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Records: 41 to 50 of 387
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  WORLD 
 Polar Maps 

HONDIUS, Jodocus. [Mercator's North Pole from the 'Atlas Minor']
Polus Arcticus cum vicinis regionibus. Amsterdam, 1610, Latin text edition. Coloured. 135 x 185mm.
A reduction of Mercator's famous map of the Arctic, first published in the 'Atlas Minor' of 1607. The three roundel inset maps show the Faroe Islands, the Shetlands and the mythical island of Frisland. In 1621 the printing plate was sold to a London publisher, who republished it in 'Purchas His Pilgrimies'. Later Dutch editions used new plates by Jansson.
[Ref: 18284]    £525.00 ($707 • €600 rates)


BLAEU, Johannes. [A map of the early exploration of the Arctic Circle]
Regiones sub Polo Arctico. Amsterdam, c.1645, French text edition. Fine original colour. 410 x 630mm.
The Arctic Circle, showing European attempts to find the North West and North East Passages. In Arctic America the preponderance of English names shows the importance of the English explorers in the region, trying to circumvent the Spanish control of routes to the East Indies. On Greenland the entrance to 'M. Forbischers Straet' is marked and in Arctic Russia the names are those given by the Dutch explorers such as Berentz. At the top of the map is a title cartouche depicting wind-heads, a European explorer with a brazier on his lap and a white cannibal, and a scale cartouche with hunters and a polar bear. The European is Henry Hudson, whose explorations in Hudson's Bay (which he called 'a labyrinth without end') ended in 1611 when he was forced into a small boat and cast adrift by a mutinous crew. He was never seen again and it is assumed that his crew would have turned to eating each other to survive. This is an example of the second state of the map, with the dedication added c.1645. It is a direct copy of Jansson's map, but it is interesting that the engraver copied the Baltic Sea's name but not the coastline! BURDEN: 252.
[Ref: 18265]    £1,100.00 ($1,481 • €1,257 rates)


PITT, Moses. [The only original map in Pitt's 'English Atlas']
A Map of the North-Pole and the Parts Adjoining. Oxford: Moses Pitt, 1680. Coloured. 460 x 590mm. A few small repairs, pinholes in crest.
A scarce map of the Arctic Circle, with the title on a curtain, with portraits of Lapplanders and a whaling scene. On the map the mythical island of Frisland is marked, as is a strait through Greenland, placed there instead of Canada by Martin Frobisher, who had been confused by the non-existence of Frisland. Further west the discoveries of the English explorers looking for the North West Passage are shown. Bottom left are the arms of Charles FitzCharles (1657-80), the son of Charles II, which consists of his father's arms with a baton sinister vair overall, signifying illegitimacy. He died of dysentery defending Tangier, which had been part of his father's dowry when marrying the Portuguese princess Catherine of Braganza in 1662.
[Ref: 17805]    £4,500.00 ($6,057 • €5,144 rates)


HEYDT. Johann Wolfgang. [Unusual map of the northern Atlantic Ocean]
[North Atlantic] Nuremberg, 1744. 240 x 275mm.
Map of the North Atlantic, with Nova Scotia, Greenland, Scandinavia, Iceland and Northern Europe. Over Greenland is a vignette of hunting polar bears with dogs. From Heydt's 'Allerneuster geographisch- und topographischer Schau-Platz von Africa und Ost-Indien'. Johann Wolfgang Heydt was a German who joined the VOC (Dutch East India Company) in 1733, leaving for the east that year. He spend over two year in Sri Lanka before moving to Batavia. However he was allowed to resign for health reasons in 1740, after which he returned to Germany. He produced this book four years later, engraving his sketches himself.
[Ref: 17789]    £680.00 ($915 • €777 rates)


MARZOLLA, Benedetto. [Italian map of the North Pole]
Carta generale del Polo Artico. Naples, 1854. 440 x 580mm.
Rare map of the Arctic regions, by Neapolitan mapmaker, Benedetto Marzolla. From 'Atlante Geografico corredato di notizie relative alla Geografia Fisica e politica '. Set in extensive Italian text
[Ref: 18111]    £340.00 ($458 • €389 rates)


