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Records: 41 to 50 of 449
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  AMERICA 
 North America 

MÜLLER, Gerhard Friedrich. [18th century Russian discoveries in the North Pacific]
Nouvelle Carte des Decouvertes faites par des Vaisseaux Russiens aux cotes inconnues de l'Amerique Septentrionale Avec les Pais Adiacentes. St Petersburg: Academy of Sciences, 1773. Folding map, dissected and laid on linen, 505 x 690mm.
A map charting the Russian explorations in the North Pacific published just a few years before the Captain Cook's Third Voyage took him to the Bering Strait. The Asian coastline has taken some shape, with Kamchatka recognisable, but neither Hokkaido or Sakhalin delineated. The American West Coast has few details, with no recognisable Alaska, but Mount St Elias is shown, as are the landing points of the Russian explorers Bering and Chirikov, Drake's New Albion, and a North West Passage from Hudson's Bay.
[Ref: 12496]    £785.00 ($1,052 • €894 rates)


Anonymous. [Cook's voyage through the North Pacific]
Carte de la Partie Septentrionale de la Mer du Sud... Paris, c.1785. Coloured. 260 x 370mm. Repaired tear.
The north Pacific, with the route of Cook's Last Voyage marked. In 1778 he passed throught the Bering Strait but got blocked by the icepack. He turned south and met his death on Hawaii.
[Ref: 13562]    £150.00 ($201 • €171 rates)


LOTTER, Tobias Conrad. [The first folio map to show Cook's discoveries in the North Pacific, including Hawaii]
Carte de l'Ocean Pacifique au Nord de l'Equateur, et des Cotes qui le bornent des deux côtés: d'apres les derniers Découvertes faites par les Espagnols, les Russes et les Anglois, jusqu'en 1780. Augsburg, 1781. Original body colour. 490 x 565mm.
An important map of the Pacific north of the equator, showing the route of Captain Cook on his Third Voyage, 1776-80, which was sent to try to find the North-West Passage from the west side of America. After visiting Tasmania and returning Omai to Tahiti, Cook sailed north to Hawaii, arriving on the 18th January 1778 as the first European visitor to the archipelago. Heading north again, the expedition explored the west coast of America before passing through the Bering Strait, only to be blocked by the ice wall. Cook then turned back to return to Hawaii, where he was stabbed to death in a violent confrontation. Captain Charles Clerke took over command and decided to make another attempt on the Bering Strait, this time following the Asiatic coast north. Again defeated by the icewall the expedition turned south, and, after Clerke died of tuberculosis, followed the East India Trade Route home from China, arriving in October 1780. This map is the first folio atlas map to show the new discoveries, pre-dating the official account: according to the text under the map it is based on one published in the Gentleman's Magazine in December 1780, while the official account was still being compiled.
[Ref: 18094]    £1,000.00 ($1,340 • €1,139 rates)


 United States 

TALLIS, John. [Map of the United States with decorative vignettes]
United States. London, J. & F.Tallis, c.1850. Original outline colour. Steel engraving, printed area 255 x 340mm.
A map of the United States as far west as the Missouri Territory, New Mexico and Texas, with portraits of Washington & Franklin in the decorative borders, and vignette views of Buffalo hunting, Penn's Treaty with the Indians, & Washington's Monument in Baltimore. It was published in John Howard Hinton's 'History of the United States of America, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time'.
[Ref: 18063]    £280.00 ($375 • €319 rates)


 Eastern Seaboard 

BLAEU, Johannes. [The earliest obtainable view of New York City]
Nieuw Amsterdam op t Eylant Manhattans. Amsterdam, c.1650. Etching, printed border 75 x 310mm. Corner of left bottom margin repaired, not affecting printed area; otherwise a very fine example.
A rare and important early prospect of 'New Amsterdam', only the second view to be published and now the earliest available to the collector. It shows the Dutch colony at a time of crisis, when the Board of Nine sent a petition to the council of the Dutch West India Company complaining about conditions and mismanagement of the colony's affairs by the Director-General Peter Stuyvesant. Blaeu published this view not in one of his grand atlases but as a loose print, printed anonymously to accompany a political pamphlet, 'Vertoogh van Nieu-Neder-Land', which drew public attention to the plight of the New Amsterdam colonists under Stuyvesant. The colonists had sent Adriaen van der Donck to Amsterdam in 1649 to petition the Council with a written 'Remonstrance of the Commonality of New Netherland', asking for Stuyvesant to be recalled. It included this view of New Amsterdam to show the conditions in the small settlement, with only ten points worthy of inclusion in the key. These include the fort, windmill, flagpole (to guide ships to port), church, Company's Warehouse and, to emphasise the brutality of life there, the prison and gibbet complete with hanging body. The unlisted wooden 'crane' in the centre is a fire-basket signal pole for signalling at night. The 'Remonstrance' also included a map of the region showing how the colony was in danger of being overwhelmed by the English and calling for more aid. Van der Donck's map was copied and published by Jan Jansson (as 'Nova Belgii...', 1650); it and Blaeu's view were both originally issued anonymously because of the political implications of supporting a near-revolt in the colonies. Despite the support of the two publishers the 'Remonstrance' was ignored: Stuyvesant remained Director General until 1664, with a regime noted for its religious intolerance. In August that year the colony was taken by the English with only 450 men. A feature of Blaeu's etching is that it lacks a plate mark, having been one of several views printed from one printing plate and cut into separate sheets for issue. It soon became the standard view of New Amsterdam: shortly afterwards Nicolaes Visscher published a corrected version of Jansson's map and added the prospect in the bottom right corner and as he was the first publisher to admit to his work the 'New Amsterdam' became known as the Visscher view. In 1991 a pen, ink and watercolour sketch was uncovered in the Albertina Collection of the Austrian National Gallery, which is believed to be the prototype. DE KONING: From Van der Donck to Visscher (Mercator's World Vol 5, no 4, 2000).
[Ref: 15516]    £10,000.00 ($13,400 • €11,390 rates)


