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Records: 81 to 90 of 118
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  LONDON 
 London Maps 

WELLER, Edward. [A wall map of Victorian London]
London. London: 1861-62. Coloured. Nine sheets conjoined, total 1390 x 1880mm. Backed with linen.
A very large, detailed map of London, produced by Edward Weller for the "Daily Dispatch" between 1861-1862 and brought out in parts by the Dispatch, and later compiled amongst other maps into the "Dispatch Atlas" published in 1863. The map shows amongst other things, post district boundaries and post offices. It also marks the site of the International Exhibition of 1861, which is now occupied by the South Kensington museums. It also shows Waterloo Station (1848). the new Victoria Station (1860) and Brunel's original Hungerford Suspension Bridge, which was just about to be replaced with the railway bridge for Charing Cross Station. HYDE "Printed maps of Victorian London", No. 73 (1).
[Ref: 9702]    £2,800.00 ($3,710 • €3,153 rates)


STANFORD, Edward. [The environs of London, marking the railways]
Map of the Environs of London Reduced from the Ordnance Survey. London: Stanford, c.1865. Original colour. Dissected and laid on linen, as issued, total 605 x 830mm.
Detailed plan of the environs of London extending to Great Marlow in the west, clockwise to Aylesbury, Hatfield, Chelmsford, Chatham, Maidstone, Reigate and Guildford. At the centre London is marked with the Postal Districts introduced by Sir Rowland Hill, 1857-8. HYDE: 55.
[Ref: 17228]    £500.00 ($663 • €563 rates)


DAVIES, Benjamin Rees. [Map of the environs of London in Victorian times]
Davies's Map of the Environs of London. London, Edward Stanford, 1875. Original colour. Dissected and laid on linen, sheet 790 x 1155mm.
A large and detailed map, covering from Windsor in the west clockwise to Potter's Bar, Amersham, Brentwood, Dartford and Leatherhead. The map highlights the railway system that had expanded considerably in recent years. HYDE: 39.
[Ref: 14265]    £500.00 ($663 • €563 rates)


WYLD, James. [A large and fine wall map of London]
London and its Environs. London, c.1875. Coloured. Dissected & laid on linen as issued, 1090 x 1300mm.
A very large and detailed map of London in fine original colour, extending from Kew Bridge in the west, clockwise to Highgate, Leytonstone, Canning Town, Greenwich & Blackheath, Norwood and Richmond Park. The map is within a printed frame, pasted on, which contains the title and lists of parishes. HYDE: D & H 415.
[Ref: 13722]    £6,000.00 ($7,950 • €6,756 rates)


BACON, George Washington. [Plan of Marylebone at the beginning of the 20th century]
Plan of St Marylebone 1900. London: G.W. Bacon & Co., 1900. Coloured lithographic folding map, dissected and laid on linen, 545 x 725mm, in red cloth gilt covers. Covers worn, wear at folds, some pencil mss.
A map of the new Metropolitan Borough of Saint Marylebone, as created by the London Government Act 1899, covering from Oxford Street north to St John's Wood, with Regent's Park and Lord's Cricket Ground.
[Ref: 12410]    £400.00 ($530 • €450 rates)


Booth, Charles. [The Isle of Dogs from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map A. - Isle of Dogs (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 265 x 190mm. Binding folds flattened, key re-attached at bottom.
One section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Most of this sheet is taken up with the commercial buildings, with docks, wharfs, warehouses, iron works, 'Manure works' and other factories, but residential streets line the roads of the peninsula. Although the key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'), there is no sign of the two highest classes. Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 16083]    £280.00 ($371 • €315 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Hampstead & St John's Wood from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map G Hampstead and St John's Wood (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 450 x 280mm. Binding folds flattened, key placed at top margin.
A map of Hampstead and St John's Wood, one section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Showing Hampstead, St John's Wood, Primrose Hill and Kilburn. The key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 16735]    £1,000.00 ($1,325 • €1,126 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Battersea from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map S. - Battersea (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 345 x 365mm. Binding folds flattened, key placed at top margin.
A map of Battersea, one section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Showing Batterea, Balham Lavender Hill, Battersea Rise, Nine Elms and part of Brixton. The key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 16734]    £800.00 ($1,060 • €901 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Fulham from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map O. - Fulham (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 295 x 335mm. Binding folds flattened, key placed at bottom margin., laid on linen.
A map of Fulham and western Chelsea, one section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Bounded by the Thames in the south, the northern extents are Hammersmith Bridge Road, the Talgarth Road, Philbeach Gardens, The Boltons and the World's End. The key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Although the colours of the map are predominantly those of comfort (with The Boltons and Fulham Palace the yellow of 'Wealthy'), there are roads lined with black: Grove Avenue and Langford Road, now both redeveloped, and Sladburn Street, just off the King's Road at the World's End. Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 16723]    £550.00 ($729 • €619 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Hampstead & St John's Wood from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map G Hampstead and St John's Wood (1900). [&] Map E. - Inner North West (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Two sheets conjoined, total 470 x 525mm. Binding folds flattened, keys placed at bottom margin, laid on linen.
Two sections (of twenty) of the 1900 edition of Booth's Poverty Map joined, showing Hampstead, St John's Wood, Primrose Hill, Kilburn, Kenish Town, Camden Town and Old St Pancras. All of Regent's Park is included. The keys give seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 17459]    £1,750.00 ($2,319 • €1,971 rates)


Records: 81 to 90 of 118
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