MOREL-Fatio, Antoine Léon. [Dumont D'Urville in the ice of Antarctica]
Les Glaces. Les Corvettes l'Astrolabe & la Zelée parties de France en 1837, pour exécuter un voyage de circumnavigation sous le commandement du Capitaine de Vaisseau Dumont D'Urville. Paris: François Delarue, c.1855. Aquatint. 530 x 670mm. Some minor spotting and faint surface abrasion.
A scene from Jules Dumont D'Urville's expedition to the Antarctic to find the South Magnetic Pole (1837-40). It shows some of the crew on the pack ice trying to free one of the corvettes. Once free the ships turned north to give his men a respite from the cold, making another attempt in 1840. Morel-Fatio (1810-71) was made 'peintre officiel de la Marine' (Painter of the Fleet) in 1853.
[Ref: 18307]    £1,200.00 ($1,615 • €1,372 rates)


  AMERICA 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The first atlas map devoted to America]
Tabula Terre Nove. Strassburg, Johannes Shott, 1513. Woodcut, printed area 385 x 445mm, paper watermarked with a fleur de lis, with good margins.
The rare first issue of Wäldseemüller's famous 'Admiral's map', the first printed atlas map specifically of the Americas. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. The twenty place names in North America suggest his sources were Portuguese, particularly the Cantino chart of 1502 and Caveri of c.1505. As the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida Peninsula appear before recorded voyages to either, this map is regarded as evidence of forgotten expeditions. It was Wäldseemüller's wall map of the world (1507) that first used the name 'America', although he was only using it for the parts of South America explored by Amerigo Vespucci. However others started using the name for the whole of the New World and here Wäldseemüller is trying to make amends: a Latin note reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. This is the best example of this landmark map we have ever seen. BURDEN: 3.
[Ref: 17346]   P.O.A.


WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The Fries version of Wäldseemüller's 'Admiral's map' of the Americas]
[Tabula Terræ Novæ .] Vienne: Michael Servetus, 1541. Woodcut, printed area 285 x 430mm.
One of the earliest obtainable maps to show the New World, this example being the fourth and last issue of the Fries reduction of Wäldseemüller's famous map, which is the first printed atlas map devoted to the Americas and said to have been compiled with the assistance of Columbus himself. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. In his version Fries added a Spanish flag over Cuba and a vignette scene in South America depicting cannibals and an opossum, both reported by Vespucci. It was Wäldseemüller's world map of 1507 that first used the name 'America', placing in southern South America, after Vespucci, who explored that region and proved it was not part of Asia. When the name began to be used for the entire landmass Wäldseemüller used this map to emphasise Columbus's importance: a Latin text above 'Terra Nova' reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. This map was originally intended not for an edition of Ptolemy but for a new 'Chronica mundi' being written by Wäldseemüller: his death c.1520 caused the project to be shelved, so the woodcuts were used to publish a smaller sized and so cheaper edition of the 'Geography'. The title, as above, is on the reverse within a plain border. BURDEN: 4.
[Ref: 17900]    £9,750.00 ($13,124 • €11,144 rates)


DE BRY, Theodore. [An important book on early American exploration]
[The Great or American Voyages.] Frankfurt: 1594-1617. Parts I-VI only (of 13) in one volume. Latin text. Folio (335 x 235 mm), 17th century vellum over pasteboard, the flat spine with small panel outlined in gilt with rolls, titled in gilt within the panel. A few neat repairs, part VI lacking 2nd section (from page 108 including 2nd frontis. and 28 plates), binding with minor repairs to spine and the board edges, endpapers replaced.
De Bry's important collection of voyages of exploration to the Americas, containing several landmark maps of the continent. Included are Hariot's account of the English colony in Virginia (second edition, second issue, 1606), with the important map of the Roanoke colony in Virginia and plates after John White; Jacques Le Moyne's Florida (second edition, 1609), with his map of south east North America and engravings of Florida and its inhabitants; Hans Stadius's Brazil (second edition, first issue, 1605) with his map of Peru and Brazil; and Girolamo Benzoni's History of the New World (first two parts second editions, 1594 & 1617, the third the first edition of 1596), with maps of the Western Hemisphere, the West Indies and New Spain, and a view of Cusco.
[Ref: 12946]    £75,000.00 ($100,950 • €85,725 rates)


FER, Nicolas de. [The Americas with California as an island]
L'Amerique, Meridionale et Septentrionale... Paris, 1700. Original colour. 225 x 340mm. A very fine and crisp example.
First issue of this map of the Americas, with decorative cartouches for the title, dedication and scale. Engraved by Inselin for the 'Atlas Curieux', California is shown as a very large island. McLAUGHLIN: 135.
[Ref: 17404]    £700.00 ($942 • €800 rates)


Records: 41 to 50 of 387
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