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Records: 81 to 90 of 363
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  AMERICA 
 United States 

PHILLIPS, Richard. [One of the few maps to name the lost state of 'Franklinia']
United States in North America. London: R. Phillips, 1809. 410 x 340mm. Narrow margins on three sides, binding folds flattened.
An uncommon map of the United States, published to illustrate an English edition of the ' Travels of the Duke de la Rochefoucault Liancourt'. It is covered with details like the locations of Indian tribes, forts and former colomy boundaries, as well as marking the proposed state of 'Franklinia' and 'Morgania', the early name for Missouri.
[Ref: 16074]    £725.00 ($980 • €807 rates)


COLTON, J.H. [A two-sheet wall map of the United States]
Map of the United States of America, The British Provinces, Mexico, the West Indies and Central America, with part of New Granada and Venezuela. New York: J.H. Colton, 1853. Steel engraving with original hand colour. Two sheets conjoined, total 865 x 1075mm. A pristine example.
A brightly-coloured map of the United States surrounded by a decorative border of vines and grapes linking vignette scenes. Above the title is another vignette featuring a bald eagle in front of a port, with a locomotive and a paddle steamer. Two other insets show the North Atlantic and the trans-Panama railway. On the map Oregon Territory is still coloured in its pre-1853 entirety, prior to the creation of Washington Territory, although 'Washington' is written across the top half. Most of these large Colton maps were issued dissected and laid on linen, so to find an uncut example such as this is unusual.
[Ref: 17402]    £6,500.00 ($8,788 • €7,238 rates)


COLTON, J.H. [An unusual issue of Colton's map of the United States]
The United States of America 1854. New York:Colton, 1854. Original colour. Wood engraving, printed area 410 x 690mm. Small hole filled, folds reinforced on verso.
An unusual issue of Colton's map, published just as the Gadsden Purchase was being ratified, omitting the territoridal gains to Arizona and Texas, bought to facilitate the planned southern transcontinental railroad. Also of interest are the routes of explorers such as Fremont, Kearny and Marcy, as well as the Santa Fé trail.
[Ref: 16195]    £850.00 ($1,149 • €946 rates)


NOGUERA, C. [An uncommon Spanish sea chart of the Eastern Seaboard]
Carta Esferica de las Costas Orientales de los Estados Orientales en la America Setentrional desde el Rio de San Juan hasta Nueva York. Madrid: Direccion de Hidrografia, 1826-c.1863. Touches of original colour. 640 x 950mm.
A Spanish chart of the Eastern Seaboard of the United States from Long Island south to the Georgia/Florida border, with Chesapeake Bay shown in detail. Bermuda is shown bottom right. The lighthouses marked in colour.
[Ref: 11858]    £1,700.00 ($2,298 • €1,893 rates)


LLOYD, James T. [Map of the American railways at the outbreak of the Civil War]
Lloyd's American Railroad Map, Showing the Whole Seat of War. New York & London, J.T. Lloyd, c.1861. Wood-engraved folding map with original colour, dissected and laid on linen in four sections, total 990 x 1280mm, folded into marbled slipcase. Paper lightly toned, a small amount of worming, some wear.
A large map of the United States railway system east of the Mississippi, on a scale of thirty miles to an inch, with insets of the railways of Texas and Pensacola Harbour. This is an early issue, including information about the Southern railroads, removed from latter examples. Of interest is the advert for 'Fowler and Wells', the famous phrenologists in New York.
[Ref: 12385]    £1,800.00 ($2,434 • €2,004 rates)


STANFORD, Edward. [Folding wall map of the United States, in fine colour]
Stanford's Map of the United States and part of the Dominion of Canada. London, Stanford, 1874. Original colour. Dissected and laid on linen as issed, total 940 x 1540mm, with publisher's slipcase Paper lightly toned, some wear.
A large and colourful antique map of the United States, with the railways marked in red. An inset contains Nova Scotia and Newfoundland.
[Ref: 12386]    £1,250.00 ($1,690 • €1,392 rates)


 Eastern Seaboard 

HONDIUS, Henricus. [A classic early map of Virginia]
Nova Virginiæ Tabula. Amsterdam: Jan Jansson, 1639, French text. Coloured. 385 x 495mm.
First published in 1630, this map is derived from John Smith's map of Virginia via the version engraved by Jodocus Hondius in 1618 (purchased and used extensively by Blaeu). However on this new version the Indian in the title cartouche faces Chesapeake Bay. The exact extents of Virginia are hard to define as they go inland into unexplored territory. BURDEN: 228.
[Ref: 17378]    £1,800.00 ($2,434 • €2,004 rates)


