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Records: 31 to 40 of 81
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  CELESTIAL 
 Celestial Maps 

CELLARIUS, Andreas. [The Motions of the Three Outer Planets]
Theoria trium superiorum planetarum. Amsterdam, Schenk & Valk, 1708. Original colour with additions, including gold highlights. 440 x 515mm.
'Representation (of the motions) of the three superior planets (Mars, Jupiter & Saturn).' This chart was published in the 'Atlas Coelestis; seu Harmonia Macrocosmica', the only celestial atlas to be produced in the Netherlands before the nineteenth century. It was a compilation of maps of the Ptolemaic universe and the more modern theories of Copernicus and Brahe, and remains the finest and most highly decorative celestial atlas ever produced. It was originally published by Jan Jansson in 1660: this chart comes from Schenk & Valk's reissue. KOEMAN: Cel 3.
[Ref: 13542]    £1,200.00 ($1,548 • €1,416 rates)


CELLARIUS, Andreas. [The planisphere of Aratus]
Planisphaerium Arateum sive compages orbium mundanorum ex hpyothesi Arate in plano expressa. Amsterdam, Schenk & Valk, 1708. Original colour with additions, including gold highlights. 440 x 515mm.
'The planisphere of Aratus, or the composition of the heavenly orbits following the hypothesis of Aratus expressed in a planar view.' Aratus (c.315-240 BC), a Greek diadactic poet, wrote 'Phaenomena', a poem about the Constellations and planetary motions. The borders of this chart contain the titles, on banners held aloft by putti, and two scanes of astronomers debating their findings. It was engraved by van Loon and published in the 'Atlas Coelestis; seu Harmonia Macrocosmica', the only celestial atlas to be produced in the Netherlands before the nineteenth century. It was a compilation of maps of the Ptolemaic universe and the more modern theories of Copernicus and Brahe, and remains the finest and most highly decorative celestial atlas ever produced. It was originally published by Jan Jansson in 1660: this chart comes from Schenk & Valk's reissue. KOEMAN: Cel 3.
[Ref: 13547]    £2,200.00 ($2,838 • €2,596 rates)


CELLARIUS, Andreas. [Celestial chart showing the Ptolemaic planetary orbits]
Hypothesis Ptolemaica sive communis, planetarum motus per eccentricos, et epicyclos demostrans. Amsterdam, Schenk & Valk, 1708. Original colour with additions, including gold highlights. 440 x 515mm.
'The Ptolemaic or commonly accepted hypothesis, demonstrating the planetary motions in eccentric and epicyclical orbits.' This chart was published in the 'Atlas Coelestis; seu Harmonia Macrocosmica', the only celestial atlas to be produced in the Netherlands before the nineteenth century. It was a compilation of maps of the Ptolemaic universe and the more modern theories of Copernicus and Brahe, and remains the finest and most highly decorative celestial atlas ever produced. It was originally published by Jan Jansson in 1660: this chart comes from Schenk & Valk's reissue. KOEMAN: Cel 3.
[Ref: 13549]    £950.00 ($1,226 • €1,121 rates)


CELLARIUS, Andreas. [Celestial chart illustrating the apparent motions of Venus & Mercury]
Theoria Veneris et Mercurii. Amsterdam, Schenk & Valk, 1708. Original colour with additions, including gold highlights. 440 x 515mm.
A beautiful chart showing the paths of Venus and Mercury as seen from Earth, published in the 'Atlas Coelestis; seu Harmonia Macrocosmica', the only celestial atlas to be produced in the Netherlands before the nineteenth century. It was a compilation of maps of the Ptolemaic universe and the more modern theories of Copernicus and Brahe, and remains the finest and most highly decorative celestial atlas ever produced. It was originally published by Jan Jansson in 1660: this chart comes from Schenk & Valk's reissue. KOEMAN: Cel 3.
[Ref: 13530]    £950.00 ($1,226 • €1,121 rates)


THOMAS, Corbinianus. [18th century map of the Zodiac sign Sagittarius]
Sagittarius. Frankfurt, 1730. Original colour. 135 x 140mm.
The constellation Sagittarius, engraved by Johann Christoph Berndt for the celestial atlas 'Mercurii Philosphici Firmamentum Firmianum', named for Thomas's patron, Leopold Anton von Firmian, Archbishop of Salzburg. Corbinianus Thomas (1694-1767), a Benedictine monk, was Professor of Mathematics and Theology at the University of Salzburg. His star atlas was first published in 1730 at Frankfurt, with a second edition at Augsburg the following year. He used an odd system for nomenclature: Bayer Greek letter for the star, Roman numeral for the magnitude and Arabic numeral for the star catalogue reference. Individual zodiac signs of this period are uncommon, especially in original colour. KANAS: 7.7, 'beautiful illustrations'; WARNER, p.251.
[Ref: 14298]    £500.00 ($645 • €590 rates)


