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Records: 91 to 100 of 332
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  LONDON 
 London Maps 

HORWOOD, Richard. [Westminster and Lambeth from an important large-scale survey of London]
[Westminster & Lambeth.] London: 1799 Two sheets conjoined, total 570 x 1010mm. Some original outline colour. Top corners repaired with some fill.
Two sheets from a map which Howgego describes as the "largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century", on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. The western part of the map shows the eastern end of St James's Park, with part of Pall Mall, Charing Cross with the King's Mews, Westminster Abbey and Hall, Great Peter Street and what is now Smith Square. Across Westminster Bridge Lambeth is shown, with St George's Circus and King's Bench Prison. Further north the Thames riverside is filled with timber yards where the South Bank Centre now stands. Near Westminster Bridge is Astley's Theatre, dedicated to equestrian shows. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 12670]    £1,100.00 ($1,420 • €1,250 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [The City and Whitechapel from an important large-scale survey of London]
[The City and Whitechapel.] London: 1799. Two sheets conjoined, total 570 x 1010mm. Some original outline colour. Top corners repaired with some fill.
The City and Whitechapel from a map Howgego describes as the "largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century", on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. Among the landmarks are the Bank of England & the Royal Exchange, Guildhall, Moorfields and Tower Hill. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 12671]    £1,200.00 ($1,549 • €1,363 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [Walworth from an important large-scale survey of London]
[Walworth, with the Old Kent Road.] London: 1799. Two sheets conjoined, total 570 x 1010mm. Some original outline colour. Top corners repaired with some fill.
Walworth, in the Borough of Southwark, with Walworth Road, the Old Kent Road and Grange Road. At the time of publication Walworth Common was open land; now it is completely developed. Howgego describes Horwood's map as the "largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century", on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 12672]    £550.00 ($710 • €625 rates)


HORWOOD, Richard. [Marylebone & St Pancras from an important large-scale survey of London]
[Marylebone & St Pancras .] London: 1794-5. Two sheets conjoined, total 570 x 1010mm. Some original outline colour. Top corners repaired.
Marylebone & St Pancras from a map that Howgego describes as the "largest and most important London map of the eighteenth century", on a scale of 26 inches to a mile. 'The New Road from Paddington' (Euston Road) is shown from Tottenham Court Road west to Lisson Grove (birthplace of Eliza Doolittle in Shaw's 'Pygmalion). Also marked are Fitzroy Square, Warren Street, Harley Street, Baker Street and the Workhouse where the University of Westminster now stands. There is little development north of the Euston Road, but of interest is 'Jews Harp House', a coffee house that was a hot-bed of Jacobin insurrection. William Blake refers to it and the farm shown nearby in his poem 'Jerusalem': 'The Jews-harp-house & the Green Man; / The Ponds here Boys to bathe delight: / The fields of Cows by Willans farm: Shine in Jerusalems pleasant sight'. Within twenty years both had disappeared as the area was developed as Regent's Park. Horwood's intention was to mark each house's number (a practice started in 1735), but this was abandoned as impractical. He started his scheme in 1790, expecting to be finished by 1792: by 1794 he was apologising to his subscribers (including George III); in 1798 he received a loan of £500 from the Phœnix Fire-Office, for whom Horwood worked as a surveyor, to finish the map. However this assistance was not enough to stop Horwood dying in poverty in 1803. HOWGEGO: 200, and pp.21-22.
[Ref: 12668]    £900.00 ($1,162 • €1,022 rates)


STRATFORD, James. [London at the beginning of the 19th century]
London, extending from the Head of the Paddington Canal West, to the West India Docks East with the propsed Improvements between the Royal Exchange and Finsbury Square. London, 1806. Coloured. 300 x 530mm. Minor repair to left margin.
A plan of London showing from the Serpentine clockwise to Islington, the West India Docks and Lambeth, with an extensive key underneath. Engraved by Russell for Hughson's 'London, being an accurate history and description of the British metropolis'. HOWGEGO: 240.
[Ref: 15860]    £450.00 ($581 • €511 rates)


