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Records: 71 to 80 of 122
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  LONDON 
 London Maps 

BACON, George Washington. [Environs of London]
Bacon's Map of the Environs of London from the Latest Ordnance Surveys, Divided into Three Mile Squares & Circles London, 1879. Colour lithograph. 460 x 620mm. Chip to bottom margin
Detailed map of the environs of London, centred on Charing Cross and covering nine miles to the north and south and approximately ten and a half miles to the east and west. Text to the left and right with an index key to notable places.
[Ref: 18070]    £280.00 ($356 • €312 rates)


Booth, Charles. [The Isle of Dogs from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map A. - Isle of Dogs (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 265 x 190mm. Binding folds flattened, key re-attached at bottom.
One section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Most of this sheet is taken up with the commercial buildings, with docks, wharfs, warehouses, iron works, 'Manure works' and other factories, but residential streets line the roads of the peninsula. Although the key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'), there is no sign of the two highest classes. Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 16083]    £280.00 ($356 • €312 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Hampstead & St John's Wood from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map G Hampstead and St John's Wood (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 450 x 280mm. Binding folds flattened, key placed at top margin.
A map of Hampstead and St John's Wood, one section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Showing Hampstead, St John's Wood, Primrose Hill and Kilburn. The key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 16735]    £1,000.00 ($1,273 • €1,116 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Battersea from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map S. - Battersea (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 345 x 365mm. Binding folds flattened, key placed at top margin.
A map of Battersea, one section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Showing Batterea, Balham Lavender Hill, Battersea Rise, Nine Elms and part of Brixton. The key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 16734]    £800.00 ($1,018 • €893 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Fulham from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map O. - Fulham (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 295 x 335mm. Binding folds flattened, key placed at bottom margin., laid on linen.
A map of Fulham and western Chelsea, one section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Bounded by the Thames in the south, the northern extents are Hammersmith Bridge Road, the Talgarth Road, Philbeach Gardens, The Boltons and the World's End. The key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Although the colours of the map are predominantly those of comfort (with The Boltons and Fulham Palace the yellow of 'Wealthy'), there are roads lined with black: Grove Avenue and Langford Road, now both redeveloped, and Sladburn Street, just off the King's Road at the World's End. Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 16723]    £550.00 ($700 • €614 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Hampstead & St John's Wood from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map G Hampstead and St John's Wood (1900). [&] Map E. - Inner North West (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Two sheets conjoined, total 470 x 525mm. Binding folds flattened, keys placed at bottom margin, laid on linen.
Two sections (of twenty) of the 1900 edition of Booth's Poverty Map joined, showing Hampstead, St John's Wood, Primrose Hill, Kilburn, Kenish Town, Camden Town and Old St Pancras. All of Regent's Park is included. The keys give seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 17459]    £1,750.00 ($2,228 • €1,953 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [North London from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map D. - North London (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour, backed on cloth. Sheet 385 x 435mm.
One section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Showing Barnsbury, Kentish Town, Kings Cross, Camden Town, Hoxton, Highbury, Holloway, and Tufnell Park. Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 17327]    £800.00 ($1,018 • €893 rates)


COLLINGRIDGE, William Hill & Leonard. [The City of London at the beginning of the 20th century]
Collingridge's City of London Directory Map, Shewing the Latest Improvements and Alterations. London, 1906. Lithograph, printed in colours. Dissected and laid on waxed linen, total 740 x 1280mm. Some surface abrasion.
A detailed plan of the City, marking the parishes and the railways both above and below ground. HYDE: Printed Maps of Victorian London, 208, state 22.
[Ref: 14424]    £450.00 ($573 • €502 rates)


LONDON UNDERGROUND ELECTRIC RAILWAYS. [Early map of what was to become the 'London Underground']
London Underground Electric Railways Johnson, Riddle & Co., 1908. Colour lithograph. Sheet 305 x 425mm.
A map of the underground lines run by the Underground Electric Railways Company of London, founded in 1902 by the American financier Charles Yeakes: the 'Hampstead Tube', 'Piccadilly Tube', 'Bakerloo Tube' and 'District Railway', here all coloured black. By this time the UERL was in financial difficulties, having underestimed passenger numbers. Later the same year the other companies agreed to join the 'Underground' publicity campaign. The reverse is filled with illustrations advertising 'Dr Rasurel's Hygenic Wool & Peat Underclothing', including a man golfing in a Norfolk Jacket.
[Ref: 18004]    £600.00 ($764 • €670 rates)


METROPOLITAN RAILWAY. [Leaflet map of what was to become the 'London Underground' (1908-3)]
London Electric Railways. London: Johnson, Riddle & Co.?, c. December 1908. Colour lithograph. Sheet 225 x 270mm.
A paper map with the text on the reverse highlighting the Central London Line. A notice reads 'Passengers are specially requested to abstain from Spitting in the CARS and LIFTS, or on the Premises'.
[Ref: 18002]    £550.00 ($700 • €614 rates)


Records: 71 to 80 of 122
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