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Records: 91 to 100 of 118
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  LONDON 
 London Maps 

BOOTH, Charles. [The West End from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map K West Central London (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 235 x 315mm.
A map of Soho, Bloomsbury, Fitzrovia Covent Garden, Mayfair and St James's, one section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. The key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 17328]    £550.00 ($732 • €620 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [North London from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map D. - North London (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour, backed on cloth. Sheet 385 x 435mm.
One section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Showing Barnsbury, Kentish Town, Kings Cross, Camden Town, Hoxton, Highbury, Holloway, and Tufnell Park. Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 17327]    £800.00 ($1,064 • €902 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Booth's survey of London's places of worship, schools and pubs]
London, 1899-1900. Map showing Places of Religious Worship, Public Elementary Schools, and Houses Licensed for the Sale of Intoxicating Drinks. London: MacMillan & Co, 1902. Wood engraving, printed in colours. Sheet 685 x 1010mm. Original folds flattened.
Charles Booth published three 'series' of 'Life and Labour of the People of London' between 1889 and 1902, with the famous 'Poverty Map' appearing in the first. This map was published in the extra 'Final Volume', in which Booth wrote his conclusions. It emphasises the proximity of beer houses, fully-licensed premises (i.e. for spirits also), restaurants and alcohol-selling grocers to schools, churches, chapels and synagogues. The huge number of such premises led Booth to conclude that the the Temperance Movement had failed.
[Ref: 17454]    £980.00 ($1,303 • €1,105 rates)


Anonymous. [An early 'Underground' map]
London UndergrounD Railways. Johnson, Riddle & Co., 1910. Wood engraving, printed in colours. Sheet 220 x 270mm. Wear to folds reinforced.
An early paper folding map of the Underground, published only two years after the first. This version has the background road layout removed and the key of lines moved from top left to bottom right. The mainline stations are numbered 1-13 in black blocks; other attractions are numbered 14-42 in blue (listed on the reverse), including the Japanese-British Exhibiton at White City in 1910. The proposed extension of the Central Line (here coloured blue) from Bank to Liverpool Street is marked.
[Ref: 17437]    £400.00 ($532 • €451 rates)


HORNE & Co. [A plan of Crystal Palace for the sale by auction of 1911]
Plan of Crystal Palace, Sydenham. For Sale by Auction by Howard Frank, of Messrs. Knight, Frank & Rutley, and J. Roy Lancaster of |Messrs. Horne & Co. London: Knight, Frank & Rutley, 1911. Tinted lithograph, 1010 x 1270mm. Laid on linen, original binding folds.
A large plan of Crystal Palace, adapted from the Ordnance Survey by the surveyors Horne & Co, and lithographed by Martin, Hood & Larkin. It was published in the auction catalogue for the auction sale of Crystal Palace in 1911, and details the grounds and the buildings in the immediate surroundings, including the railways stations and fire station. It shows the site of 'Sir Hiram Maxim's Captive Flying Machines', a fairground ride designed by the inventor of tre Maxim machine gun. The Crystal Palace was built in Hyde Park as a temporary building to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. Such was its popularity that it was re-erected in modified form at a permanent home in Sydenham in 1852, with two new railway stations to service it. Despite many successful exhibitions the owners went bankrupt in 1909; an announcement in The Times on 11th September 1911 set the date of the sale as 28th November 1911. However the auctioneer, Howard Frank, started a campaign to get the park saved for the nation. He has a luxurious brochure produced, containing fifty-two pages of photographs and engravings and sixty-four pages of text. It weighed approximately 3¼lb (without this map which was in a separate cover) and measured 16½in by 11in. The Lord Mayor of London, Sir Thomas Strong, called a meeting at the Mansion House for 23 October, for ‘all public bodies and persons interested in the acquisition of the Crystal Palace and its grounds for the use of the public forever’. The Mayor of Hampstead, William Woodward, wrote a letter to The Times, worried that the grounds were in danger of being given over to ‘football matches and other attractions for vulgar mobs’. Fortunately Robert Windsor-Clive, Lord Plymouth and Lord Lieutenant of Glamorgan, came forward with a deposit of £20,000 and, after reaching an agreement with the Court of Chancery, the rest of the sale price of 210,000. On the 9th November The Times ran a headline 'THE CRYSTAL PALACE SAVED'; by 1913 a fund started by the Lord Mayor was used to buy the park from Lord Plymouth.
[Ref: 16884]    £1,250.00 ($1,663 • €1,410 rates)


Anonymous. [A pre-Beck poster of London's Underground]
Underground Map of London. London: Waterlow & Sons, 1919. Colour lithographic map. Sheet 1000 x 1260mm. Minor repairs at folds, a little creasing, laid on canvas.
A quad royal poster of the Underground, dated '31-12-19', well over a decade before the revolutionary Beck design. Despite still being owned by different companies, all the lines are printed in red over an outline map of the road network. Although more geographically correct than Beck's map, the centre of London is on a larger scale than the outskirts in order to separate the stations enough for clear naming.
[Ref: 17924]    £3,250.00 ($4,323 • €3,666 rates)


