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Records: 81 to 90 of 357
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  BRITISH ISLES 
 English Counties 

BRAUN, Georg & HOGENBERG, Frans. [Early views of Windsor & Oxford]
Oxonium nobile Anglie oppidum...; Vindesorium celeberrimum Anglie castrum... Cologne, 1575. Coloured. 365 x 490mm.
Prospects of Windsor Castle and Oxford after Joris Hofnagle, published for the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, the first series of printed town plans.
[Ref: 16784]    £750.00 ($941 • €866 rates)


SAXTON, Christopher. [The first printed map of the county of Devon]
Devoniae Comitat, Rerumquae omnium in eodem memorabilium recens, vers pticularisq. Descriptio. London, 1575-c.1579. Original colour lightly refreshed. 400 x 450mm. Narrow top margin, minor repairs, laid on linen. A fine impression.
A rare example of the first publshed state of Saxton's map of Devon, engraved in 1575 by Remigius Hogenburg (brother of the more famous Frans Hogenberg) for Saxton's county atlas of 1579. The arms above the title are those of Thomas Seckford (1515 -87), who commissioned Saxton's survey, with those of Queen Elizabeth I top left. On the map towns, rivers and hills are marked, but it was not until nearly a century later that roads were routinely shown on county maps. Saxton's copperplates had a long career: after being eclipsed by John Speed's atlas of 1611, the plates were re-engraved and re-issued in 1642 by William Web. Although most of the other plates were still being printed as late as 1770, the Devon plate had either been lost or destroyed by the 1689 Lea edition. BATTEN: 1.
[Ref: 15840]    £3,800.00 ($4,769 • €4,389 rates)


BRAUN, Georg & HOGENBERG, Frans. [A 16th century plan of Norwich]
Nordovicum, Angliae Civitas. Cologne, 1581-. Old colour. 325 x 440mm.
The earliest printed map of Norwich, a 'map-view' with the major buildings, in this case the colleges, shown in profile, with no consideration for perspective. Published in the 'Civitates Orbis Terrarum', the first series of printed town plans. KOEMAN: B&H 2.
[Ref: 16817]    £700.00 ($879 • €809 rates)


DRAYTON, Michael. [Map of Shropshire from Drayton's fantastical 'Poly-Olbion']
[The Parte of Shropshre one the West of Severne.] London, 1612. 255 x 330mm. Narrow bottom margin.
A very decorative map of Shropshire, ignoring political boundaries and instead focusing on natural features, with hills and rivers populated by allegorical figures. Only major towns are marked. Shrewsbury, Bridgnorth and Ludlow are shown. Michael Drayton (1563-1631), a prominent poet, is believed to have started work on his 'Poly-Olbion' in 1598. This epic topographical poem, divided into thirty songs written in alexandrine couplets, ran to nearly 15,000 lines of verse. Each song described one, two or three counties, describing their topography, traditions and histories. The First Part was published in 1612, with eighteen maps probably engraved by William Hole (who signed the frontispiece). Drayton had been a favourite of Queen Elizabeth's court, but was not so popular with James I. Perhaps to rectify this the 'Poly-Olbion' was dedicated to Henry, Prince of Wales, but Henry died in 1612, the year of publication. The work did not sell well, and it was not until 1622 that Drayton could find a publisher for the second part, which contained ten more maps. Drayton intended to compose a further part to cover Scotland, but no part of this work is known to have survived. Despite these setbacks Drayton was still prominent enough to be buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey when he died in 1631. It was only posthumously that the Poly-Olbion became a literary classic.
[Ref: 14042]    £360.00 ($452 • €416 rates)


