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Records: 51 to 60 of 461
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  AMERICA 
 United States 

COLTON, J.H. [A two-sheet wall map of the United States]
Map of the United States of America, The British Provinces, Mexico, the West Indies and Central America, with part of New Granada and Venezuela. New York: J.H. Colton, 1853. Steel engraving with original hand colour. Two sheets conjoined, total 865 x 1075mm. A pristine example.
A brightly-coloured map of the United States surrounded by a decorative border of vines and grapes linking vignette scenes. Above the title is another vignette featuring a bald eagle in front of a port, with a locomotive and a paddle steamer. Two other insets show the North Atlantic and the trans-Panama railway. On the map Oregon Territory is still coloured in its pre-1853 entirety, prior to the creation of Washington Territory, although 'Washington' is written across the top half. Most of these large Colton maps were issued dissected and laid on linen, so to find an uncut example such as this is unusual.
[Ref: 17402]    £6,500.00 ($8,385 • €7,137 rates)


LLOYD, James T. [Map of the American railways at the outbreak of the Civil War]
Lloyd's American Railroad Map, Showing the Whole Seat of War. New York & London, J.T. Lloyd, c.1861. Wood-engraved folding map with original colour, dissected and laid on linen in four sections, total 990 x 1280mm, folded into marbled slipcase. Paper lightly toned, a small amount of worming, some wear.
A large map of the United States railway system east of the Mississippi, on a scale of thirty miles to an inch, with insets of the railways of Texas and Pensacola Harbour. This is an early issue, including information about the Southern railroads, removed from latter examples. Of interest is the advert for 'Fowler and Wells', the famous phrenologists in New York.
[Ref: 12385]    £1,800.00 ($2,322 • €1,976 rates)


 Eastern Seaboard 

BLAEU, Johannes. [The earliest obtainable view of New York City]
Nieuw Amsterdam op t Eylant Manhattans. Amsterdam, c.1650. Etching, printed border 75 x 310mm. Corner of left bottom margin repaired, not affecting printed area; otherwise a very fine example.
A rare and important early prospect of 'New Amsterdam', only the second view to be published and now the earliest available to the collector. It shows the Dutch colony at a time of crisis, when the Board of Nine sent a petition to the council of the Dutch West India Company complaining about conditions and mismanagement of the colony's affairs by the Director-General Peter Stuyvesant. Blaeu published this view not in one of his grand atlases but as a loose print, printed anonymously to accompany a political pamphlet, 'Vertoogh van Nieu-Neder-Land', which drew public attention to the plight of the New Amsterdam colonists under Stuyvesant. The colonists had sent Adriaen van der Donck to Amsterdam in 1649 to petition the Council with a written 'Remonstrance of the Commonality of New Netherland', asking for Stuyvesant to be recalled. It included this view of New Amsterdam to show the conditions in the small settlement, with only ten points worthy of inclusion in the key. These include the fort, windmill, flagpole (to guide ships to port), church, Company's Warehouse and, to emphasise the brutality of life there, the prison and gibbet complete with hanging body. The unlisted wooden 'crane' in the centre is a fire-basket signal pole for signalling at night. The 'Remonstrance' also included a map of the region showing how the colony was in danger of being overwhelmed by the English and calling for more aid. Van der Donck's map was copied and published by Jan Jansson (as 'Nova Belgii...', 1650); it and Blaeu's view were both originally issued anonymously because of the political implications of supporting a near-revolt in the colonies. Despite the support of the two publishers the 'Remonstrance' was ignored: Stuyvesant remained Director General until 1664, with a regime noted for its religious intolerance. In August that year the colony was taken by the English with only 450 men. A feature of Blaeu's etching is that it lacks a plate mark, having been one of several views printed from one printing plate and cut into separate sheets for issue. It soon became the standard view of New Amsterdam: shortly afterwards Nicolaes Visscher published a corrected version of Jansson's map and added the prospect in the bottom right corner and as he was the first publisher to admit to his work the 'New Amsterdam' became known as the Visscher view. In 1991 a pen, ink and watercolour sketch was uncovered in the Albertina Collection of the Austrian National Gallery, which is believed to be the prototype. DE KONING: From Van der Donck to Visscher (Mercator's World Vol 5, no 4, 2000).
[Ref: 15516]    £10,000.00 ($12,900 • €10,980 rates)


SCHENK, Pieter. [An early view of New York]
Nieu Amsterdam, een stedeken in Noord Amerikaes Nieu Hollant, op het eilant Manhattan: Namaels Nieu Jork Genaemt, to en het geraekte in't gebiet der Engleschen. Amsterdam, 1702. Old colour. 225 x 275mm.
A Dutch view of New York, based on the ''Restitutio'' view of 1673, when the Dutch briefly reclaimed the city. By the time this view was printed, in Schenk's ''Hecatompolis'' (Book of Town Views), New York was firmly back in British hands, but Schenk has added a large ship with a Dutch standard to reinforce their aspirations to regain control.
[Ref: 17630]    £4,250.00 ($5,483 • €4,667 rates)


