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Records: 71 to 80 of 127
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  LONDON 
 London Maps 

PHILIP, George & Son. [Detailed plan of London at the end of the 19th century]
Philips' New Library Map of London and its Environs. London & Liverpool, c.1892. Original colour. Dissected and laid on linen, as issued, total 1080 x 1460mm, folded into original box.
A large and impressive map of London extending to Mortlake in the west, clockwise to Hendon, Muswell Hill, Wanstead, Ilford, Chislehurst, Beckenham, Mitcham and Wimbledon. On the map Shaftesbury Avenue has been completed (1886) and the demolition of Millbank Prison has started (1892). HYDE 229.
[Ref: 17432]    £3,250.00 ($4,225 • €3,738 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Hampstead & St John's Wood from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map G Hampstead and St John's Wood (1900). [&] Map E. - Inner North West (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Two sheets conjoined, total 470 x 525mm. Binding folds flattened, keys placed at bottom margin, laid on linen.
Two sections (of twenty) of the 1900 edition of Booth's Poverty Map joined, showing Hampstead, St John's Wood, Primrose Hill, Kilburn, Kenish Town, Camden Town and Old St Pancras. All of Regent's Park is included. The keys give seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
This item is currently on reserve


BOOTH, Charles. [The West End from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map K West Central London (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 235 x 315mm.
A map of Soho, Bloomsbury, Fitzrovia Covent Garden, Mayfair and St James's, one section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. The key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 17328]    £550.00 ($715 • €633 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [North London from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map D. - North London (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour, backed on cloth. Sheet 385 x 435mm.
One section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Showing Barnsbury, Kentish Town, Kings Cross, Camden Town, Hoxton, Highbury, Holloway, and Tufnell Park. Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 17327]    £800.00 ($1,040 • €920 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Booth's survey of London's places of worship, schools and pubs]
London, 1899-1900. Map showing Places of Religious Worship, Public Elementary Schools, and Houses Licensed for the Sale of Intoxicating Drinks. London: MacMillan & Co, 1902. Wood engraving, printed in colours. Sheet 685 x 1010mm. Original folds flattened.
Charles Booth published three 'series' of 'Life and Labour of the People of London' between 1889 and 1902, with the famous 'Poverty Map' appearing in the first. This map was published in the extra 'Final Volume', in which Booth wrote his conclusions. It emphasises the proximity of beer houses, fully-licensed premises (i.e. for spirits also), restaurants and alcohol-selling grocers to schools, churches, chapels and synagogues. The huge number of such premises led Booth to conclude that the the Temperance Movement had failed.
[Ref: 17454]    £980.00 ($1,274 • €1,127 rates)


GILL, Leslie MacDonald. [A leaflet map of the London Underground]
Map of the UndergrounD Railways of London. London: Dangerfield Printing Co., 1923. Coloured printed folding map, 365 x 440mm. Tiny repairs at folds.
A larger format leaflet, published a decade before the introduction of the Beck 'electrical circuit' map. Leslie MacDonald Gill (1884-1947, known as Max), younger brother of Eric Gill, specialised in graphic design in the Arts and Crafts style. His most important commission was from the Imperial War Graves Commission, designing the script used on Commission headstones and war memorials, including the 'Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme'. His 'Wonderground Map of London', originally drawn as an advertising poster for London Electric Underground Railway Company in 1914, was such a success it is credited with saving the 'UndergrounD' advertising campaign.
[Ref: 16719]    £650.00 ($845 • €748 rates)


GILL, Leslie MacDonald. [A leaflet map of the London Underground]
Map of the UndergrounD Railways of London. London: Dangerfield Printing Co., 1925. Folding map, with card covers, 210 x 255mm.
A short-lived experiment in printing in black only, with no way of recognising the different lines! The card cover is titled 'How to Travel To and From Queen's Park, Kilburn Park, Maida Vale and Warwick Avenue Stations by London's UndergrounD', all stations on the Bakerloo Line. Leslie MacDonald Gill (1884-1947, known as Max), younger brother of Eric Gill, specialised in graphic design in the Arts and Crafts style. His most important commission was from the Imperial War Graves Commission, designing the script used on Commission headstones and war memorials, including the 'Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme'. His 'Wonderground Map of London', originally drawn as an advertising poster for London Electric Underground Railway Company in 1914, was such a success it is credited with saving the 'UndergrounD' advertising campaign.
[Ref: 16721]    £420.00 ($546 • €483 rates)


BECK, Henry C. [An early example of Beck's iconic map of the London Underground]
Railway Map. London Underground Transport. No 1. 1935. London: London Underground, 1935. Colour-printed map, 150 x 225mm, folded twice. Reverse slightly soiled.
The first 1935 issue of Beck's map of the London Underground, two years after its first appearance. The reverse shows a detail of the interchange stations in the central area with the names of the interchange stations within diamonds. See GARLAND: Mr Beck's Underground Map.
[Ref: 17518]    £420.00 ($546 • €483 rates)


BECK, Henry C. [Beck's iconic map of the London Underground]
Railway Map. London Underground Transport. No 1. 1938. London: London Underground, 1938. Colour-printed map, 150 x 225mm, folded twice.
A 1938 edition of Beck's map of the London Underground, five years after its first appearance. On the map the Central London line has now been renamed the Central line. The reverse shows a detail of the interchange stations in the central area with the names of the interchange stations within diamonds. See GARLAND: Mr Beck's Underground Map.
[Ref: 17490]    £380.00 ($494 • €437 rates)


BECK, Henry C. [A scarce 1949 'Quad Royal' poster map of the Underground by H.C. Beck]
London Transport Railways. London: Waterlow & Sons, 1949. Colour lithographic map. Sheet 1010 x 1265mm. Repaired tears, laid on archival paper.
A poster map of the London Underground published sixteen years after the introduction of Beck's iconic 'electric diagram' map of the Underground. According to Garland, Beck was particularly fond of this version because he was able 'at last to eradicate all those features with which he had been unwillingly saddled by others'. For example the Metropolitan Line is no longer the same green as the District Line, as it has been since 1935. The 'Inner Circle' has become the Circle Line and is now yellow for the first time. Proposed extensions are shown: on the Northern Line from Edware to Bushey Heath, Mill Hill East to Edgeware and Highgate to Alexandra Palace and Finsbury Park; on the Circle Line from Loughton to Ongar; and on the Bakerloo Line from Elephant & Castle to Camberwell. GARLAND: Mr Beck's Underground Map, 31, full-page illus; 'Beck considered this perhaps the best of all his versions of the Diagram'.
[Ref: 17460]    £4,500.00 ($5,850 • €5,175 rates)


Records: 71 to 80 of 127
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