DRAYTON, Michael. [Map of Middlesex and Hertfordshire from Drayton's fantastical 'Poly-Olbion']
[Midle Sex; Hartford Shyre.] London, 1612. 255 x 335mm.
A very decorative map of Middlesex and Hertfordshire, ignoring political boundaries and instead focusing on natural features, with hills and rivers populated by allegorical figures. Only major towns are marked, including Hartford, St Albans, Brent, Enfield, Highgate, Hampstead and the River Colne. 'Watling Street, The first great way of England' is also marked. Michael Drayton (1563-1631), a prominent poet, is believed to have started work on his 'Poly-Olbion' in 1598. This epic topographical poem, divided into thirty songs written in alexandrine couplets, ran to nearly 15,000 lines of verse. Each song described one, two or three counties, describing their topography, traditions and histories. The First Part was published in 1612, with eighteen maps probably engraved by William Hole (who signed the frontispiece). Drayton had been a favourite of Queen Elizabeth's court, but was not so popular with James I. Perhaps to rectify this the 'Poly-Olbion' was dedicated to Henry, Prince of Wales, but Henry died in 1612, the year of publication. The work did not sell well, and it was not until 1622 that Drayton could find a publisher for the second part, which contained ten more maps. Drayton intended to compose a further part to cover Scotland, but no part of this work is known to have survived. Despite these setbacks Drayton was still prominent enough to be buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey when he died in 1631. It was only posthumously that the Poly-Olbion became a literary classic.
[Ref: 14043]    £600.00 ($753 • €693 rates)


DRAYTON, Michael. [Map of Surrey and Sussex from Drayton's fantastical 'Poly-Olbion']
[Svrrey; London; Svssex.] London, 1612. 255 x 330mm.
A very decorative map of Surrey and Sussex, ignoring political boundaries and instead focusing on natural features, with hills and rivers populated by allegorical figures. Major towns are marked. London; Westminster; Hampton Court; Richmond; Arundel; Chichester; Hastings and part of the Weald are shown as well as the Rivers Thames, Arun; Rother and Mole. Michael Drayton (1563-1631), a prominent poet, is believed to have started work on his 'Poly-Olbion' in 1598. This epic topographical poem, divided into thirty songs written in alexandrine couplets, ran to nearly 15,000 lines of verse. Each song described one, two or three counties, describing their topography, traditions and histories. The First Part was published in 1612, with eighteen maps probably engraved by William Hole (who signed the frontispiece). Drayton had been a favourite of Queen Elizabeth's court, but was not so popular with James I. Perhaps to rectify this the 'Poly-Olbion' was dedicated to Henry, Prince of Wales, but Henry died in 1612, the year of publication. The work did not sell well, and it was not until 1622 that Drayton could find a publisher for the second part, which contained ten more maps. Drayton intended to compose a further part to cover Scotland, but no part of this work is known to have survived. Despite these setbacks Drayton was still prominent enough to be buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey when he died in 1631. It was only posthumously that the Poly-Olbion became a literary classic.
[Ref: 14044]    £600.00 ($753 • €693 rates)


DRAYTON, Michael. [Map of Herefordshire, with parts of Gloucestershire & Worcestershire from Drayton's fantastical 'Poly-Olbion']
[Hereford Shyre; Parte of Glocester Shyre; Parte of Worcester Shyre.] London, 1612. 260 x 340mm.
A very decorative map of the upper Severn River, ignoring political boundaries and instead focusing on natural features, with hills and rivers populated by allegorical figures, with a shepherd on the Malvern Hills, a huntress for the Forest of Dean and a nymph for the Severn. Only major towns are marked, for example Hereford. Michael Drayton (1563-1631), a prominent poet, is believed to have started work on his 'Poly-Olbion' in 1598. This epic topographical poem, divided into thirty songs written in alexandrine couplets, ran to nearly 15,000 lines of verse. Each song described one, two or three counties, describing their topography, traditions and histories. The First Part was published in 1612, with eighteen maps probably engraved by William Hole (who signed the frontispiece). Drayton had been a favourite of Queen Elizabeth's court, but was not so popular with James I. Perhaps to rectify this the 'Poly-Olbion' was dedicated to Henry, Prince of Wales, but Henry died in 1612, the year of publication. The work did not sell well, and it was not until 1622 that Drayton could find a publisher for the second part, which contained ten more maps. Drayton intended to compose a further part to cover Scotland, but no part of this work is known to have survived. Despite these setbacks Drayton was still prominent enough to be buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey when he died in 1631. It was only posthumously that the Poly-Olbion became a literary classic.
[Ref: 14045]    £400.00 ($502 • €462 rates)


