 370 x 480mm.
The first map of Georgia, published only fifteen years after the colony's foundation by James Oglethorpe on February 12th 1733. It shows Charleston west to the Mississippi, and south to New Orleans and Cape Canaveral in Florida, marking the lands of the tribes both friendly and hostile and known trails. The borders of the province with Florida and Louisiana are purposefully vague (the 'G' of Georgia is west of Mississippi) as there had been no negotiation with the Spanish. Indeed, such was the expectation of war that Oglethorpe originally banned slavery as a security risk. The map was published in the 1748 edition of John Harris’ 'Navigantium atque Itinerantium Bibliotheca, or Complete Collection of Voyages and Travels', which contained a new chapter dedicated to Georgia, for which this map was engraved. As this was the official account of the colony, Bowen had access to the maps made by the colonists themselves. CUMMING: 267, Colour Plate 18.
[Ref: 15278]    £2,800.00 ($3,668 • €3,186 rates)


SOUTHACK, Cyprian. [An English two-sheet sea chart of New England]
A Correct Map of the Coast of New England 1731. London: W. & J. Mount and T. Page, 1748. Two sheets conjoined, total 470 x 1080mm. Original folds flattened. A very fine example.
A reduced version of Southack's incredibly rare eight-sheet chart of New England. It shows from Sandy Hook to the southern tip of Cape Breton, with an inset detail of Boston Harbour. Cyprian Southack (1662-1745) emigrated to Boston in 1686, where he acted as a privateer during King William's War (1688-97), before being appointed commander of the 'Province Galley', the only ship of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay's navy. After the war he continued producing charts of British territory in America, as far north as Newfoundland, This chart was published in 'The English Pilot. The Fourth Book Describing The West India Navigation... Also, a New Description of Newfoundland, New-England, New-York, East and West New Jersey, Dellevar-Bay, Virginia, Maryland, and Carolina'. This was the first sea atlas of America containing charts only from English sources. Such was the importance of this map that Mount and Page had a new plate copied for the 1775 edition. See SHIRLEY: Maps in the Atlases of the British Library, M.M&P-5c for an edition of the following year.
[Ref: 15466]    £7,500.00 ($9,825 • €8,535 rates)


THORNTON, John. [Early English chart of the environs of Chesapeake Bay]
Virginia, Maryland, Pennsilvania, East & West New Jersey. London: W. & J. Mount and T. Page, 1748. Two sheets conjoined, total 510 x 800mm. A good impression.
A large chart of the coasts around Chesapeake Bay, orientated with north to the right, showing from Staten Island south to Cape Henry, marking Philadelphia and Baltimore. It was drawn by John Thornton after the chart by Augustine Herman, with additions from other sources. Herman (c,1621-1686), a Bohemian cartographer, worked for Cecil Calvert (1605-75), 2nd Baron Baltimore, the first Proprietor of the Province of Maryland. As a reward he was allowed to establish a plantation, 'Bohemian Manor', now Chesapeake City, Maryland, shown on this chart. Thorton's version was first published in the 1689 edition of 'The English Pilot. The Fourth Book Describing The West India Navigation', the first sea atlas of America containing charts only from English sources. Mount and Page had this new plate engraved in 1742 . See BURDEN: 667.
[Ref: 15467]    £5,000.00 ($6,550 • €5,690 rates)


THORNTON, John. [Early English chart of Carolina]
A New Mapp of Carolina. London: W. & J. Mount and T. Page, 1748. 430 x 520mm.
An important English sea chart of the coasts of Carolina from Cape Charles south to near Hilton Head, orientated with north to the right. An inset detail shows the approaches to Charleston. The chart was first published in the 1689 edition of 'The English Pilot. The Fourth Book Describing The West India Navigation... Also, a New Description of Newfoundland, New-England, New-York, East and West New Jersey, Dellevar-Bay, Virginia, Maryland, and Carolina'. This was the first sea atlas of America containing charts only from English sources. Despite the numerous errors it remained the most popular chart of the area for well over fifty years. See SHIRLEY: Maps in the Atlases of the British Library, M.M&P-5c for an edition of the following year.
[Ref: 15471]    £4,250.00 ($5,568 • €4,837 rates)


BELLIN, Jacques-Nicolas. [Large 18th Century sea chart of the North Eastern Seaboard]
Carte Réduite des Costes Orientales de L'Amerique Septentrionale I.re Fueille contenant L'Isle Royale, L'Accadie, La Baye Françoise, La Nouvelle Angleterre et la Nouvelle Yorc.. Paris: Dépôt de la Marine, 1757. 585 x 870mm. A fine example.
Large and detailed chart of the Eastern Seaboard from New York north to Cape Breton and Price Edward Island. With an inset of Boston Harbour.
[Ref: 15988]    £1,850.00 ($2,424 • €2,105 rates)


