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Records: 71 to 80 of 399
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  AMERICA 
 United States 

HILL, John William. [A large mid-19th century prospect of Boston]
Boston. London: Paul & Dominic Colnaghi; New York: Smith Brothers; Boston: Sowles & Wards; and Paris: François Delarue, 1857. Coloured proof steel engraving on chine collé, laid on original printed backing sheet. Total 735 x 1065mm. Some slight creasing and surface abrasion.
A large and impressive view of Boston from the harbour, illustrating the international shipping that made the port so vibrant. It was painted by John William Hill (1812-79, son of the English aquatinter John Hill, who had settled in New York in 1822), commissioned by Benjamin Franklin Smith (1830-1927). However, to spread the cost of such a large plate, it was published by a consortium of publishers in New York, Boston, London and Paris, including the Colnaghi brothers, who hired Charles Mottram to engrave the plate. Mottram (1807-76) had also engraved Hill's prospect of New York from Brooklyn in 1855.
[Ref: 18442]    £1,400.00 ($1,841 • €1,590 rates)


STANFORD, Edward. [Folding wall map of the United States, in fine colour]
Stanford's Map of the United States and part of the Dominion of Canada. London, Stanford, 1874. Original colour. Dissected and laid on linen as issed, total 940 x 1540mm, with publisher's slipcase Paper lightly toned, some wear.
A large and colourful map of the United States, with the railways marked in red. An inset contains Nova Scotia and Newfoundland.
[Ref: 12386]    £1,250.00 ($1,644 • €1,420 rates)


 Eastern Seaboard 

HONDIUS, Jodocus. [A 17th century miniature map of Virginia and northern Florida]
Virginia et Florida. Amsterdam, 1610, Latin text edition. Coloured. 150 x 185mm.
When this map was first published in 1607 it was the only regional map of North America in the Mercator/Hondius 'Atlas Minor'. It is a reduced version of Hondius's own folio map, in turn derived from John White's Virginia & Jacques le Moyne's Florida as interpreted by Theodore de Bry (1591). In 1621 the printing plate was sold to a London publisher, who republished it in 'Purchas His Pilgrimies'. Later Dutch editions used new plates by Jansson. BURDEN: 155.
[Ref: 18281]    £530.00 ($697 • €602 rates)


HALL, Ralph. [The first English derivative of John Smith's map of Virginia]
Virginia. London: Michael Sparke, 1636. 170 x 240mm. A pristine example
A scarce map of Virginia, orientated with north to the right, loosely based on John Smith's map of the environs of the new English colony at Roanoke. Engraved on a smaller scale by Ralph Hall, it was intended to be included in 'Historia mundi: or Mercator's atlas', an English edition of the Hondius miniature atlas, with text translated by Wye Saltonstall. However the plate had not been completed by the time the first edition was published in 1635, so an errata slip was added, claiming the map had been drawn in Virginia and explaining that 'when it comes, every buyer of the Booke shall have it given him gratis'. Being on a smaller scale much of the detail of Smith's map has been dropped and vignettes from Smith's illustrations (as published by de Bry) have been added. The Royal Arms and scene of Powhatan's council remain in the top left and centre, but the large native with a bow is much reduced. A native carnel house and village have been placed in the right corners and other vignettes, including Europeans firing muskets, galleons, canoes, a seamonster and pigs, around the map. Curiously a leopard appears with a river running over its back, and the engraver has invented 'Hall=poynt', adding his name to the terrain. BURDEN: 244.
[Ref: 18909]    £15,500.00 ($20,383 • €17,608 rates)


SCHENK, Pieter. [An early view of New York]
Nieu Amsterdam, een stedeken in Noord Amerikaes Nieu Hollant, op het eilant Manhattan: Namaels Nieu Jork Genaemt, to en het geraekte in't gebiet der Engleschen. Amsterdam, 1702. Old colour. 225 x 275mm.
A Dutch view of New York, based on the ''Restitutio'' view of 1673, when the Dutch briefly reclaimed the city. By the time this view was printed, in Schenk's ''Hecatompolis'' (Book of Town Views), New York was firmly back in British hands, but Schenk has added a large ship with a Dutch standard to reinforce their aspirations to regain control.
[Ref: 17630]    £3,500.00 ($4,603 • €3,976 rates)


MONTANUS, Arnoldus. [17th century map of Virginia]
Nova Virginiæ Tabula. London: John Ogilby, 1671. Coloured. 295 x 355mm.
The environs of Chesapeake Bay published in Ogilby's 'America', an English edition of Montanus' 'De Nieuwe En Onbekende Weereld'. Derived from the John Smith map of 1612 it ignores the development of Maryland, and for some reason has a llama and a unicorn in the title cartouche. The same plate was used for the Dutch edition of the same year, published by Meurs.
[Ref: 8724]    £950.00 ($1,249 • €1,079 rates)


