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Records: 51 to 60 of 360
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  BRITISH ISLES 
 England 

HOOGHE, Romeyn de. [Monumental sea chart of south-west England]
Carte Maritime de l'Angleterre depuis les Sorlingues jusques à Portland... Amsterdam, Pierre Mortier, 1693. Coloured. Two sheets conjoined, total 600 x 950mm. Repairs to edges and a split in map area.
A superb sea chart of south-west England from the Scilly Isles to Portland, with an inset detail of the Scillies and prospects of Portland, Truro and Wolf Rock (half-way between the Scilly Isles and the Lizard, and a renowned maritime hazard). The chart appeared in one part of Mortier's 'Neptune François', titled 'Cartes Marines a l'Usage des Armées du Roy de la Grande Bretagne'. The nine charts of this section, all engraved by Romeyn de Hooghe, one of the foremost artist/etchers of the period, was described by Koeman as the 'most spectacular type of maritime cartography ever produced in 17th century Amsterdam'. Mortier's motives in the production of this atlas was to flatter the Dutch king on the British throne since the Glorious Revolution of 1688, William III, to whom it is dedicated. The unprecedented size of the atlas and the use of artists such as de Hooghe were not cheap: Again Koeman calls it the 'most expensive sea atlas' of the period, 'intended more as a show-piece than something to be used by the pilots as sea'. KOEMAN: vol 4. p. 423-4, M.Mor 5.
[Ref: 17872]    £2,800.00 ($3,696 • €3,136 rates)


VISSCHER, Nicolas. [An Anglo-Dutch separate-issue road map of England]
A New Mapp of the Kingdome of England Representing the Princedome of Wales, and other Provinces, Cities, Market Towns, with the Roads from Town to Town. And the Number of reputed Miles between them, are given by Inspection without Scale or Compass. Printed and given out by Nicolas Visscher upon the Dam at the signe of the Fischer... and are to be sold by John Overton at the White Horse without Newgate. Amsterdam,, c.1694. 570 x 500mm. Trimmed close to neatline, laid on contemporary paper as originally issued.
A callaboration between publishers in Amsterdam and London. A detailed map of England and Wales criss-crossed by straight lines representing roads. This state, about ten years after the first, is identified by the dedication to William III under the elaborate title cartouche supported by putti and surmounted with the Royal Arms. Shirley "British Isles" Visscher 2 , State 4 of 5.
[Ref: 10557]    £480.00 ($634 • €538 rates)


VISSCHER, Nicolas. [17th century sea chart of the English Channel]
Manica, Gallis La Manche, et Belgis Het Canaal, Pars Oceani inter Angliam et Galliam... Amsterdam, c.1698. Original colour. 480 x 570mm. A fine example
A chart of the English Channel, showing the British coastline from Cardigan to Orford and the Continental coast from Calais to Nantes, with the River Seine to Paris.
[Ref: 15700]    £650.00 ($858 • €728 rates)


WILLDEY, George. [Superbly-decorated map of Ogilby's roads of England and Wales]
The Roads of England According to Mr Ogilby's Survey. London: George Willdey, c.1713. Contemporary colour refreshed. 590 x 595mm. Repairs to folds, laid on archival paper.
A scarce separate-issue map of England and Wales arranged to show the roads as surveyed for John Ogilby's 'Britannia'. To make the detail marked on the roads clear (for example the distances between towns) the geographical outline of the country is distorted, fitting into a circle. Bottom left there is no attempt to show the Cornish peninsula, yet Land's End is marked. The rich borders are decorated with acanthus leaves, with roundels containing armorials. The map is unusual in that it was printed from two plates, a circular plate, 525mm in diameter, for the map and a second plate for the border. As this border has no distinct 'up', examples exist where the border is rotated in relation to the map into all four cardinals. This example is rotated 90º clockwise to the illustration in Shirley. The map can also be found without the border. Ogilby's 'Britannia' was the world's first printed road atlas, published 1675, a hugely-influential publication; soon his roads started appearing on British county maps, and, nearly forty years later, Ogilby's work was still being used. SHIRLEY: Willdey 1, 'striking road map'; this second state, not listed in Shirley, has apparent 'crossing-out' lines through Willdey's imprint.
[Ref: 16276]    £4,250.00 ($5,610 • €4,760 rates)


SAXTON, Christopher. [Saxton's map of South East England]
Sussex, Surry and Kent, by C.S. Corrected and Amended with many Additions by Phil Lea. Cantii, Southsexiæ, Surriæ et Middelsexiæ comitat. Una cum suis Undique confinibus, Oppidis, pagis, Villis, et Fluminibus, in eisdem vera descriptio. London: George Willdey, c.1715. Original outline colour. 410 x 540mm.
A scarce map of South East England, depictng Surrey, Sussex, Kent and, despite not being listed in the English title, Middlesex. The map first appeared in Saxton's atlas of England and Wales published 1579, the first county atlas. The plate has a long and interesting history. It was engraved by Remigius Hogenberg (c.1536-c.1588), older brother of Frans (engraver of the Ortelius atlas and the Braun & Hogenberg townplans), when the pair were taking refuge in England from the religious turmoil in the southern Netherlands. When John Speed copied most of Saxton's maps for his 'Theatre' atlas of 1611, he decided to use individual maps of these counties by John Norden instead. Superceded by Speed, Saxton's plates lay unused until 1645, when William Web published a new edition, with this map only updated with the arms of Charles I and the date 1642. After a 'ghost' edition of c.1665, the next edition was published by Philip Lea (c.1689), when the English title, the hundreds and symbols (crosses, crowns & mitres) were added. A second Lea edition (c.1693) saw the addition of Ogilby's roads, five armorials and Lea's address added under the original Latin title. Willdey was the next publisher, leaving Lea's details but adding his own along the bottom edge, as this example. A final edition of the atlas was published by Thomas Jefferys in 1749, 170 years after the first edition!
[Ref: 18099]    £1,850.00 ($2,442 • €2,072 rates)