DRAYTON, Michael. [Map of Cheshire from Drayton's fantastical 'Poly-Olbion']
[Ches Shyre.] London, 1612. 255 x 330mm.
A very decorative map of Cheshire, ignoring political boundaries and instead focusing on natural features, with hills and rivers populated by allegorical figures. Only major towns are marked including Chester, Nantwich and Nantwich. Part of the Wirrall and the River Mersey are also shown. Michael Drayton (1563-1631), a prominent poet, is believed to have started work on his 'Poly-Olbion' in 1598. This epic topographical poem, divided into thirty songs written in alexandrine couplets, ran to nearly 15,000 lines of verse. Each song described one, two or three counties, describing their topography, traditions and histories. The First Part was published in 1612, with eighteen maps probably engraved by William Hole (who signed the frontispiece). Drayton had been a favourite of Queen Elizabeth's court, but was not so popular with James I. Perhaps to rectify this the 'Poly-Olbion' was dedicated to Henry, Prince of Wales, but Henry died in 1612, the year of publication. The work did not sell well, and it was not until 1622 that Drayton could find a publisher for the second part, which contained ten more maps. Drayton intended to compose a further part to cover Scotland, but no part of this work is known to have survived. Despite these setbacks Drayton was still prominent enough to be buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey when he died in 1631. It was only posthumously that the Poly-Olbion became a literary classic.
[Ref: 14046]    £400.00 ($502 • €462 rates)


DRAYTON, Michael. [Map of Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Berkshire from Drayton's fantastical 'Poly-Olbion']
[Oxford Shyre; Bvckingham Shyre; Barck Shyre.] London, 1612. 255 x 330mm.
A very decorative map of Oxfordshire; Buckinghamshire and Berkshire, ignoring political boundaries and instead focusing on natural features, with hills and rivers populated by allegorical figures. Only major towns are marked. The Chilterns; The Vale of White Horse; Windrush; Oxford and Thame are all shown. Michael Drayton (1563-1631), a prominent poet, is believed to have started work on his 'Poly-Olbion' in 1598. This epic topographical poem, divided into thirty songs written in alexandrine couplets, ran to nearly 15,000 lines of verse. Each song described one, two or three counties, describing their topography, traditions and histories. The First Part was published in 1612, with eighteen maps probably engraved by William Hole (who signed the frontispiece). Drayton had been a favourite of Queen Elizabeth's court, but was not so popular with James I. Perhaps to rectify this the 'Poly-Olbion' was dedicated to Henry, Prince of Wales, but Henry died in 1612, the year of publication. The work did not sell well, and it was not until 1622 that Drayton could find a publisher for the second part, which contained ten more maps. Drayton intended to compose a further part to cover Scotland, but no part of this work is known to have survived. Despite these setbacks Drayton was still prominent enough to be buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey when he died in 1631. It was only posthumously that the Poly-Olbion became a literary classic.
[Ref: 14048]    £480.00 ($602 • €554 rates)


SPEED, John. [The First Edition of Speed's map of Lincolnshire]
The Countie and Citie of Lyncolne Described with the Armes of Them That Have Bene Earles Thereof since the Conquest. London: Sudbury & Humble, 1612. Coloured. 385 x 505mm. Very fine impression, printed on heavy paper.
Engraved by Jodocus Hondius, this is one of the most decorative maps of the county, with a town plan of Lincoln, a strapwork title cartouche with a royal crest and a compass rose, a scale cartouche with compass and putti, armorials and a stylised battle. Published in the first edition of Speed's county atlas, the 'Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain' it has an English text history of the county on the reverse.
[Ref: 15702]    £1,200.00 ($1,506 • €1,386 rates)


Records: 81 to 90 of 357
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