Follow us on

facebook link

Altea Gallery on Twitter

Altea Gallery on Twitter

Records: 31 to 40 of 48
« previous 1 2 3 4 5 next »
  DECORATIVE 
 Decorative Items 

ALEPH [HARVEY, William]. [Pictorial map of Denmark]
Denmark. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1869. 250 x 210mm.
Anthropomorphic map of Denmark. The text below the image reads, ''For Shakespeare's Prince, and the Princess of Wales, To England dear. Her royal spirit quails; From skating faint, she rests upon the snow; Shrinking from unclean beasts hat grin below''. It was published in 'Geographical Fun', a charming atlas of caricature maps of European counties, drawn, according to the preface, by a fifteen-year-old girl to amuse her sick brother. The author was, however, William Harvey (1796-1873), a London Doctor and Journalist, best-known for his book 'London Scenes and London People', 1863. The maps contain many references to the political changes sweeping through continental Europe, with representations of Garibaldi and Bismarck.
[Ref: 17242]    £400.00 ($522 • €449 rates)


ALEPH [HARVEY, William]. [Pictorial map of Spain & Portugal]
Spain & Portugal. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1869. 250 x 210mm.
Anthropomorphic map of Spain & Portugal. The text below the image reads: ''These long divided nations soon may be, By Prims' grace, joined in lasting amity. And ladies fair - if King Fernando rules, Grow grapes in peace, and fatten their pet mules''. It was published in 'Geographical Fun', a charming atlas of caricature maps of European counties, drawn, according to the preface, by a fifteen-year-old girl to amuse her sick brother. The author was, however, William Harvey (1796-1873), a London Doctor and Journalist, best-known for his book 'London Scenes and London People', 1863. The maps contain many references to the political changes sweeping through continental Europe, with representations of Garibaldi and Bismarck.
[Ref: 17243]    £450.00 ($587 • €505 rates)


ALEPH [HARVEY, William]. [Pictorial map of Prussia]
Prussia. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1869. 250 x 210mm.
Anthropomorphic map of Prussia. The text below the image reads: ''His Majesty of Prussia - grim and old - Sadowa's King - by needle guns made bold; With Bismarck of the royal conscience, keeper, In dreams political none wiser - deeper''. It was published in 'Geographical Fun', a charming atlas of caricature maps of European counties, drawn, according to the preface, by a fifteen-year-old girl to amuse her sick brother. The author was, however, William Harvey (1796-1873), a London Doctor and Journalist, best-known for his book 'London Scenes and London People', 1863. The maps contain many references to the political changes sweeping through continental Europe, with representations of Garibaldi and Tzar Alexander II.
[Ref: 17244]    £450.00 ($587 • €505 rates)


ALEPH [HARVEY, William]. [Pictorial map of Russia]
Russia London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1869. 250 x 210mm.
Anthropomorphic map of Russia, depicted as a bear and a Tzar Alexander II. The text below the image reads, ''Peter, and Catherine and Alexander, Mad Paul, and Nicholas, poor shadows wander Out in the cold: while Emperor A. the Second In Eagles, Priests and Bears supreme is reckoned''. It was published in 'Geographical Fun', a charming atlas of caricature maps of European counties, drawn, according to the preface, by a fifteen-year-old girl to amuse her sick brother. The author was, however, William Harvey (1796-1873), a London Doctor and Journalist, best-known for his book 'London Scenes and London People', 1863. The maps contain many references to the political changes sweeping through continental Europe, with representations of Garibaldi and Bismarck.
[Ref: 17273]    £650.00 ($848 • €729 rates)


HADOL, Paul. [A variant edition of Hadol's serio-comic map of Europe]
Nouvelle Carte d'Europe dressé pour 1870. Carte drôlatique d'Europe pour 1870. Paris, 1870. Wood engraving, printed in colours. 330 x 520mm. Minor reinforcement to folds on verso.
A separate-issue caricature map of Europe, satirising the political situation at the titme of the Franco-Prussian war by caricaturing the countries with stereotypes. England is a crone with Ireland a dog on a lead, angry at being ignored by the rest of Europe; France and Prussia square up, preparing for the war that started in July that year; Prussia has one hand on the Netherlands and kneels on Austria's chest; Denmark has artificial legs, having lost Holstein also to Prussia; however, as in all the variants of this caricature over 50 years, Russia is the 'croquemitaine' (bogeyman). This very close copy of Hadol's map lacks his name, has different decoration around the title and minute differences to the design.
[Ref: 18225]    £1,200.00 ($1,565 • €1,346 rates)


Anonymous. [A rare caricature map of the end of the Franco-Prussian War]
La Prusse s'Arrêtant. La Ligne Exacte De Démarcation De L'Armistice. Le contour de l'animal montre d'une maniere Absolument Exacte les lignes occupées par les belligérants pendant l'armistice... London: Edward Stanford, 14th February 1871. Tinted lithograph, sheet 405 x 525mm. A few repairs.
An extremely rare broadsheet caricature map of France at the end of the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1), with the area occupied by the Prussians depicted as a lion's head with the face of Wilhelm I. After France declared war in July 1870 the Prussians mobilised more quickly and swept into northern France and within two months had captured Napoleon III and had Paris under siege. The fall of the French capital on 28th January 1871 led to an armistice while the terms of the French surrender could be agreed. Two weeks later this pro-French propaganda map was published in London, using the symbolism of the carnivorous lion because 'of the uncontrollable voracity of Prussia exemplified by the veracity of their present demands', which included the annexation of both Alsace and Lorraine. The success of these demands led to the rise of 'revanchism' in France and British concern about the balance of power in Europe, both major factors in the outbreak of the First World War
[Ref: 17986]    £825.00 ($1,076 • €926 rates)