BLAEU, Willem Janszoon. [Virginia & Florida]
Virginiæ partis australis, et Floridæ partis orientalis, interjacecentiumq. regionum Nova Descriptio. Amsterdam, 1640, Latin text. Original colour. 390 x 505mm. Minor marginal repairs well outside the printed area.
Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia and northern Florida, with the English and French Royal Arms marking their areas of influence. Although much of the information dates back to Le Moyne (1565) and White (1590) Blaeu has reshaped the coastline and added a few new details, for example Jamestown and the Irish colony at Newport News on Chesapeake Bay. It has been claimed that to the left of the French armorial is a depiction of Niagra Falls, based on Indian hearsay and so well out of place. CUMMING: The South-East in Early Maps 41 - 'the most correct map of this area yet to appear'; KOEMAN: Bl 22.
[Ref: 10145]    £1,350.00 ($1,825 • €1,503 rates)


BLAEU, Johannes. [The earliest obtainable view of New York City]
Nieuw Amsterdam op t Eylant Manhattans. Amsterdam, c.1650. Etching, printed border 75 x 310mm. Corner of left bottom margin repaired, not affecting printed area; otherwise a very fine example.
A rare and important early prospect of 'New Amsterdam', only the second view to be published and now the earliest available to the collector. It shows the Dutch colony at a time of crisis, when the Board of Nine sent a petition to the council of the Dutch West India Company complaining about conditions and mismanagement of the colony's affairs by the Director-General Peter Stuyvesant. Blaeu published this view not in one of his grand atlases but as a loose print, printed anonymously to accompany a political pamphlet, 'Vertoogh van Nieu-Neder-Land', which drew public attention to the plight of the New Amsterdam colonists under Stuyvesant. The colonists had sent Adriaen van der Donck to Amsterdam in 1649 to petition the Council with a written 'Remonstrance of the Commonality of New Netherland', asking for Stuyvesant to be recalled. It included this view of New Amsterdam to show the conditions in the small settlement, with only ten points worthy of inclusion in the key. These include the fort, windmill, flagpole (to guide ships to port), church, Company's Warehouse and, to emphasise the brutality of life there, the prison and gibbet complete with hanging body. The unlisted wooden 'crane' in the centre is a fire-basket signal pole for signalling at night. The 'Remonstrance' also included a map of the region showing how the colony was in danger of being overwhelmed by the English and calling for more aid. Van der Donck's map was copied and published by Jan Jansson (as 'Nova Belgii...', 1650); it and Blaeu's view were both originally issued anonymously because of the political implications of supporting a near-revolt in the colonies. Despite the support of the two publishers the 'Remonstrance' was ignored: Stuyvesant remained Director General until 1664, with a regime noted for its religious intolerance. In August that year the colony was taken by the English with only 450 men. A feature of Blaeu's etching is that it lacks a plate mark, having been one of several views printed from one printing plate and cut into separate sheets for issue. It soon became the standard view of New Amsterdam: shortly afterwards Nicolaes Visscher published a corrected version of Jansson's map and added the prospect in the bottom right corner and as he was the first publisher to admit to his work the 'New Amsterdam' became known as the Visscher view. In 1991 a pen, ink and watercolour sketch was uncovered in the Albertina Collection of the Austrian National Gallery, which is believed to be the prototype. DE KONING: From Van der Donck to Visscher (Mercator's World Vol 5, no 4, 2000).
[Ref: 15516]    £10,000.00 ($13,520 • €11,135 rates)


SCHENK, Pieter. [An early view of New York]
Nieu Amsterdam, een stedeken in Noord Amerikaes Nieu Hollant, op het eilant Manhattan: Namaels Nieu Jork Genaemt, to en het geraekte in't gebiet der Engleschen. Amsterdam, 1702. Old colour. 225 x 275mm.
A Dutch view of New York, based on the ''Restitutio'' view of 1673, when the Dutch briefly reclaimed the city. By the time this view was printed, in Schenk's ''Hecatompolis'' (Book of Town Views), New York was firmly back in British hands, but Schenk has added a large ship with a Dutch standard to reinforce their aspirations to regain control.
[Ref: 17630]    £4,250.00 ($5,746 • €4,732 rates)


Records: 81 to 90 of 363
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