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Records: 31 to 40 of 52
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  DECORATIVE 
 Decorative Items 

ALEPH [HARVEY, William]. [Pictorial map of Germany]
Germany. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1869. 250 x 210mm.
Anthropomorphic map of Germany as a woman. The text below the image reads, ''Lo! Studious Germany, in her delight, At coming glories, shewn by second sight, And on her visioned future proudly glancing, Her joy expresses by a lady dancing''. It was published in 'Geographical Fun', a charming atlas of caricature maps of European counties, drawn, according to the preface, by a fifteen-year-old girl to amuse her sick brother. The author was, however, William Harvey (1796-1873), a London Doctor and Journalist, best-known for his book 'London Scenes and London People', 1863. The maps contain many references to the political changes sweeping through continental Europe, with representations of Garibaldi and Alexander II of Russia.
[Ref: 17241]    £450.00 ($578 • €504 rates)


ALEPH [HARVEY, William]. [Pictorial map of Denmark]
Denmark. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1869. 250 x 210mm.
Anthropomorphic map of Denmark. The text below the image reads, ''For Shakespeare's Prince, and the Princess of Wales, To England dear. Her royal spirit quails; From skating faint, she rests upon the snow; Shrinking from unclean beasts hat grin below''. It was published in 'Geographical Fun', a charming atlas of caricature maps of European counties, drawn, according to the preface, by a fifteen-year-old girl to amuse her sick brother. The author was, however, William Harvey (1796-1873), a London Doctor and Journalist, best-known for his book 'London Scenes and London People', 1863. The maps contain many references to the political changes sweeping through continental Europe, with representations of Garibaldi and Bismarck.
[Ref: 17242]    £400.00 ($514 • €448 rates)


ALEPH [HARVEY, William]. [Pictorial map of Spain & Portugal]
Spain & Portugal. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1869. 250 x 210mm.
Anthropomorphic map of Spain & Portugal. The text below the image reads: ''These long divided nations soon may be, By Prims' grace, joined in lasting amity. And ladies fair - if King Fernando rules, Grow grapes in peace, and fatten their pet mules''. It was published in 'Geographical Fun', a charming atlas of caricature maps of European counties, drawn, according to the preface, by a fifteen-year-old girl to amuse her sick brother. The author was, however, William Harvey (1796-1873), a London Doctor and Journalist, best-known for his book 'London Scenes and London People', 1863. The maps contain many references to the political changes sweeping through continental Europe, with representations of Garibaldi and Bismarck.
[Ref: 17243]    £450.00 ($578 • €504 rates)


ALEPH [HARVEY, William]. [Pictorial map of Prussia]
Prussia. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1869. 250 x 210mm.
Anthropomorphic map of Prussia. The text below the image reads: ''His Majesty of Prussia - grim and old - Sadowa's King - by needle guns made bold; With Bismarck of the royal conscience, keeper, In dreams political none wiser - deeper''. It was published in 'Geographical Fun', a charming atlas of caricature maps of European counties, drawn, according to the preface, by a fifteen-year-old girl to amuse her sick brother. The author was, however, William Harvey (1796-1873), a London Doctor and Journalist, best-known for his book 'London Scenes and London People', 1863. The maps contain many references to the political changes sweeping through continental Europe, with representations of Garibaldi and Tzar Alexander II.
[Ref: 17244]    £450.00 ($578 • €504 rates)


ALEPH [HARVEY, William]. [Pictorial map of Russia]
Russia London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1869. 250 x 210mm.
Anthropomorphic map of Russia, depicted as a bear and a Tzar Alexander II. The text below the image reads, ''Peter, and Catherine and Alexander, Mad Paul, and Nicholas, poor shadows wander Out in the cold: while Emperor A. the Second In Eagles, Priests and Bears supreme is reckoned''. It was published in 'Geographical Fun', a charming atlas of caricature maps of European counties, drawn, according to the preface, by a fifteen-year-old girl to amuse her sick brother. The author was, however, William Harvey (1796-1873), a London Doctor and Journalist, best-known for his book 'London Scenes and London People', 1863. The maps contain many references to the political changes sweeping through continental Europe, with representations of Garibaldi and Bismarck.
[Ref: 17273]    £650.00 ($835 • €727 rates)


HADOL, Paul. [A variant edition of Hadol's serio-comic map of Europe]
Nouvelle Carte d'Europe dressé pour 1870. Carte drôlatique d'Europe pour 1870. Paris, 1870. Wood engraving, printed in colours. 330 x 520mm. Minor reinforcement to folds on verso.
A separate-issue caricature map of Europe, satirising the political situation at the time of the Franco-Prussian war by caricaturing the countries with stereotypes. England is a crone with Ireland a dog on a lead, angry at being ignored by the rest of Europe; France and Prussia square up, preparing for the war that started in July that year; Prussia has one hand on the Netherlands and kneels on Austria's chest; Denmark has artificial legs, having lost Holstein also to Prussia; however, as in all the variants of this caricature over 50 years, Russia is the 'croquemitaine' (bogeyman). This very close copy of Hadol's map lacks his name, has different decoration around the title and minute differences to the design.
[Ref: 18225]    £1,200.00 ($1,541 • €1,343 rates)