GALL & INGLIS. [A jigsaw map of England and Wales]
England & Wales. Edinburgh & London, c.1880. Original colour. 430 x 330mm, laid on plywood and dissected, as issued, with original box with illustrated lid. Box lid with repaired break and old ink mss. inscription, Shopshire piece split in two. Complete.
An educational jigsaw antique map of England and Wales with a piece depicting each county.
[Ref: 12144]    £350.00 ($456 • €393 rates)


GROSSI, Augusto. [An 1884 satire featuring the famous Russian Octopus]
Ricreazioni Politiche. Récréations Politiques. Bologna: Il Papagallo, 1884. Chromolithograph. Sheet 425 x 610mm. A few signs of age, pasted on card.
An Italian satire commenting on relations between Germany and Russia during the 1880s. Personifications of Germany (drinking), Austria (baiting a hook), Italy (standing waiting) and Spain (smoking a Prussian cigar) lounge on a motor yacht called 'Alleanza' piloted to Otto van Bismarck, pointedly ignoring the Russian octopus floating by their stern, clutching a mine lettered 'Guerra'. On the left a fish marked Saloccico (Thessaloniki, still in the Ottoman Vilayet of Salonica) looks on in fright; on the right is a buoy with an English sailor's head, marked 'galleggiante' (floating). In the background a mermaid (France?) pulls herself up on a Chinese junk. After the victory of the Franco-Prussian war of 1870 Bismarck was fearful that France would get its revenge by allying with Russian and attacking Germany from two sides. Therefore he did everything he could to stay on good terms with Russia, ignoring their continued southward push. Meanwhile France was extending its influence in the Far East. On the reverse of the card is another Papagallo satire, relating to the European powers preparing to feast on the Madagascan 'turkey'. 'Il Papagallo' was a satirical magazine founded in January 1873 by Augusto Grossi (1835-1919), which specialised in colour-printed caricatures like this one. At its peak circulatiion reached 50,000, and in 1878 a Parisian version, 'Le Perroquet', and London edition, 'The Parrot', were launched. 'Il Papagallo' closed in 1915, when Grossi was 70 years old. This example, with titles and text in both Italian and French was published in Bologna for editions in both countries.
[Ref: 16585]    £2,500.00 ($3,260 • €2,805 rates)


DAILY MAIL PUBLISHING. [Handkerchief published to raise money for the families of Boer War Soldiers]
The Absent-Minded Beggar. London, the Daily Mail Publishing Co. Ltd, c.1899. Linen handkerchief printed in blue, c. 440 x 440mm.
A printed handkerchief published by the Daily Mail to rise funds for the 'Soldiers' Families Fund' after the outbreak of the Second Boer War (1899-1902), the first charitable effort for a war. The map shows the theatre of war, around the South African Republic (the Transvaal) and the Orange Free State. The two portraits are of Lord Roberts, commander of the British Troops, and Queen Victoria, the British Monarch for the first half of the war. The poem, 'The Absent-Minded Beggar' by Rudyard Kipling, was specially commissioned for the Fund, and was given a musical score by Arthur Sullivan (of Gilbert & Sullivan fame). Despite Roberts' portait being entwined in the title, the absent-minded beggar of Kipling’s poem is the British 'Tommy' (private soldier), forgetfully leaving their dependents in need while fighting for their country. The Daily Mail paid Kipling £250 for the poem, which he donated to the fund, as did Sullivan with his £100 payment. Soon afterwards Kipling was offered a knighthood, which he declined. It was not Kipling's favourite work: in his autobiography he wrote that it 'lacked poetry' and became 'wedded... to a tune guaranteed to pull teeth out of barrel-organs'. This did not stop it being a huge success, giving the fund the nickname, 'the Absent-Minded Beggar Relief Corps', and helping it raise £340,000 by the time it was wound up in 1903. Not only was it published worldwide (the New York Journal paid $25 for the privilege), it was recited by actresses including Lily Langtree and Lady Maud Beerbohm Tree. Organising the fund was a coup for the Daily Mail, which had been founded only in 1896. This campaign capitalised on the jingoistic mood of the British public and the paper's circulation soared to over a million issues a day by 1902, the highest in the world. The handkerchief was published by The Graphic and is probably the most famous item of British ephemera produced during the South African War.
[Ref: 16054]    £350.00 ($456 • €393 rates)


OHARA, Kisaburo. [A Japanese variant of the Serio-Comic map]
[Japanese title.] A Humorous Diplomatic Atlas of Europe and Asia. Tokyo: Yoshijiro Yabuzaki, 1904. Chromolithograph, sheet 495 x 560mm.
A variant of the Frederick W. Rose 'octopus' map of Europe, extended to include more Asian states, including India, Tibet, China, Korea and Japan, with a title in Japanese and English, an English description top left and a longer Japanese text under the map. It was drawn by a student at Keio University on the outbreak of the Russo-Japanese War in 1904 so, of course, the focal point of the map is the 'Black Octopus' of Russia. One of its tentacles reaches down to Port Arthur in Manchuria, which was Japan's first target of the hostilities. Ohara gloatingly writes 'The Japanese fleet has already practically annihilated Russia's naval powers in the Orient. The Japanese army is about to win a signal victory over Russia in Corea and Manchuria'. SOUCACOS: p.178.
[Ref: 17455]    £5,000.00 ($6,520 • €5,610 rates)


Records: 31 to 40 of 48
« previous 1 2 3 4 5 next »