Anonymous. [Early 19th century plan of London]
Plan von London und Westminster mit der Borough von Southwark. Prague, 1810. 250 x 495mm.
A Czech plan of London, seemingly based on the Horwood map. The map reaches Knightsbridge in the west, Islington in the north, Stepney in the east and Newington in the south. Not listed in Howgego.
[Ref: 18257]    £425.00 ($549 • €483 rates)


LANGLEY & BELCH. [Town plan of Georgian London with illustrated borders]
Langley & Belch's New Map of London. London, 1812. Original colour. Dissected and laid on linen as issued; 530 x 800mm.
An uncommon map of London, with 24 vignette views of buildings. On the map and illustrated are the West & East India Docks, opened 1802 & 1806 respectively. Of interest is the attention paid to 'Projected Works', coloured yellow. These include: Regents Park and the 'Intended Road' (Regent Street) running south (although still showing Jew's Harp tea rooms and Willans Farm, both mentioned in William Blake's 'Jerusalem'); the ''Intended Strand Bridge'' (renamed for the future Battle of Waterloo) with its southern approach roads; 'Regent Bridge', now Vauxhall Bridge, and the Vauxhall Bridge Road; and the Duke of Bedford's development around Tavistock Square in Bloomsbury. HOWGEGO: 256, plate 13. First state.
[Ref: 18820]    £2,800.00 ($3,615 • €3,181 rates)


BOWLER & TRIQUET. [A Georgian map of Tottenham]
A Map of the Parish of Tottenham in the County of Middlesex from an Actual Survey. London, 1818. Coloured. Sheet 405 x 580mm. Laid on linen as issued, binding folds flattened.
A map of Tottenham Parish, engraved by R.E. Bowler and E.G. Triquet for William Robinson's 'History and Antiquities of the Parish of Tottenham High Cross'. Besides marking the houses, the area of each field is measured, in acres, rods and perches. The site of the White Hart Lane stadium is still fields, on the corner of High Road and Marsh Lane (now renamed Park Lane.)
[Ref: 14422]    £450.00 ($581 • €511 rates)


CARY, John. [An early 19th century large scale map of London]
Cary's New and Accurate Plan of London and Westminster, the Borough of Southwark and parts adjacent; viz. Kensington, Chelsea, Islington, Hackney, Walwortth, Newington... and Plans of the New London & East & West India Docks. London, 1820. Original colour. Dissected and laid on linen, as issued, total 820 x 1510mm.
A superbly detailed record of late-Georgian London. To the west the extent is the 'Kensington Gravel Pits' or Notting Hill Gate as it is known today; to the east the plan has been extended past Limehouse to the new docks, the Isle of Dogs and the River Lea; to the north it is Islington, with its workhouse, and to the south are Kennington and Walworth. HOWGEGO: 184.
[Ref: 16278]    £4,500.00 ($5,810 • €5,112 rates)


Anonymous. [A design plan of the new Sand Hills Estate, St Pancras]
Plan of the Sand Hills Estate, in the Parish of St. Pancras and County of Middlesex: the Property of The Skinners Company. London: J. Shuttleworth &co., c.1830. Lithographic map with hand colour, dissected and laid on linen as issued, in morocco slipcase with 'S.C.' and 'Sandhills' in gilt. Box with some signs of wear.
A plan of the Sand Hills Estate, which straddled what is now the Euston Road, with each house delineated. The part north of the Euston Road has now been redeveloped with the British Library and King's Cross Station, but south of the road much is recognisable but renamed: Euston Road is simply 'The New Road'; Cartwright Crescent is named here 'Burton Crescent'; and Hastings Street is 'Spelhurst Street'. Judd Street and Leigh Street have retained their names. The estate was developed by The Skinners' Company, a medieval trade guild of the furriers, one of the 'Great Twelve' livery companies of London.
[Ref: 12359]    £1,750.00 ($2,259 • €1,988 rates)


Records: 91 to 100 of 332
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