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Records: 61 to 65 of 65
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  BRITISH ISLES 
 Road Maps 

OGILBY, John. [Early map of the roads from Tuxford - York]
The Continuation of the Road from London to Barwick... London, c.1675, second state. Coloured. 330 x 445mm.
The third sheet of the road from London to Berwick-on-Tweet, showing the route from rom Tuxford to York, via Doncaster and Tadcaster. Plate 7 from Ogilby's 'Britannia', the first national road-atlas of any country in Western Europe. It was composed of maps of seventy-three major roads and cross-roads, presented as trompe-l'œil scrolls, each with a decorative title cartouche. It was the first English atlas on a uniform scale, at one inch to a mile, and the 'mile' Ogilby used became the national standard, the statute mile of 1,760 yards. Ogilby claimed that 26,600 miles of roads were surveyed in the course of preparing the atlas, on foot pushing a surveyor's wheel, but only about 7,500 were actually depicted in print. It was only after the 'Britannia' that roads started being shown on county maps.
[Ref: 16363]    £220.00 ($281 • €247 rates)


OGILBY, John. [Early map of the road from Hereford to Leicester]
The Road from Hereford to Leicester London, c.1675, second state. Coloured. 330 x 445mm. Slight restoration to centre fold in title.
The complete route from Hereford to Leicester, via Worcester, Bromsgrove and Coventry. Plate 72 from Ogilby's 'Britannia', the first national road-atlas of any country in Western Europe. It was composed of maps of seventy-three major roads and cross-roads, presented as trompe-l'œil scrolls, each with a decorative title cartouche. It was the first English atlas on a uniform scale, at one inch to a mile, and the 'mile' Ogilby used became the national standard, the statute mile of 1,760 yards. Ogilby claimed that 26,600 miles of roads were surveyed in the course of preparing the atlas, on foot pushing a surveyor's wheel, but only about 7,500 were actually depicted in print. It was only after the 'Britannia' that roads started being shown on county maps.
[Ref: 16364]    £200.00 ($256 • €224 rates)


OGILBY, John. [Early road map of the roads from London to Stilton in Cambridgeshire]
The Road from London to Barwick... London, c.1675, second state. Coloured. 330 x 445mm.
A first sheet of five showing the roads from London to Berwick-on-Tweed, reaching Stilton in Cambridgeshire (then in Huntingdonshire), following the modern A1, via Tottenham, Ware & Huntingdon. Plate 29 from Ogilby's 'Britannia', the first national road-atlas of any country in Western Europe. It was composed of maps of seventy-three major roads and cross-roads, presented as trompe-l'œil scrolls, each with a decorative title cartouche, this being one of only four featuring the way-wiser. It was the first English atlas on a uniform scale, at one inch to a mile, and the 'mile' Ogilby used became the national standard, the statute mile of 1,760 yards. Ogilby claimed that 26,600 miles of roads were surveyed in the course of preparing the atlas, on foot pushing a surveyor's wheel, but only about 7,500 were actually depicted in print. It was only after the 'Britannia' that roads started being shown on county maps.
[Ref: 16325]    £280.00 ($358 • €314 rates)


OGILBY, John. [Early road map of the roads from London to Newhaven and Shoreham and Brighton]
The Road from London to Newhaven... Continued from Newhaven to New-Shoreham... London, 1675, first state. Coloured. 330 x 445mm. Plate number added in old ink mss.
The complete route, via Streatham, Croydon, East Grinstead and Lewes. The continuation passes through Brighton (here 'Brightelmeston & Hove. Plate 29 from Ogilby's 'Britannia', the first national road-atlas of any country in Western Europe. It was composed of maps of seventy-three major roads and cross-roads, presented as trompe-l'œil scrolls, each with a decorative title cartouche, this being one of only four featuring the way-wiser. It was the first English atlas on a uniform scale, at one inch to a mile, and the 'mile' Ogilby used became the national standard, the statute mile of 1,760 yards. Ogilby claimed that 26,600 miles of roads were surveyed in the course of preparing the atlas, on foot pushing a surveyor's wheel, but only about 7,500 were actually depicted in print. It was only after the 'Britannia' that roads started being shown on county maps. This example comes from the first state, before a plate mumber was added bottom right. Second state, with plate number bottom right.
[Ref: 18208]    £425.00 ($543 • €476 rates)


OGILBY, John. [Facsimile of Ogilby's 'Britannia' road atlas]
Britannia Vol 1. or an Illustration of ye Kingdom of England and Dominion of Wales By a Geographical or Historical Description of the Principal Roads. London: Arthur Duckham, 1939. Oblong 4to, original cloth gilt; descriptive label on front pastedown; pp. (7)+101 facsimile road maps. A few signs of age.
A facsimile of Europe's first printed road atlas, originally published 1675, with a general map and 100 plates of the roads of England and Wales, shown as strip maps on trompe l'oeil scrolls. When Duckham's original copy of the Britannia came up at auction it was described as the only known example in contemporary colour.
[Ref: 18243]    £48.00 ($61 • €54 rates)


Records: 61 to 65 of 65
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