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Records: 71 to 80 of 320
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  LONDON 
 London Maps 

LE ROUGE, Georges-Louis. [Georgian plan of London]
Plan nouveau et correct des villes et fauxbourgs de Londres et Westminster et du bourg de Southwark avec la campagne adjacente, et les grands chemins nouvellement construits &c Paris: Le Rouge, c.1770. Coloured. 300 x 490mm.
Scarce plan of London and the suburbs with the adjacent countryside and the newly built highways.
[Ref: 18633]    £750.00 ($974 • €850 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [Knightsbridge from an important large-scale survey of London]
[Knightsbridge.] London: 1794. 565 x 525mm.
A plan of Knightsbridge from what Howgego describes as the 'largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century', on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. It shows Hyde Park and the Serpentine, with Knightsbridge, the Brompton Road and Sloane Street. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 14121]    £600.00 ($779 • €680 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [A detailed plan of Fitzrovia with a view of the 'New Road']
[Fitzrovia .] London: 1793-4. 565 x 525mm. Very fine condition.
Sheet 1B from Horwood's survey of London, on a scale of 26 inches to a mile, covering Fitzrovia, in an early state, with a separately-printed propect of the country north of 'The New Road from Paddington' (Euston Road), which was dropped from the completed map. The area mapped is from Tottenham Court Road west to Devonshire Place, marking Fitzroy Square (without the central garden in the completed map). There is little development north of the Euston Road, but of interest is 'Jews Harp House', a coffee house that was a hot-bed of Jacobin insurrection. William Blake refers to it and the farm shown nearby in his poem 'Jerusalem': 'The Jews-harp-house & the Green Man; / The Ponds here Boys to bathe delight: / The fields of Cows by Willans farm: Shine in Jerusalems pleasant sight'. Within twenty years both had disappeared as the area was developed as Regent's Park. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22, the 'largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century',
[Ref: 16924]    £750.00 ($974 • €850 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [Westminster and Lambeth from an important large-scale survey of London]
[Westminster & Lambeth.] London: 1799 Two sheets conjoined, total 570 x 1010mm. Some original outline colour. Top corners repaired with some fill.
Two sheets from a map which Howgego describes as the "largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century", on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. The western part of the map shows the eastern end of St James's Park, with part of Pall Mall, Charing Cross with the King's Mews, Westminster Abbey and Hall, Great Peter Street and what is now Smith Square. Across Westminster Bridge Lambeth is shown, with St George's Circus and King's Bench Prison. Further north the Thames riverside is filled with timber yards where the South Bank Centre now stands. Near Westminster Bridge is Astley's Theatre, dedicated to equestrian shows. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 12670]    £1,100.00 ($1,429 • €1,246 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [The City and Whitechapel from an important large-scale survey of London]
[The City and Whitechapel.] London: 1799. Two sheets conjoined, total 570 x 1010mm. Some original outline colour. Top corners repaired with some fill.
The City and Whitechapel from a map Howgego describes as the "largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century", on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. Among the landmarks are the Bank of England & the Royal Exchange, Guildhall, Moorfields and Tower Hill. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 12671]    £1,200.00 ($1,559 • €1,360 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [Walworth from an important large-scale survey of London]
[Walworth, with the Old Kent Road.] London: 1799. Two sheets conjoined, total 570 x 1010mm. Some original outline colour. Top corners repaired with some fill.
Walworth, in the Borough of Southwark, with Walworth Road, the Old Kent Road and Grange Road. At the time of publication Walworth Common was open land; now it is completely developed. Howgego describes Horwood's map as the "largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century", on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 12672]    £550.00 ($714 • €623 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [Marylebone & St Pancras from an important large-scale survey of London]
[Marylebone & St Pancras .] London: 1794-5. Two sheets conjoined, total 570 x 1010mm. Some original outline colour. Top corners repaired.
Marylebone & St Pancras from a map that Howgego describes as the "largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century", on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. 'The New Road from Paddington' (Euston Road) is shown from Tottenham Court Road west to Lisson Grove (birthplace of Eliza Doolittle in Shaw's 'Pygmalion). Also marked are Fitzroy Square, Warren Street, Harley Street, Baker Street and the Workhouse where the University of Westminster now stands. There is little development north of the Euston Road, but of interest is 'Jews Harp House', a coffee house that was a hot-bed of Jacobin insurrection. William Blake refers to it and the farm shown nearby in his poem 'Jerusalem': 'The Jews-harp-house & the Green Man; / The Ponds here Boys to bathe delight: / The fields of Cows by Willans farm: Shine in Jerusalems pleasant sight'. Within twenty years both had disappeared as the area was developed as Regent's Park. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 12668]    £900.00 ($1,169 • €1,020 rates)


STRATFORD, James. [London at the beginning of the 19th century]
London, extending from the Head of the Paddington Canal West, to the West India Docks East with the propsed Improvements between the Royal Exchange and Finsbury Square. London, 1806. Coloured. 300 x 530mm. Minor repair to left margin.
A plan of London showing from the Serpentine clockwise to Islington, the West India Docks and Lambeth, with an extensive key underneath. Engraved by Russell for Hughson's 'London, being an accurate history and description of the British metropolis'. HOWGEGO: 240.
[Ref: 15860]    £450.00 ($585 • €510 rates)


Anonymous. [Early 19th century plan of London]
Plan von London und Westminster mit der Borough von Southwark. Prague, 1810. 250 x 495mm.
A Czech plan of London, seemingly based on the Horwood map. The map reaches Knightsbridge in the west, Islington in the north, Stepney in the east and Newington in the south. Not listed in Howgego.
[Ref: 18257]    £425.00 ($552 • €482 rates)


BOWLER & TRIQUET. [A Georgian map of Tottenham]
A Map of the Parish of Tottenham in the County of Middlesex from an Actual Survey. London, 1818. Coloured. Sheet 405 x 580mm. Laid on linen as issued, binding folds flattened.
A map of Tottenham Parish, engraved by R.E. Bowler and E.G. Triquet for William Robinson's 'History and Antiquities of the Parish of Tottenham High Cross'. Besides marking the houses, the area of each field is measured, in acres, rods and perches. The site of the White Hart Lane stadium is still fields, on the corner of High Road and Marsh Lane (now renamed Park Lane.)
[Ref: 14422]    £450.00 ($585 • €510 rates)


Records: 71 to 80 of 320
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