SPEED, John. [An early issue of the map of the English colonies of New England and New York]
A Map of New England and New York. London: Thomas Bassett & Richard Chiswell, 1675. Blank verso. Contemporary outline colour. 385 x 505mm. Two old repaired tears; a very fine dark impression.
An important map of the two provinces published a little over a decade after the English took New York City from the Dutch in 1664. It shows the Eastern Seaboard from Penobscot south to Delaware Bay, with the cartography taken from the Jansson/Visscher 'Belgii Novi' map, although it omits most of Chesapeake Bay as that area was detailed on another new map. Although the map is usually attributed to Speed, it was engraved by Francis Lamb for the 1676 edition of his 'Prospect of the Most Famous Parts of the World' (the first English world atlas, first published 1627), by which time Speed had been dead for nearly half a century. It was usually issued in the atlas with text printed on the reverse, however it is known that pre-atlas examples were sold from 1675 without text, as this example. BURDEN: 455, 'one of the first maps to depict the English pre-eminence in the region.
[Ref: 18606]    £9,500.00 ($12,493 • €10,792 rates)


MORTIER, Pieter. [The first map of South Carolina published outside England]
Carte Particuliere de la Caroline. Dresse sur les Memoires le plus Nouveau Par le Sieue S***. Amsterdam, 1696. Original colour. 405 x 605mm.
A chart of the coastline of Carolina from the South Edisto River to the Santee River, with the names and locations of the plantations around Charleston. Although the title credits Sanson ('Sieur S') it is copied from John Thornton & Robert Morden's scarce map of 1695, the first to name South Carolina. It was first published in Mortier's 'Suite de Neptune François' sea-atlas, but also appeared in his pirate of Jaillot's 'Atlas Nouveau'. The map also notes a number of Indian settlements and shows the early roads in the region. First state, lacking the plate number which distinguishes the 2nd state from the first. BURDEN: 768. KOEMAN: Mor 1; CUMMING: 121, colour plate 10.
[Ref: 18931]    £3,200.00 ($4,208 • €3,635 rates)


HOLME, Thomas. [The first printed map of Pennsylvania]
A Mapp of Ye Improved Part of Pensilvania in America, Divided into Countyes, Townships and Lotts. To William Penn Esq. Proprietor & Governer of Pennsylvania This Mapp is Humbly Dedicated and Presented by Jn.o Harris. London: George Willdey, c.1715. 405 x 550mm. London: George Willdey, c.1715. 405 x 550mm.
An important map, being the first survey of William Penn's colony of Philadelphia, and containing the first plan of Philadelphia, the earliest map of any English city in America. Thomas Holme (1624-95) learned surveying in Cromwell's army, but became a Quaker after the end of the Civil War, which brought him into William Penn's circle. When Penn's original surveyor for the colony died en route to America, Holme was invited by Penn to take his place as Surveyor-General in 1682. He compiled a map of the new colony and carefully recorded the names of those who had bought property, and drew a plan of how the streets of Philadelphia were to be laid out. This street map is one of the first examples of urban planning. In May 1687 Penn requested a copy of Holme's map be send to London for publication, to encourage further migration. The map was issued in two formats: as a six-sheet wall map engraved by Francis Lamb, of which only four example still exist (Burden 628); and this single-sheet version, engraved by John Harris and originally published by Philip Lea c.1688. Like the six-sheet version it featured the plan of Philadelphia prominently. BURDEN: 669, state ii of iv.
[Ref: 16279]    £37,500.00 ($49,313 • €42,600 rates)


ALLARD, Hugo. [The Eastern Seaboard with the 'Restitutio' view of New York]
Totius Neobelgii Nova et Accuratissima Tabula. Amsterdam: Reiner & Josua Ottens, c.1725. Original colour. 465 x 545mm. In pristine condition.
Hugo Allard's edition of the Jansson-Visscher map, updated with the 'Restitutio' view of New York, drawn during the short occupation by the Dutch in 1673. It shows the colony much enlarged since the English took it in 1664, with the defensive wall where Wall Street is now. Under Long Island the fleet of Vice Admiral Cornelius Evertsen, who took New York in 1673, is marked, BURDEN: 373, state 7 of 7.
[Ref: 18268]    £8,000.00 ($10,520 • €9,088 rates)


Records: 71 to 80 of 399
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