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Records: 61 to 70 of 461
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  AMERICA 
 Eastern Seaboard 

ELLICOTT, Andrew. [The famous Ellicott's plan for Washington DC]
Plan of the City of Washington in the Territory of Columbia, ceded by the States of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the Seat of their Government after the Year 1800. London, 1795. 420 x 540mm. Binding folds flattened.
An early copy of Andrew Ellicott's map of the planned Federal capital, engraved by John Russell after the map by John Reid published in Winterbotham's 'An Historical Geographical, Commercial and Philosophical View of the United States' in 1795. It shows the layout of the streets in both Washington and Georgetown, with 'The President's House', National Mall and Capitol.
[Ref: 17920]    £3,200.00 ($4,128 • €3,514 rates)


WILSON, Charles. [A sea chart of the Eastern Seaboard from Boston to Cape Lookout]
Sheets 1 & 2. Boston to the Chesapeake, &c. Corrections 1878. London: Charles Wilson, 1878. Touches of original colour. Two sheets conjoined, laid on canvas, total 890 x 1400mm. Some minor creasing and staining.
A two-sheet chart published as one of a pair that covered the Eastearn Seaboard from Boston to Havana in Cuba. Three large inset details show New York Harbour, Boston Harbour and the Entrance to the Delaware; the three smaller insets are Okracoke Inlet, Hatteras Shoals and Cape Charles. The lighthouses are marked in colour and the extents of the Gulf Stream are shown.
[Ref: 17409]    £3,250.00 ($4,193 • €3,569 rates)


GUILD & Co., C.H. [An advertisers' map of New England]
C.H. Guild & Co.'s Newspaper Map of New England Prepared Expressly to Accompany "Advertising in New England," A Complete Handbook for 1896-7. Boston, M.A.: Guild & Co., 1896. Wood-engraving, printed in colour. Sheet 1215 x 880mm. Nicks in margins, folds reinforced in places.
A fascinating guide to the best places to advertise in New England at the end of the 19th century. The map itself is coloured according to population density and the towns are marked according to their commercial character: manufacturing, agricultural, or foreign or domestic commerce. Towns with one paper, more than one paper, and those with daily and weekly papers are numbered 1-3. Published in the last decade of the 19th century this is an unusal artifact of the early years of the American advertising industry. Guild boasted that he was able to "place advertising business in any place the world over" (Brooklyn Life, 1894).
[Ref: 15688]    £3,250.00 ($4,193 • €3,569 rates)


HAGSTROM, Co. [New York's Subway system in the 1940s]
New York Subways. Hagstrom, c. 1946. 240 x 440mm.
Folding leaflet map of Subway Systems and Elevated lines of the City of New York - courtesy of the New York Telephone Company. Produced for Military and Navy Personnel with adverts on the back inviting them to visit 'the Public telephone Center for the Armed Forces'.
[Ref: 17554]    £160.00 ($206 • €176 rates)


 Western USA 

FER, Nicolas de. [De Fer's large-format map of the island of California]
La Californie ou Nouvelle Caroline, Teatro de los Trabajos Apostolicos De Compa.e. Jesus en la America Sept. Dressé sur celle que le Viceroy de la Nouvelle Espagne... Paris, 1720. Original outline colour. 460 x 665mm.
The largest representation of the island of California on a single-sheet map. It is an enlarged version of Fer's map of 1700, allowing the 314 names in the original key to be moved onto the map. In place of the key is a text telling the history of California up to 1695, and four vignettes. Bottom left is a cartouche, illustrated with creatures including a Spoonbill and an armadillo, which seems to be lacking extra text. Most of the detail in the Mexican interior comes from the work of Father Eusebio Francisco Kino (1645-1711), an Italian Jesuit. It is interesting that it was Kino first claimed California was joined to the mainland, as early as 1702. This is the best example we have ever seen. MCLAUGHLIN: 196.
[Ref: 16627]    £8,500.00 ($10,965 • €9,333 rates)


 Gulf States 

IMRAY, James. [A 'blue-back' sea chart of the Gulf of Mexico from New Orleans to Tampa]
Gulf of Mexico. Chart No 1. (Tampa Bay to New Orleans). Compiled from Surveys made by order of the United States Govenment. London: James Imray & Son, 1902. Touches of original colour. Two sheets conjoined, laid on blue paper with publisher's title label, edged with linen, total 890 x 1330mm. With chart-seller's ink stamps. Two small tears in top edge, some pencil markings.
A working chart of the north coasts of the Gulf of Mexico, with parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Lighthouses are marked with colour. Insets are: Passes of the Mississippi; Entrance to Mobile Bay; Pensicola; St Andrew; East Pass; & Apalachicola. The ink stamps are of 'J. Blowey, Optician and Chronometer maker, Southside Street, Plymouth'.
[Ref: 17407]    £1,700.00 ($2,193 • €1,867 rates)