HOMANN, Johann Baptist. [An early Georgian map of England]
Magnae Britanniae Pars Meridionalis in qua Regnum Angliae tam in Septem Antiqua Anglo-Saxonum Regna... . Nuremberg, c.1730. Original colour with later additions 575 x 490mm.
Map of England and Wales, with an elaborate allegorical title cartouche and a vignette scene of Queen Anne and her councillors. The colouring of England marks the boundaries of the seven Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, predating the Norman Conquest of 1066.
[Ref: 13373]    £400.00 ($528 • €448 rates)


PINE, John. [The story of the Spanish Armada from the House of Lords tapestries]
[The Spanish Armada entering the English Channel.] London, John Pine, 1739. Printed from three plates, outer plate 380 x 610mm.
A pair of sea charts of the English Channel, printed in blue, within a decorative border printed from a third plate. The left plate shows the Spanish Armada of 1588 entering the Channel, blown by a delicately-engraved windhead, watched by two putti and an allegorical figure of Britannia. The right plate shows the Armada in the famous crescent formation, with the English fleet behind them, pushing them up the Channel. In the centre of the decorative border is a portrait of Elizabeth I. This is a plate from 'The Tapestry Hangings of the House of Lords', drawn by by Hubert-François Gravelot, engraved and published by John Pine. It depicts one of ten tapestries commissioned from the Dutch marine painter Hendrik Cornelisz Vroom by Lord Howard of Effingham in 1591 to commemorate the defeat of the Armada. Unfortunately they were destroyed when the Houses of Parliament burnt down in 1834, leaving Pine's book as the only record. It is lucky that Pine worried that "'Time, or Accident, or moths may deface these valuable shadows". MCC: 4.
[Ref: 12114]    £1,200.00 ($1,584 • €1,344 rates)


PINE, John. [The story of the Spanish Armada from the House of Lords tapestries]
[The English sending the fire-ships in among the Spanish Fleet.] London, John Pine, 1739. Printed from three plates, outer plate 380 x 610mm.
A pair of sea charts of the English Channel, printed in blue, within a decorative border printed from a third plate. The left plate shows the Spanish Armada at anchor off Calais, and the eight fire-ships bearing down on them, blown by a delicately-engraved windhead. The right plate shows the Armada, having cut their anchors to escape the fire-ships, fleeing north in disarray. The decorative border has roundel portraits of Elizabeth I, Pope Sixtus V, Phillip II of Spain and Alessandro Farnese, governor of the Spanish Netherlands, and two putti weeping over the loss of life. A lighter note is struck by the text in Latin and English: "Upon the disappearance of this mighty Fleet, the following Writing was fixed up to Pasquin at Rome. The Pope from the Plenitude of his Power will grant Indulgences for a thousand Years, if any one will inform him with certainty, what is become of the Spanish Fleet, where it is gone; whether it be taken up into Heaven, sunk down into Tartarus, suspended somewhere in the Air, or floating upon some Sea." This is a plate from 'The Tapestry Hangings of the House of Lords', drawn by by Hubert-François Gravelot, engraved and published by John Pine. It depicts one of ten tapestries commissioned from the Dutch marine painter Hendrik Cornelisz Vroom by Lord Howard of Effingham in 1591 to commemorate the defeat of the Armada. Unfortunately they were destroyed when the Houses of Parliament burnt down in 1834, leaving Pine's book as the only record. It is lucky that Pine worried that "'Time, or Accident, or moths may deface these valuable shadows". MCC: 4.
[Ref: 12117]    £1,200.00 ($1,584 • €1,344 rates)


SEUTTER, Matthäus. [England divided into the Saxon Heptarchy]
Britanniæ sive Angliæ Regnum, tam secundum prisca Anglo-Saxonum Imperia... Augsburg, c.1740. Original body colour. 575 x 490mm. Dark impression, very fine example.
Seutter's map of England & Wales, with contemporary placenames but coloured to separate the Saxon kingdoms that existed before the Norman Conquest in 1066. The fine allegorical title cartouche represents the wealth of the country, including ships, sheep and knowledge. SHIRLEY: British Isles 1650-1750, Seutter 2, state 2.
[Ref: 15383]    £380.00 ($502 • €426 rates)


BUCK, Samuel & Nathaniel. [The Buck prospect of Liverpool]
The South West Prospect of Liverpoole, in the County Palatine of Lancaster. London: S. & N. Buck, 1728-. 255 x 715mm.
A prospect of Liverpool with a short description and a 20-point key. It was published in a series of 'Cities and Towns', available separately and bound. At the time they were printed each sheet would half cost approximately half a crown each.
[Ref: 16911]    £600.00 ($792 • €672 rates)


Records: 51 to 60 of 360
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