GILL, Leslie MacDonald. [A quad royal pictorial map of London's Underground]
In The Heat Of The Summer You Will Find Me Cool In The Cold Of The Winter Find Me Warm Come Down Underground You've Bought Your Ticket? Your Health Man I'm Thinking No Longer 'Twill Stick It For Cheapness Celerity What Else Can Compare You Are Fed Up Above Feed Below On Our Fare'. London: Underground Electric Railways Company of London, 1922. 1015 x 1270mm. Some wear.
A map of Central London showing the Underground stations, drawn by Leslie MacDonald Gill, in the style of his famous 'Wonderground' map of 1914, but with new details. It does not extend as far north or south, but instead has nine armorials (the eight principal London boroughs and a ninth for a rabbit, returning to the Alice theme) and a decorative scroll containing the title. Bottom right is his signature and a further text: 'Will the tired traveller wearisomely realise that this map is meticulously accurate (with exceptions), that it has been punctiliously delineated to the scale of six inches to the mile and that its merry quips are well meant even when unintelligible'. Leslie MacDonald Gill (1884-1947), younger brother of Eric Gill, specialised in graphic design in the Arts and Crafts style. His most important commission was from the Imperial War Graves Commission, designing the script used on Commission headstones and war memorials, including the 'Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme'. He produced a number of maps, two of which appeared in the British Museum exhibition 'Magnificent Maps in 2010: 'The Wonderground Map of London' (1914) & 'Tea Revives the World' (1940).
[Ref: 16850]    £4,500.00 ($5,985 • €5,076 rates)


GILL, Leslie MacDonald. [Map of London's Underground as run by separate companies]
London's UndergrounD. Map of the Electric Railways of London. London: Dangerfield Printing Company for Electric Railway House, 1922. 280 x 340mm.
A map of the London underground rail network, marked '1-3-22' on reverse, so published over a decade before the operating companies were amalgamated as 'London Transport'. It shows the stations with more geographic accuracy than the iconic design of Henry C. Beck of 1933. The style of the map is influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement: the script used for the station names is particularly striking. Leslie MacDonald Gill (1884-1947), younger brother of Eric Gill, specialised in graphic design in the Arts and Crafts style. His most important commission was from the Imperial War Graves Commission, designing the script used on Commission headstones and war memorials, including the 'Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme'. He produced a number of maps, two of which appeared in the British Museum exhibition 'Magnificent Maps in 2010: 'The Wonderground Map of London' (1914) & 'Tea Revives the World' (1940).
[Ref: 17493]    £550.00 ($732 • €620 rates)


GILL, Leslie MacDonald. [A leaflet map of the London Underground]
Map of the UndergrounD Railways of London. London: Dangerfield Printing Co., 1923. Coloured printed folding map, 365 x 440mm. Tiny repairs at folds.
A larger format leaflet, published a decade before the introduction of the Beck 'electrical circuit' map. Leslie MacDonald Gill (1884-1947, known as Max), younger brother of Eric Gill, specialised in graphic design in the Arts and Crafts style. His most important commission was from the Imperial War Graves Commission, designing the script used on Commission headstones and war memorials, including the 'Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme'. His 'Wonderground Map of London', originally drawn as an advertising poster for London Electric Underground Railway Company in 1914, was such a success it is credited with saving the 'UndergrounD' advertising campaign.
[Ref: 16719]    £650.00 ($865 • €733 rates)


NORTH, Stanley Kennedy. [Poster map of an exhibition at Wembley Park]
British Empire Exhibition 1924. Wembley Park. April-October Its Situation Described In Relation to the Railways of London. Done by Kennedy North 1923. London: Dobson, Molle & Co. for the British Empire Exhibition, 1924. Chromolithographic map, with half-tones on reverse. Sheet 515 x 760mm. Minor restoration to original folds.
A pictorial map of the layout of the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley Park in 1924, a swansong for the Empire as it was morphing into the British Commonwealth. It was for this exhibition that the original Wembley Stadium was built and opened the previous year. The oval is clearly visible, underneath two large areas marked 'Industry' and 'Engineering' and large pavilions for Australia, India & Canada, and smaller ones for other nations, including New Zealand, East Africa, Malay, Burma, Hong Kong & Malta. Underneath is a diagramatic map of the rail links to Wembley via the lines that are now London Underground, with a circular 'Circle Line' surrounding a silhouette of Nelson's Column against the London skyline. On the reverse are guides to the pavilions, with a note 'With the Compliments of the Sheffield Daily Telegraph', showing this printing was for the Yorkshire region. The mapmaker, Stanley Kennedy North (1887-1942), has drawn upon a number of cartographic influences, including strapwork cartouches reminicent of the first county maps by Christopher Saxton, and the arts and crafts style of the maps of his contempoary Leslie MacDonald Gill (1884-1947). North later turned to restoring paintings, becoming 'Keeper of the King's Pictures', a semi-formal role later filled by Soviet spy Sir Anthony Blunt.
[Ref: 16161]    £400.00 ($532 • €451 rates)


Records: 91 to 100 of 118
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