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Records: 61 to 70 of 226
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  AMERICA 
 Eastern Seaboard 

MORTIER, Pieter. [The first map of South Carolina published outside England]
Carte Particuliere de la Caroline. Dresse sur les Memoires le plus Nouveau Par le Sieue S***. Amsterdam, 1696. Original colour. 405 x 605mm.
A chart of the coastline of Carolina from the South Edisto River to the Santee River, with the names and locations of the plantations around Charleston. Although the title credits Sanson ('Sieur S') it is copied from John Thornton & Robert Morden's scarce map of 1695, the first to name South Carolina. It was first published in Mortier's 'Suite de Neptune François' sea-atlas, but also appeared in his pirate of Jaillot's 'Atlas Nouveau'. The map also notes a number of Indian settlements and shows the early roads in the region. First state, lacking the plate number which distinguishes the 2nd state from the first. BURDEN: 768. KOEMAN: Mor 1; CUMMING: 121, colour plate 10.
[Ref: 18931]    £3,200.00 ($4,157 • €3,626 rates)


HOLME, Thomas. [The first printed map of Pennsylvania]
A Mapp of Ye Improved Part of Pensilvania in America, Divided into Countyes, Townships and Lotts. To William Penn Esq. Proprietor & Governer of Pennsylvania This Mapp is Humbly Dedicated and Presented by Jn.o Harris. London: George Willdey, c.1715. 405 x 550mm. London: George Willdey, c.1715. 405 x 550mm.
An important map, being the first survey of William Penn's colony of Philadelphia, and containing the first plan of Philadelphia, the earliest map of any English city in America. Thomas Holme (1624-95) learned surveying in Cromwell's army, but became a Quaker after the end of the Civil War, which brought him into William Penn's circle. When Penn's original surveyor for the colony died en route to America, Holme was invited by Penn to take his place as Surveyor-General in 1682. He compiled a map of the new colony and carefully recorded the names of those who had bought property, and drew a plan of how the streets of Philadelphia were to be laid out. This street map is one of the first examples of urban planning. In May 1687 Penn requested a copy of Holme's map be send to London for publication, to encourage further migration. The map was issued in two formats: as a six-sheet wall map engraved by Francis Lamb, of which only four example still exist (Burden 628); and this single-sheet version, engraved by John Harris and originally published by Philip Lea c.1688. Like the six-sheet version it featured the plan of Philadelphia prominently. BURDEN: 669, state ii of iv.
[Ref: 16279]    £37,500.00 ($48,713 • €42,488 rates)


ALLARD, Hugo. [The Eastern Seaboard with the 'Restitutio' view of New York]
Totius Neobelgii Nova et Accuratissima Tabula. Amsterdam: Reiner & Josua Ottens, c.1725. Original colour. 465 x 545mm. In pristine condition.
Hugo Allard's edition of the Jansson-Visscher map, updated with the 'Restitutio' view of New York, drawn during the short occupation by the Dutch in 1673. It shows the colony much enlarged since the English took it in 1664, with the defensive wall where Wall Street is now. Under Long Island the fleet of Vice Admiral Cornelius Evertsen, who took New York in 1673, is marked, BURDEN: 373, state 7 of 7.
[Ref: 18268]    £8,000.00 ($10,392 • €9,064 rates)


BOWEN, Emanuel. [The first printed map of Georgia]
A New Map of Georgia, with Part of Carolina, Florida and Louisiana. Drawn from Original Draughts, assisted by the most approved Maps and Charts. Collected by Eman: Bowen Geographer to his Majesty. London, 1748. 370 x 480mm.
The first map of Georgia, published only fifteen years after the colony's foundation by James Oglethorpe on February 12th 1733. It shows Charleston west to the Mississippi, and south to New Orleans and Cape Canaveral in Florida, marking the lands of the tribes both friendly and hostile and known trails. The borders of the province with Florida and Louisiana are purposefully vague (the 'G' of Georgia is west of Mississippi) as there had been no negotiation with the Spanish. Indeed, such was the expectation of war that Oglethorpe originally banned slavery as a security risk. The map was published in the 1748 edition of John Harris’ 'Navigantium atque Itinerantium Bibliotheca, or Complete Collection of Voyages and Travels', which contained a new chapter dedicated to Georgia, for which this map was engraved. As this was the official account of the colony, Bowen had access to the maps made by the colonists themselves. CUMMING: 267, Colour Plate 18.
[Ref: 15278]    £2,800.00 ($3,637 • €3,172 rates)


