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Records: 91 to 100 of 119
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  LONDON 
 London Maps 

WYLD, James. [A large and fine wall map of London]
London and its Environs. London, c.1875. Coloured. Dissected & laid on linen as issued, 1090 x 1300mm. With publisher's slipcase.
A very large and detailed map of London in fine original colour, extending from Kew Bridge in the west, clockwise to Highgate, Leytonstone, Canning Town, Greenwich & Blackheath, Norwood and Richmond Park. The map is within a printed frame, pasted on, which contains the title and lists of parishes. HYDE: D & H 415.
[Ref: 13722]    £4,000.00 ($5,000 • €4,600 rates)


STANFORD, Edward. [Folding map of the environs of London in the late 19th century]
A Map of the Environs of London Extending Twenty five Miles fr. the Metropolis. London, Stanford, c.1885. Original colour. Dissected and laid on linen as issued, total 940 x 980mm. Some old ink mss. marking toll booths and telegraphs in Surrey.
A detailed map of the environs of London, reaching Guildford in the bottom left, clockwise to Windsor, Berkhampstead, Ware, Hatfield, Chelmsford, Gravesend, Tunbridge, Reigate & Dorking. HYDE: Maps of Victorian London, D&H 299, originally published by Cruchley.
[Ref: 13197]    £400.00 ($500 • €460 rates)


BACON, George Washington. [Plan of Marylebone at the beginning of the 20th century]
Plan of St Marylebone 1900. London: G.W. Bacon & Co., 1900. Coloured lithographic folding map, dissected and laid on linen, 545 x 725mm, in red cloth gilt covers. Covers worn, wear at folds, some pencil mss.
A map of the new Metropolitan Borough of Saint Marylebone, as created by the London Government Act 1899, covering from Oxford Street north to St John's Wood, with Regent's Park and Lord's Cricket Ground.
[Ref: 12410]    £400.00 ($500 • €460 rates)


Booth, Charles. [The Isle of Dogs from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map A. - Isle of Dogs (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 265 x 190mm. Binding folds flattened, key re-attached at bottom.
One section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Most of this sheet is taken up with the commercial buildings, with docks, wharfs, warehouses, iron works, 'Manure works' and other factories, but residential streets line the roads of the peninsula. Although the key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'), there is no sign of the two highest classes. Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 16083]    £280.00 ($350 • €322 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Hampstead & St John's Wood from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map G Hampstead and St John's Wood (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 450 x 280mm. Binding folds flattened, key placed at top margin.
A map of Hampstead and St John's Wood, one section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Showing Hampstead, St John's Wood, Primrose Hill and Kilburn. The key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 16735]    £1,000.00 ($1,250 • €1,150 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Battersea from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map S. - Battersea (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 345 x 365mm. Binding folds flattened, key placed at top margin.
A map of Battersea, one section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Showing Batterea, Balham Lavender Hill, Battersea Rise, Nine Elms and part of Brixton. The key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 16734]    £800.00 ($1,000 • €920 rates)


BOOTH, Charles. [Fulham from Booth's Poverty Map of London]
Map O. - Fulham (1900). London, 1900. Lithographic map with original hand colour. Sheet 295 x 335mm. Binding folds flattened, key placed at bottom margin., laid on linen.
A map of Fulham and western Chelsea, one section (of twenty) of an extended version of the incredibly influential Poverty Map, originally published in Charles Booth's 'Life and Labour of the People in London', a founding text of British sociology. Bounded by the Thames in the south, the northern extents are Hammersmith Bridge Road, the Talgarth Road, Philbeach Gardens, The Boltons and the World's End. The key gives seven colour codes for the degree of wealth of the inhabitants (ranging from black - 'Lowest class', through shades of blue and purple - 'Poor', 'Mixed', 'Fairly Comfortable', to red - 'Well to do' and yellow - 'Wealthy'). Although the colours of the map are predominantly those of comfort (with The Boltons and Fulham Palace the yellow of 'Wealthy'), there are roads lined with black: Grove Avenue and Langford Road, now both redeveloped, and Sladburn Street, just off the King's Road at the World's End. Booth (1840-1916), owner of the Booth Shipping Line, acted in response to an 1886 Pall Mall Gazette article that claimed that 25% of Londoners lived in poverty. Booth regarded this figure as wildly exaggerated, so recruited a team of volunteer researchers to compile an analysis of social conditions based on field visits and interviews with local police, clergy and employers. The first volume of 'Life and Labour' (1889), covering the East End, showed that 35% lived in poverty. The second series, covering the rest of the city (1891) showed that no less than 30 per cent of the city's total population could be classed as poor. See HYDE: Victorian Maps of London, 252.
[Ref: 16723]    £550.00 ($688 • €633 rates)