Anonymous. [A map of Pennsylvania with an early use of 'Pittsburg']
Map of the Province of Pensilvania. London: T.Kinnersley, 1759, Sheet 135 x 210mm.
A map of the Province of Pennsylvania published to illustrate the conflict between the British, French and their native allies for control of the area during the Seven Years' War (known as the 'French and Indian War in America). In particular it marks Fort Duquesne, a French fort on the Ohio River. In September 1758 the British attacked the fort: an advanced force was crushed by the French, who then burned the fort and retreated before the main force arrived. The British then rebuilt it as Fort Pitt, which evolved into Pittsburgh. This map was published in 'The Grand Magazine of Magazines. or Universal Register', which was mostly written by David Henry. Published as a competitor to the 'Gentleman's Magazine', Henry appears not to have scruples about the sources of his illustrations; this map seems to have been adapted from Kitchin's map for the 'London Magazine', published in 1756, before these events. Thus this map is marked 'F.t du Quesne now called Pittsburg', a very early usage of the name.
[Ref: 14688]    £650.00 ($852 • €740 rates)


MEAD, Braddock. [Large scale map of New England just prior to the American Revolution]
A Map of the most inhabited part of New England containing the Provinces of Massachusets Bay and New Hampshire, with the Colonies of Conecticut and Rhode Island, Divided into Counties and Townships: The whole composed from Actual Surveys and its Situation adjusted by Astronomical Observations. London: Thomas Jefferys, 1774. Original outline colour. Four sheets, dissected and laid on linen as one, 1050 x 1005mm. Laid on linen, slight wear at some edges.
A separate-issue map of New England, originally published in 1757, here re-issued during the increased tensions between Britain and her American colonies. The map shows the coast from Long Island Sound north to Casco Bay and inland to the Hudson River and Lake Champlain, with the 'Kats Kill Mountains'. The two inset maps are of Boston and its harbour, where the Boston Tea Party was staged less than a year before. The lack of an engraver's name has led to this map often being ascribed to the publisher, Thomas Jefferys: in fact it was actually drawn by his assistant, Braddock Mead (c.1685-1757), who used the pseudonym John Green to escape from a criminal past. Despite his imprisonment for defrauding an Irish heiress and charges of kidnapping, he seems to have higher standards than his contemporary cartographers: Cumming wrote that at a time 'when the quality and the ethics of map production were at a low ebb in England, he vigorously urged and practiced the highest standards; in the making of maps and navigational charts he was in advance of his time. CUMMING: p.45.
[Ref: 12336]    £5,000.00 ($6,550 • €5,690 rates)


LEIZELT, Balthasar Frederick. [An 18th century 'vue d'optique' of New York]
Vue de la Nouvelle Yorck Augsburg, c.1775. Original colour. 315 x 420mm. Some wear to the margins. An ink spot on the French side of the text.
An unusual 'vue d'optique', an imaginary view of the port of New York, with shipyards, docks and a large customs house. Below the image is an engraved description in both German and French which loosely translates to: "New York, a city in North America on the Island named Manhattan at the mouth of the Hudson River, which was first settled by the Dutch in 1615 and called New Amsterdam. In 1666 it was taken over by the British and named New York'. Because the print was designed as a 'vue d'optique' the title 'Vuë de la Nouvelle Yorck' is engraved in reverse above the scene. The sheet woud be be placed in a 'zograscope', an optical device that used lenses and mirrors to give perspective. but reversed the image.
[Ref: 18896]    £600.00 ($786 • €683 rates)


LEIZELT, Balthasar Frederick. [A 'vue d'optique' of Philadelphia]
Vuë de Philadelphie. Augsburg, c.1776, original colour, 315 x 420mm
An unusual and attractive 'vue d'optique' of Philadelphia taking as its actual model the Royal Naval Hospital at Greenwich, England. Philadelphia is fancifully represented as a seaport city with a naval skirmish taking place in the harbour. This type of print was designed to be looked at through a zograscope, an optical viewer that gave the prints a feeling of depth. The naive style of colouring is standard for these prints which were used to disseminate current affairs as well as for amusement. SNYDER, City of Independence: Views of Philadelphia Before 1800, 242.
[Ref: 10429]    £400.00 ($524 • €455 rates)


Records: 31 to 40 of 94
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