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Records: 41 to 50 of 99
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  CELESTIAL 
 Celestial Maps 

CELLARIUS, Andreas. [Celestial chart illustrating the apparent motions of Venus & Mercury]
Theoria Veneris et Mercurii. Amsterdam, Schenk & Valk, 1708. Original colour with additions, including gold highlights. 440 x 515mm.
A beautiful chart showing the paths of Venus and Mercury as seen from Earth, published in the 'Atlas Coelestis; seu Harmonia Macrocosmica', the only celestial atlas to be produced in the Netherlands before the nineteenth century. It was a compilation of maps of the Ptolemaic universe and the more modern theories of Copernicus and Brahe, and remains the finest and most highly decorative celestial atlas ever produced. It was originally published by Jan Jansson in 1660: this chart comes from Schenk & Valk's reissue. KOEMAN: Cel 3.
[Ref: 13530]    £950.00 ($1,235 • €1,093 rates)


CELLARIUS, Andreas. [The world's construction according to Tycho Brahe]
Scenographia compagis mundanae Brahea. Amsterdam, Schenk & Valk, 1708. Original colour with additions, including gold highlights. 440 x 515mm.
'Scenography of the world's construction according to Brahe.' A fine celestial chart showing the world's eastern hemisphere, with the motions of the sun and planets and a band representing the Zodiac. The borders are filled with putti and allegorical figures holding scientific instruments. This chart was published in the 'Atlas Coelestis; seu Harmonia Macrocosmica', the only celestial atlas to be produced in the Netherlands before the nineteenth century. It was a compilation of maps of the Ptolemaic universe and the more modern theories of Copernicus and Brahe, and remains the finest and most highly decorative celestial atlas ever produced. It was originally published by Jan Jansson in 1660: this chart comes from Schenk & Valk's reissue. KOEMAN: Cel 3.
[Ref: 13543]    £3,000.00 ($3,900 • €3,450 rates)


CELLARIUS, Andreas. [Pair of celestial charts with the constellations depicted with Christian iconography]
Coeli Stellati Christiani Haemisphaerium Posterius. [&] Coeli Stellati Christiani Haemisphaerium Prius. Amsterdam, Schenk & Valk, 1708. Original colour with additions, including gold highlights. Pair, each 440 x 515mm. Printer's crease reinforced on reverse on one plate.
A beautiful pair of celestial charts of the constellations, depicting them not in the traditional Greco-Roman figures but in Christian imagery as envisaged by Julius Schiller in 1627 in an attempt to make the iconography of the stars more relevant to his day. Thus the Zodiac is represented by the Twelve Apostles and Pegasus has become Gabriel. All the figures are shown face on, because Schiller thought it would be an indignity to have them show their backsides. His changes did not catch on, causing him often to be ridiculed, but when they were published his charts were the most accurate available. These charts was engraved by Jan van Loon and published in the 'Atlas Coelestis; seu Harmonia Macrocosmica', the only celestial atlas to be produced in the Netherlands before the nineteenth century. It was a compilation of maps of the Ptolemaic universe and the more modern theories of Copernicus and Brahe, and remains the finest and most highly decorative celestial atlas ever produced. It was originally published by Jan Jansson in 1660: this chart comes from Schenk & Valk's reissue. KOEMAN: Cel 3.
[Ref: 13536]    £7,500.00 ($9,750 • €8,625 rates)


THOMAS, Corbinianus. [18th century map of the Zodiac sign Scorpio]
Scorpius. Frankfurt, 1730. Original colour. 135 x 140mm.
The constellation Scorpio, engraved by Johann Christoph Berndt for the celestial atlas 'Mercurii Philosphici Firmamentum Firmianum', named for Thomas's patron, Leopold Anton von Firmian, Archbishop of Salzburg. Corbinianus Thomas (1694-1767), a Benedictine monk, was Professor of Mathematics and Theology at the University of Salzburg. His star atlas was first published in 1730 at Frankfurt, with a second edition at Augsburg the following year. He used an odd system for nomenclature: Bayer Greek letter for the star, Roman numeral for the magnitude and Arabic numeral for the star catalogue reference. Individual zodiac signs of this period are uncommon, especially in original colour. KANAS: 7.7, 'beautiful illustrations'; WARNER, p.251.
[Ref: 14289]    £500.00 ($650 • €575 rates)


THOMAS, Corbinianus. [18th century map of the Zodiac sign Sagittarius]
Sagittarius. Frankfurt, 1730. Original colour. 135 x 140mm.
The constellation Sagittarius, engraved by Johann Christoph Berndt for the celestial atlas 'Mercurii Philosphici Firmamentum Firmianum', named for Thomas's patron, Leopold Anton von Firmian, Archbishop of Salzburg. Corbinianus Thomas (1694-1767), a Benedictine monk, was Professor of Mathematics and Theology at the University of Salzburg. His star atlas was first published in 1730 at Frankfurt, with a second edition at Augsburg the following year. He used an odd system for nomenclature: Bayer Greek letter for the star, Roman numeral for the magnitude and Arabic numeral for the star catalogue reference. Individual zodiac signs of this period are uncommon, especially in original colour. KANAS: 7.7, 'beautiful illustrations'; WARNER, p.251.
[Ref: 14298]    £500.00 ($650 • €575 rates)