THOMAS, Corbinianus. [18th century illustration of a celestial globe]
Astrodicticum Globo applicam. Frankfurt, 1730. Original colour. 135 x 125mm.
A celestial globe in fine hand colour, engraved by Johann Christoph Berndt for the celestial atlas 'Mercurii Philosphici Firmamentum Firmianum', named for Thomas's patron, Leopold Anton von Firmian, Archbishop of Salzburg. Corbinianus Thomas (1694-1767), a Benedictine monk, was Professor of Mathematics and Theology at the University of Salzburg. His star atlas was first published in 1730 at Frankfurt, with a second edition at Augsburg the following year. He used an odd system for nomenclature: Bayer Greek letter for the star, Roman numeral for the magnitude and Arabic numeral for the star catalogue reference. KANAS: 7.7, 'beautiful illustrations'; WARNER, p.251.
[Ref: 14308]    £240.00 ($310 • €283 rates)


THOMAS, Corbinianus. [18th century illustration of the constellation Centarus]
Centarus. Lupus. Frankfurt, 1730. Original colour. 140 x 205mm. Original binding fold flattened.
The constellations Centarus & Lupus in fine hand colour, engraved by Johann Christoph Berndt for the celestial atlas 'Mercurii Philosphici Firmamentum Firmianum', named for Thomas's patron, Leopold Anton von Firmian, Archbishop of Salzburg. Alpha Centauri is the closest star to ours. Corbinianus Thomas (1694-1767), a Benedictine monk, was Professor of Mathematics and Theology at the University of Salzburg. His star atlas was first published in 1730 at Frankfurt, with a second edition at Augsburg the following year. He used an odd system for nomenclature: Bayer Greek letter for the star, Roman numeral for the magnitude and Arabic numeral for the star catalogue reference. KANAS: 7.7, 'beautiful illustrations'; WARNER, p.251.
[Ref: 14311]    £400.00 ($516 • €472 rates)


THOMAS, Corbinianus. [18th century illustration of the constellation Draco]
Draco. Frankfurt, 1730. Original colour. 140 x 205mm. Original binding fold flattened.
The constellation Draco in fine hand colour. The plate was engraved by Johann Christoph Berndt for the celestial atlas 'Mercurii Philosphici Firmamentum Firmianum', named for Thomas's patron, Leopold Anton von Firmian, Archbishop of Salzburg. Corbinianus Thomas (1694-1767), a Benedictine monk, was Professor of Mathematics and Theology at the University of Salzburg. His star atlas was first published in 1730 at Frankfurt, with a second edition at Augsburg the following year. He used an odd system for nomenclature: Bayer Greek letter for the star, Roman numeral for the magnitude and Arabic numeral for the star catalogue reference. KANAS: 7.7, 'beautiful illustrations'; WARNER, p.251.
[Ref: 14313]    £400.00 ($516 • €472 rates)


THOMAS, Corbinianus. [18th century illustration of the constellation Ursa Minor]
Ursa Minor. Frankfurt, 1730. Original colour. 120 x 135mm.
Ursa Minor (the Little Bear), the constellation containing Polaris, the northern Pole Star. It was engraved by Johann Christoph Berndt for the celestial atlas 'Mercurii Philosphici Firmamentum Firmianum', named for Thomas's patron, Leopold Anton von Firmian, Archbishop of Salzburg. Corbinianus Thomas (1694-1767), a Benedictine monk, was Professor of Mathematics and Theology at the University of Salzburg. His star atlas was first published in 1730 at Frankfurt, with a second edition at Augsburg the following year. He used an odd system for nomenclature: Bayer Greek letter for the star, Roman numeral for the magnitude and Arabic numeral for the star catalogue reference. KANAS: 7.7, 'beautiful illustrations'; WARNER, p.251.
[Ref: 14323]    £350.00 ($452 • €413 rates)


THOMAS, Corbinianus. [18th century illustration of the constellation Perseus]
Perseus. Caput Medusæ. Frankfurt, 1730. Original colour. 140 x 140mm.
A chart of the constellation of Perseus, personified by the Greek hero, holding the Head of Medusa constellation by the hair. It was engraved by Johann Christoph Berndt for the celestial atlas 'Mercurii Philosphici Firmamentum Firmianum', named for Thomas's patron, Leopold Anton von Firmian, Archbishop of Salzburg. Corbinianus Thomas (1694-1767), a Benedictine monk, was Professor of Mathematics and Theology at the University of Salzburg. His star atlas was first published in 1730 at Frankfurt, with a second edition at Augsburg the following year. He used an odd system for nomenclature: Bayer Greek letter for the star, Roman numeral for the magnitude and Arabic numeral for the star catalogue reference. KANAS: 7.7, 'beautiful illustrations'; WARNER, p.251.
[Ref: 14324]    £350.00 ($452 • €413 rates)


Records: 31 to 40 of 81
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