Anonymous. [An early 'Underground' map]
London UndergrounD Railways. Johnson, Riddle & Co., 1910. Wood engraving, printed in colours. Sheet 220 x 270mm. Wear to folds reinforced.
An early folding pocket map of the Underground, published only two years after the first. This version has the background road layout removed and the key of lines moved from top left to bottom right. The mainline stations are numbered 1-13 in black blocks; other attractions are numbered 14-42 in blue (listed on the reverse), including the Japanese-British Exhibiton at White City in 1910. The proposed extension of the Central Line (here coloured blue) from Bank to Liverpool Street is marked.
[Ref: 17437]    £400.00 ($500 • €460 rates)


HORNE & Co. [A plan of Crystal Palace for the sale by auction of 1911]
Plan of Crystal Palace, Sydenham. For Sale by Auction by Howard Frank, of Messrs. Knight, Frank & Rutley, and J. Roy Lancaster of |Messrs. Horne & Co. London: Knight, Frank & Rutley, 1911. Tinted lithograph, 1010 x 1270mm. Laid on linen, original binding folds.
A large plan of Crystal Palace, adapted from the Ordnance Survey by the surveyors Horne & Co, and lithographed by Martin, Hood & Larkin. It was published in the auction catalogue for the auction sale of Crystal Palace in 1911, and details the grounds and the buildings in the immediate surroundings, including the railways stations and fire station. It shows the site of 'Sir Hiram Maxim's Captive Flying Machines', a fairground ride designed by the inventor of tre Maxim machine gun. The Crystal Palace was built in Hyde Park as a temporary building to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. Such was its popularity that it was re-erected in modified form at a permanent home in Sydenham in 1852, with two new railway stations to service it. Despite many successful exhibitions the owners went bankrupt in 1909; an announcement in The Times on 11th September 1911 set the date of the sale as 28th November 1911. However the auctioneer, Howard Frank, started a campaign to get the park saved for the nation. He has a luxurious brochure produced, containing fifty-two pages of photographs and engravings and sixty-four pages of text. It weighed approximately 3¼lb (without this map which was in a separate cover) and measured 16½in by 11in. The Lord Mayor of London, Sir Thomas Strong, called a meeting at the Mansion House for 23 October, for ‘all public bodies and persons interested in the acquisition of the Crystal Palace and its grounds for the use of the public forever’. The Mayor of Hampstead, William Woodward, wrote a letter to The Times, worried that the grounds were in danger of being given over to ‘football matches and other attractions for vulgar mobs’. Fortunately Robert Windsor-Clive, Lord Plymouth and Lord Lieutenant of Glamorgan, came forward with a deposit of £20,000 and, after reaching an agreement with the Court of Chancery, the rest of the sale price of 210,000. On the 9th November The Times ran a headline 'THE CRYSTAL PALACE SAVED'; by 1913 a fund started by the Lord Mayor was used to buy the park from Lord Plymouth.
[Ref: 16884]    £1,250.00 ($1,563 • €1,438 rates)


GILL, Leslie MacDonald. [A leaflet map of the London Underground]
London's UndergrounD. Map of Electric Railways of London. London: Dangerfield Printing Co., 1922. Coloured printed folding map, 275 x 345mm. Tiny repairs at folds, ink date on reverse.
A map of the London underground rail network, marked '1-3-22' on reverse, so published over a decade before the operating companies were amalgamated as 'London Transport'. It shows the stations with more geographic accuracy than the iconic design of Henry C. Beck of 1933. The style of the map is influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement: the script used for the station names is particularly striking. Leslie MacDonald Gill (1884-1947), younger brother of Eric Gill, specialised in graphic design in the Arts and Crafts style. His most important commission was from the Imperial War Graves Commission, designing the script used on Commission headstones and war memorials, including the 'Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme'. He produced a number of maps, two of which appeared in the British Museum exhibition 'Magnificent Maps in 2010: 'The Wonderground Map of London' (1914) & 'Tea Revives the World' (1940).
This item is currently on reserve


Records: 91 to 100 of 119
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