THOMAS, Corbinianus. [18th century map of the Sun]
Systema Solis ex Observationibus P. Kircheri Frankfurt, 1730. Original colour. 125 x 270mm. Original binding folds flattened.
An unusal attmpt to depict the surface of the Sun. It was engraved by Johann Christoph Berndt for the celestial atlas 'Mercurii Philosphici Firmamentum Firmianum', named for Thomas's patron, Leopold Anton von Firmian, Archbishop of Salzburg. Corbinianus Thomas (1694-1767), a Benedictine monk, was Professor of Mathematics and Theology at the University of Salzburg. His star atlas was first published in 1730 at Frankfurt, with a second edition at Augsburg the following year. He used an odd system for nomenclature: Bayer Greek letter for the star, Roman numeral for the magnitude and Arabic numeral for the star catalogue reference. KANAS: 7.7, 'beautiful illustrations'; WARNER, p.251.
[Ref: 14304]    £450.00 ($585 • €518 rates)


THOMAS, Corbinianus. [18th century illustration of a celestial globe]
Globus Coelestis. Frankfurt, 1730. Original colour. 135 x 125mm.
A celestial globe in fine hand colour, engraved by Johann Christoph Berndt for the celestial atlas 'Mercurii Philosphici Firmamentum Firmianum', named for Thomas's patron, Leopold Anton von Firmian, Archbishop of Salzburg. Corbinianus Thomas (1694-1767), a Benedictine monk, was Professor of Mathematics and Theology at the University of Salzburg. His star atlas was first published in 1730 at Frankfurt, with a second edition at Augsburg the following year. He used an odd system for nomenclature: Bayer Greek letter for the star, Roman numeral for the magnitude and Arabic numeral for the star catalogue reference. KANAS: 7.7, 'beautiful illustrations'; WARNER, p.251.
[Ref: 14307]    £240.00 ($312 • €276 rates)


THOMAS, Corbinianus. [18th century illustration of a celestial globe]
Astrodicticum Globo applicam. Frankfurt, 1730. Original colour. 135 x 125mm.
A celestial globe in fine hand colour, engraved by Johann Christoph Berndt for the celestial atlas 'Mercurii Philosphici Firmamentum Firmianum', named for Thomas's patron, Leopold Anton von Firmian, Archbishop of Salzburg. Corbinianus Thomas (1694-1767), a Benedictine monk, was Professor of Mathematics and Theology at the University of Salzburg. His star atlas was first published in 1730 at Frankfurt, with a second edition at Augsburg the following year. He used an odd system for nomenclature: Bayer Greek letter for the star, Roman numeral for the magnitude and Arabic numeral for the star catalogue reference. KANAS: 7.7, 'beautiful illustrations'; WARNER, p.251.
[Ref: 14308]    £240.00 ($312 • €276 rates)


THOMAS, Corbinianus. [18th century illustration of the constellation Andromeda]
Andromeda. Frankfurt, 1730. Original colour. 140 x 210mm. Original binding fold flattened.
The constellation Andromeda in fine hand colour, engraved by Johann Christoph Berndt for the celestial atlas 'Mercurii Philosphici Firmamentum Firmianum', named for Thomas's patron, Leopold Anton von Firmian, Archbishop of Salzburg. Corbinianus Thomas (1694-1767), a Benedictine monk, was Professor of Mathematics and Theology at the University of Salzburg. His star atlas was first published in 1730 at Frankfurt, with a second edition at Augsburg the following year. He used an odd system for nomenclature: Bayer Greek letter for the star, Roman numeral for the magnitude and Arabic numeral for the star catalogue reference. KANAS: 7.7, 'beautiful illustrations'; WARNER, p.251.
[Ref: 14310]    £450.00 ($585 • €518 rates)


THOMAS, Corbinianus. [18th century illustration of the constellation Centarus]
Centarus. Lupus. Frankfurt, 1730. Original colour. 140 x 205mm. Original binding fold flattened.
The constellations Centarus & Lupus in fine hand colour, engraved by Johann Christoph Berndt for the celestial atlas 'Mercurii Philosphici Firmamentum Firmianum', named for Thomas's patron, Leopold Anton von Firmian, Archbishop of Salzburg. Alpha Centauri is the closest star to ours. Corbinianus Thomas (1694-1767), a Benedictine monk, was Professor of Mathematics and Theology at the University of Salzburg. His star atlas was first published in 1730 at Frankfurt, with a second edition at Augsburg the following year. He used an odd system for nomenclature: Bayer Greek letter for the star, Roman numeral for the magnitude and Arabic numeral for the star catalogue reference. KANAS: 7.7, 'beautiful illustrations'; WARNER, p.251.
[Ref: 14311]    £400.00 ($520 • €460 rates)


Records: 41 to 50 of 99
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