HADOL, Paul. [A rare Swedish edition of Hadol's serio-comic map of Europe]
Tragi-Komisk Karta Ofver Europa efter en Engelsk Teckning Sweden, c.1870. Wood engraving, printed in colours. Sheet 335 x 480mm.
A Swedish version of Hadol's separate-issue caricature map of Europe, satirising the political situation at the time of the Franco-Prussian war by caricaturing the countries with stereotypes. England is a crone with Ireland a dog on a lead, angry at being ignored by the rest of Europe; France and Prussia square up, preparing for the war that started in July that year; Prussia has one hand on the Netherlands and kneels on Austria's chest; Denmark has artificial legs, having lost Holstein also to Prussia; and Russia looks on, hoping to pick up the pieces left by Europe's struggles. The title states the map was copied from an English drawing; an identical map was published by Dubliner Joseph John Goggins, but it is unclear whether his or Hadol's version came first. See BAYNTON-WILLIAMS: Curious Map Book, p.174 for the rare Goggins version.
[Ref: 18972]    £1,400.00 ($1,798 • €1,567 rates)


GALL & INGLIS. [A jigsaw map of England and Wales]
England & Wales. Edinburgh & London, c.1880. Original colour. 430 x 330mm, laid on plywood and dissected, as issued, with original box with illustrated lid. Box lid with repaired break and old ink mss. inscription, Shopshire piece split in two. Complete.
An educational jigsaw antique map of England and Wales with a piece depicting each county.
[Ref: 12144]    £350.00 ($449 • €392 rates)


GROSSI, Augusto. [An 1884 satire featuring the famous Russian Octopus]
Ricreazioni Politiche. Récréations Politiques. Bologna: Il Papagallo, 1884. Chromolithograph. Sheet 425 x 610mm. A few signs of age, pasted on card.
An Italian satire commenting on relations between Germany and Russia during the 1880s. Personifications of Germany (drinking), Austria (baiting a hook), Italy (standing waiting) and Spain (smoking a Prussian cigar) lounge on a motor yacht called 'Alleanza' piloted to Otto van Bismarck, pointedly ignoring the Russian octopus floating by their stern, clutching a mine lettered 'Guerra'. On the left a fish marked Saloccico (Thessaloniki, still in the Ottoman Vilayet of Salonica) looks on in fright; on the right is a buoy with an English sailor's head, marked 'galleggiante' (floating). In the background a mermaid (France?) pulls herself up on a Chinese junk. After the victory of the Franco-Prussian war of 1870 Bismarck was fearful that France would get its revenge by allying with Russian and attacking Germany from two sides. Therefore he did everything he could to stay on good terms with Russia, ignoring their continued southward push. Meanwhile France was extending its influence in the Far East. On the reverse of the card is another Papagallo satire, relating to the European powers preparing to feast on the Madagascan 'turkey'. 'Il Papagallo' was a satirical magazine founded in January 1873 by Augusto Grossi (1835-1919), which specialised in colour-printed caricatures like this one. At its peak circulatiion reached 50,000, and in 1878 a Parisian version, 'Le Perroquet', and London edition, 'The Parrot', were launched. 'Il Papagallo' closed in 1915, when Grossi was 70 years old. This example, with titles and text in both Italian and French was published in Bologna for editions in both countries.
[Ref: 16585]    £2,500.00 ($3,210 • €2,798 rates)


HADOL, Paul. [An Italian edition of Hadol's serio-comic map of Europe]
Carta Figurata d'Europa 1888. La Pacifica Baracca. Bologna: Casanova e Farinelli, 1888. Tinted lithograph. Sheet 305 x 410mm. Small tear in edge of margin.
An Italian version of Hadol's separate-issue caricature map of Europe, first published in 1870 at the time of the Franco-Prussian war. The countries are caricatured with stereotypes: England is a crone with Ireland a dog on a lead, angry at being ignored by the rest of Europe; France and Prussia square up, preparing for the war that started in July that year; Prussia has one hand on the Netherlands and kneels on Austria's chest; Denmark has artificial legs, having lost Holstein also to Prussia; and Russia looks on, hoping to pick up the pieces left by Europe's struggles. The map appeared in 'La Rana' (The Frog), a satirical magazine edited by Leonida Gioannetti and Augusto Grossi that ceased publication in 1912.
[Ref: 18974]    £1,650.00 ($2,119 • €1,846 rates)


Records: 31 to 40 of 52
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