HOLME, Thomas. [The first printed map of Pennsylvania]
A Mapp of Ye Improved Part of Pensilvania in America, Divided into Countyes, Townships and Lotts. To William Penn Esq. Proprietor & Governer of Pennsylvania This Mapp is Humbly Dedicated and Presented by Jn.o Harris. London: George Willdey, c.1715. 405 x 550mm.
An important map, being the first survey of William Penn's colony of Philadelphia, and containing the first plan of Philadelphia, the earliest map of any English city in America. Thomas Holme (1624-95) learned surveying in Cromwell's army, but became a Quaker after the end of the Civil War, which brought him into William Penn's circle. When Penn's original surveyor for the colony died en route to America, Holme was invited by Penn to take his place as Surveyor-General in 1682. He compiled a map of the new colony and carefully recorded the names of those who had bought property, and drew a plan of how the streets of Philadelphia were to be laid out. This street map is one of the first examples of urban planning. In May 1687 Penn requested a copy of Holme's map be send to London for publication, to encourage further migration. The map was issued in two formats: as a six-sheet wall map engraved by Francis Lamb, of which only four example still exist (Burden 628); and this single-sheet version, engraved by John Harris and originally published by Philip Lea c.1688. Like the six-sheet version it featured the plan of Philadelphia prominently. BURDEN: 669, state ii of iv.
[Ref: 16279]    £37,500.00 ($48,375 • €41,175 rates)


THORNTON, John, MORDEN, Robert, and LEA, Philip. [A rare English map of Carolina]
A New Mapp of Carolina. London: George Willdey, c.1715. 545 x 455mm.
A rare map of Carolina, with an inset of the Ashley and Cooper rivers and a list of the landowners of the colony. The map was originally published as part of a wall map of the British Empire in America, issued by Thornton, Morden and Lea in 1685, known by only one known example, in the Bibliotéque Nationale in Paris. Thornton and Morden sold their interest in this sheet to Lea, who issued it with only his name c.1695. BURDEN: 617, state 3.
[Ref: 16280]    £27,500.00 ($35,475 • €30,195 rates)


THORNTON, John, MORDEN, Robert, and LEA, Philip. [The English colonies in America with the first printed chart of New York Harbour]
A New Map of New England, New York, New Iarsey, Pensilvania, Maryland and Virginia by Philip Lea. London: George Willdey, c.1715. 445 x 545mm.
A rare map of the English colonies, showing the coast from Cape Henry north to Boston Harbour, one of the first to incorporate Augustine Herrman’s mapping of Virginia and Maryland. The inset is the first printed chart of New York Harbour, based on the manuscript drawn by Philip Wells for William Penn. The map was originally published as part of a wall map of the British Empire in America, issued by Thornton, Morden and Lea in 1685, known by only one known example, in the Bibliotéque Nationale in Paris. Thornton and Morden sold their interest in this sheet to Lea, who issued it with only his name c.1695, with a third state c.1698. This is the fourth and last state. BURDEN: 617, state 4.
[Ref: 16281]    £17,500.00 ($22,575 • €19,215 rates)


BROWNE, Christopher. [Senex edition of Browne's map of Maryland]
A New Map of Virginia, Maryland and the Improved Parts of Pennsylvania & New Jersey... London, John Senex, 1721, original outline colour, 490 x 550mm. Trimmed to printed border at bottom and just into printed border top left and right, expertly remargined with some manuscript fill. One small tear repaired.
The third state of Christopher Browne's important map of the Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay, Virginia, Maryland and part of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, first issued in 1685. Browne's map is the last major derivative of the Augustine Hermann Map of 1673, reoriented with north at the top and reduced to a single folio sheet. Philadelphia appears on the map. The Northern and Eastern boundaries of Maryland are shown. The boundary for Delaware (then part of Pennsylvania is shown), favouring the claims of Lord Baltimore, rather than the Cape Henelopen boundary, which was finally ratified by the British Courts when the dispute was settled in the 1730s and finally mapped by Mason & Dixon several decades later. New Jersey is divided into East and West Jersey. The shoals and soundings are drawn directly from the Hermann map. The cartouche depicts tobacco and shellfish, two of the significant products of the region during colonial times. From "A New General Atlas".
[Ref: 11037]    £2,300.00 ($2,967 • €2,525 rates)


BOWEN, Emanuel. [The first printed map of Georgia]
A New Map of Georgia, with Part of Carolina, Florida and Louisiana. Drawn from Original Draughts, assisted by the moft approved Maps and Charts. Collected by Eman: Bowen Geographer to his Majesty. London, 1748. 370 x 480mm.
The first map of Georgia, published only fifteen years after the colony's foundation by James Oglethorpe on February 12th 1733. It shows Charleston west to the Mississippi, and south to New Orleans and Cape Canaveral in Florida, marking the lands of the tribes both friendly and hostile and known trails. The borders of the province with Florida and Louisiana are purposefully vague (the 'G' of Georgia is west of Mississippi) as there had been no negotiation with the Spanish. Indeed, such was the expectation of war that Oglethorpe originally banned slavery as a security risk. The map was published in the 1748 edition of John Harris’ 'Navigantium atque Itinerantium Bibliotheca, or Complete Collection of Voyages and Travels', which contained a new chapter dedicated to Georgia, for which this map was engraved. As this was the official account of the colony, Bowen had access to the maps made by the colonists themselves. CUMMING: 267, Colour Plate 18.
[Ref: 15278]    £2,800.00 ($3,612 • €3,074 rates)


ROBERT DE VAUGONDY, Didier. Partie de L'Amerique Septentrionale, qui Comprend Le Cours de L'Ohio, La Nlle. Angleterre, La Nlle. York, Le New Jersey, La Pensylvanie, Le Maryland, La Virginie, La Caroline. Paris, c.1795. Original outline colour. 490 x 630mm.
The Eastern Seaboard and English Colonies, from New England to the Carolinas, extending West to the Mississippi River at the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers and north to the Illinois River, with a fine title cartouche and an inset of Carolina. This example was published after the French Revolution: Robert's Royal titles have been removed.
[Ref: 8954]    £450.00 ($581 • €494 rates)


Records: 51 to 60 of 461
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