 Hawaii 

COOK, Captain James. [The "pirate" Dublin edition of the First Printed map of Hawaii (Owhyhee)]
Chart of the Sandwich Islands. Dublin: The United Company of Booksellers, 1784. 280 x 480mm. A very fine example.
One of the earliest printed chart of Cook's route around the Hawaiian islands, which he discovered in November 1778, with an inset of Karakakooa Bay, where he met his death in February 1779. The islands are named: Owyhee, Mowee, Morotoi, Ranai, Woahoo, Atooi and Oneeheow. The map was engraved by J. Butler for the Irish pirate edition of the account of Cook's third voyage. The United Company of Booksellers was a loose conglomeration of publishers: the National Library of Canada states the 1784 Dublin edition was published by H. Chamberlaine and 26 others!
[Ref: 7850]    £1,400.00 ($1,806 • €1,537 rates)


 Canada 

ROSS, John. [John Ross's discoveries in the Gulf of Boothia]
To His Most Excellent Majesty William IVth, King of Great Britain, Ireland &c. This Chart of the Discoveries made in the Arctic Regions, in 1829, 30, 31, 32, & 33, is dedicated... London: John Ross, 1834. Original colour. 465 x 615mm. Binding folds flattened
A map of the discoveries of John Ross and his nephew, John Clark Ross, in the Gulf of Boothia, with five coastal profiles. On an expedition to find the North West Passage Ross was the first European to enter the gulf, although it had been seen by Parry in 1822, naming it after their patron, gin-magnate Sir Felix Booth. They spent the next four years stuck in ice, during which time John Clark Ross became the first European to reach the Magnetic North Pole, then at Cape Adelaide on the Boothia Peninsula. Eventually the crew left their ship and were rescued by a whaler, who thought they had perished two years before. This map was published in Ross's 'Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-West Passage'.
[Ref: 17439]    £360.00 ($464 • €395 rates)


 West Indies 

LIGON, RIchard. [Scarce French edition of an English map of Barbados]
Description Topographique et mesure de l'Isle des Barbades aux Indies Occidentales avec les Noms de ceux a qui appartiement les habitations. Paris, 1674. 390 x 550mm. Trimmed close to printed border lower right for binding, as issued, minor staining.
An early map of the English settlements in Barbados, marking the owners of the plantations. Richard Ligon (1585?-1662) lost his fortune in the upheavals of the English Civil War, finding himself a 'stranger in my own country'. He decided to leave for Barbados in 1647 but, having contracted a fever, returned to England in 1650, where his creditors had him imprisoned for debt. He started work on an account of his time in the West Indies, which was published as 'A True and Exact History of the Island of Barbadoes' in 1657. A second edition followed in 1673, with this French edition the following year where this rare antique map was issued.
[Ref: 12420]    £2,900.00 ($3,741 • €3,184 rates)


OTTENS, Reinier & Joshua. [A magnificent wall map of the West Indies showing the War of Jenkin's Ear]
Grand Theatre de la Guerre en Amerique Suivant les Plus Novelles observations des Espagnols, Anglois, Francois & Hollandois. Amsterdam: Ottens, c.1741. Original colour. Six sheets conjoined, total 850 x 1590mm. Verdigris weaknesses reinforced on verso.
A monumental map of the West Indies published to illustrate the War of Jenkins' Ear (1739-1742), which broke out because of Spanish attempts to hamper British trade with Spain's colonies in the Americas. The eight inset maps shown St. Augustine, Havana, 'la Ville Espagnole de S. Domingue'; Porto Bello, Carthagena, Curaçao, Acapulco & Vera-Cruz. The war gained its name from an incident of eight years earlier: in 1731 Robert Jenkins was returning home from Jamaica in his brig the 'Rebecca' when the Spanish coastguard stopped him on suspicion of smuggling. Jenkins was tied to a mast and had one of his ears cut off by the Spanish captain, who handed it back instructing him to tell King George II that the 'same will happen to him if caught doing the same'. Trade rivalry continued and, at the end of the decade, Britain was concerned that Spain would withdraw the 'asiento' (permission for the British to sell slaves in Spanish America). In a Parliamentary debate about the possible loss of this lucrative trade, Jenkins waved his ear at the MPs and gave the pro-war faction a cause that the general public could understand.
[Ref: 13926]    £12,500.00 ($16,125 • €13,725 rates)


Records: 61 to 70 of 461
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