LEIZELT, Balthasar Frederick. [An 18th century 'vue d'optique' of New York]
Vue de la Nouvelle Yorck Augsburg, c.1775. Original colour. 315 x 420mm. Some wear to the margins. An ink spot on the French side of the text.
An unusual 'vue d'optique', an imaginary view of the port of New York, with shipyards, docks and a large customs house. Below the image is an engraved description in both German and French which loosely translates to: "New York, a city in North America on the Island named Manhattan at the mouth of the Hudson River, which was first settled by the Dutch in 1615 and called New Amsterdam. In 1666 it was taken over by the British and named New York'. Because the print was designed as a 'vue d'optique' the title 'Vuë de la Nouvelle Yorck' is engraved in reverse above the scene. The sheet woud be be placed in a 'zograscope', an optical device that used lenses and mirrors to give perspective. but reversed the image.
[Ref: 18896]    £600.00 ($779 • €680 rates)


LEIZELT, Balthasar Frederick. [A 'vue d'optique' of Philadelphia]
Vuë de Philadelphie. Augsburg, c.1776, original colour, 315 x 420mm
An unusual and attractive 'vue d'optique' of Philadelphia taking as its actual model the Royal Naval Hospital at Greenwich, England. Philadelphia is fancifully represented as a seaport city with a naval skirmish taking place in the harbour. This type of print was designed to be looked at through a zograscope, an optical viewer that gave the prints a feeling of depth. The naive style of colouring is standard for these prints which were used to disseminate current affairs as well as for amusement. SNYDER, City of Independence: Views of Philadelphia Before 1800, 242.
[Ref: 10429]    £400.00 ($520 • €453 rates)


SOULES, Henri. [A near-contemporary plan of the Battle of Yorktown]
Plan d'York en Virginie avec les attaques et les Campemens de l'Armée combinée de France et d'Amerique. Paris: Buisson, 1787. Original colour. 300 x 390mm, on blue-tinted paper. Lower left margin trimmed by binder and reinstated.
A plan of the last major battle of the American Revolution, when a joint Franco-American army forced the British army under General Cornwallis to surrender. It was published in 'Histoire des Troubles de L'Amerique Anglaise, Ecrite sur les Memoires les Plus Authentiques' by François Soules, regarded as the best French history of the war.
[Ref: 18299]    £800.00 ($1,039 • €906 rates)


ELLICOTT, Andrew. [The famous Ellicott's plan for Washington DC]
Plan of the City of Washington in the Territory of Columbia, ceded by the States of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the Seat of their Government after the Year 1800. London, 1795. 420 x 540mm. Binding folds flattened.
An early copy of Andrew Ellicott's map of the planned Federal capital, engraved by John Russell after the map by John Reid published in Winterbotham's 'An Historical Geographical, Commercial and Philosophical View of the United States' in 1795. It shows the layout of the streets in both Washington and Georgetown, with 'The President's House', National Mall and Capitol.
[Ref: 17920]    £2,750.00 ($3,572 • €3,116 rates)


POULSON, John. [A scarce broadsheet guide to a 19th century solar eclipse in Philadelphia]
Approaching Solar Eclipse. The lovers of Astronomical Science will perhaps be highly gratified with the opportunity which may on Monday be afforded them, of beholding this interesting phenomenon... Philadelphia: printed by John Poulson, n.d., but 1806. Letterpress broadsheet with wood-engraved diagram and border. Sheet 535 x 220mm. Repair to split in fold repaired with loss of a line of text; a few other letters mis-inked.
Broadsheet with a wood engraved diagram of the phases of the solar eclipse due on June 16, 1806, as seen from Philadelphia. The text starts: 'The Lovers of Astronomical Science will perhaps be highly gratified with the opportunity which may on Monday may be affored to them, of beholding this interesting phenonenon'.
[Ref: 11962]    £4,000.00 ($5,196 • €4,532 rates)


Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. [19th century town plan of New York]
New York. London, SDUK, 1840. Coloured. Steel engraving. 320 x 390mm.
Detailed town plan of New York, with vignette views of Broadway and City Hall, marking the routes of the railways into the city.
[Ref: 16497]    £450.00 ($585 • €510 rates)


Records: 61 to 70 of 226
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