HOLME, Thomas. [The first printed map of Pennsylvania]
A Mapp of Ye Improved Part of Pensilvania in America, Divided into Countyes, Townships and Lotts. To William Penn Esq. Proprietor & Governer of Pennsylvania This Mapp is Humbly Dedicated and Presented by Jn.o Harris. London: George Willdey, c.1715. 405 x 550mm.
An important map, being the first survey of William Penn's colony of Philadelphia, and containing the first plan of Philadelphia, the earliest map of any English city in America. Thomas Holme (1624-95) learned surveying in Cromwell's army, but became a Quaker after the end of the Civil War, which brought him into William Penn's circle. When Penn's original surveyor for the colony died en route to America, Holme was invited by Penn to take his place as Surveyor-General in 1682. He compiled a map of the new colony and carefully recorded the names of those who had bought property, and drew a plan of how the streets of Philadelphia were to be laid out. This street map is one of the first examples of urban planning. In May 1687 Penn requested a copy of Holme's map be send to London for publication, to encourage further migration. The map was issued in two formats: as a six-sheet wall map engraved by Francis Lamb, of which only four example still exist (Burden 628); and this single-sheet version, engraved by John Harris and originally published by Philip Lea c.1688. Like the six-sheet version it featured the plan of Philadelphia prominently. BURDEN: 669, state ii of iv.
[Ref: 16279]    £37,500.00 ($50,250 • €42,713 rates)


HOMANN, Johann Baptist. [An influencial map of the British colonies in Virginia, Maryland & Carolina]
Virginia Marylandia et Carolina in America Septentrionali Britannirum industria excultae. Nuremberg, c.1720. Original colour. 495 x 585mm.
The Eastern Seaboard from Long Island south to Cape Fear. This map appeared at a time of high emigration from Germany to the Americas: it has been suggested that the large title cartouche, showing an Indian trading with a European surrounded by the wealth of the Americas, was an attempt to persuade more of George I's German subjects to seek their fortunes in the New World.
[Ref: 17894]    £1,650.00 ($2,211 • €1,879 rates)


BROWNE, Christopher. [Senex edition of Browne's map of Maryland]
A New Map of Virginia, Maryland and the Improved Parts of Pennsylvania & New Jersey... London, John Senex, 1721, original outline colour, 490 x 550mm. Trimmed to printed border at bottom and just into printed border top left and right, expertly remargined with some manuscript fill. One small tear repaired.
The third state of Christopher Browne's important map of the Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay, Virginia, Maryland and part of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, first issued in 1685. Browne's map is the last major derivative of the Augustine Hermann Map of 1673, reoriented with north at the top and reduced to a single folio sheet. Philadelphia appears on the map. The Northern and Eastern boundaries of Maryland are shown. The boundary for Delaware (then part of Pennsylvania is shown), favouring the claims of Lord Baltimore, rather than the Cape Henelopen boundary, which was finally ratified by the British Courts when the dispute was settled in the 1730s and finally mapped by Mason & Dixon several decades later. New Jersey is divided into East and West Jersey. The shoals and soundings are drawn directly from the Hermann map. The cartouche depicts tobacco and shellfish, two of the significant products of the region during colonial times. From "A New General Atlas".
[Ref: 11037]    £2,300.00 ($3,082 • €2,620 rates)


HOMANN, Johann Baptist. [The English colonies on the north-east seaboard of America]
Nova Anglia Septentrionali Americæ implantata Anglorumque coloniis florentissima. Nuremberg, c.1725. Original body colour. 495 x 600mm.
Decorative map of New England, with Lake Champlain much too large. This map appeared at a time of high emigration from Germany to the Americas: it has been suggested that the large title cartouche, showing an Indian trading with a European surrounded by the wealth of the Americas, was an attempt to persuade more to seek their fortunes in the New World.
[Ref: 11207]    £1,450.00 ($1,943 • €1,652 rates)


ELLICOTT, Andrew. [The famous Ellicott's plan for Washington DC]
Plan of the City of Washington in the Territory of Columbia, ceded by the States of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the Seat of their Government after the Year 1800. London, 1795. 420 x 540mm. Binding folds flattened.
An early copy of Andrew Ellicott's map of the planned Federal capital, engraved by John Russell after the map by John Reid published in Winterbotham's 'An Historical Geographical, Commercial and Philosophical View of the United States' in 1795. It shows the layout of the streets in both Washington and Georgetown, with 'The President's House', National Mall and Capitol.
[Ref: 17920]    £3,200.00 ($4,288 • €3,645 rates)


Records: 41 to 50 of 449
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