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Records: 1 to 10 of 402
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  BOOKS 

SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [First Edition of the Nuremberg Chronicle, with a preserved panel from the original publisher's binding, and manuscript note in Schedel's own hand]
Liber chronicarum... Nuremberg: Anton Koberger, for Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermeister, 12th July 1493. FIRST EDITION. Imperial folio (449 x 309mm), 19th century full blind stamped morocco, gilt, gauffred edges & green watered silk doublures, with an inlaid panel of stamped brown stained pigskin from the original publisher's binding designed by Wohlgemut or Pleydenwurff; 326 leaves (of 328, without the final two blank leaves), foliated (20), I-CCLXVI, (6) CCLXVII-CCXCIX, (1). (with 55/6 blank, following the unfoliated Sarmatian supplement, ff. CCLVIIII- CCLXI blank except for printed headlines.) Types: 9:165G (headlines and headings), 15:110bG (text), 64 lines and headline, table and parts of text double column. 1809 woodcut illustrations printed from 646 blocks by Michael Wohlgemut, Wilhelm Pleydenwurff and workshop. The illustrations include 29 double page town views, 8 full page cuts and double page maps of the World and Europe by Hieronymus Münzer after Nicholas Khrypffs.
The Liber Chronicarum, or Nuremberg Chronicle, was the most extensively illustrated printed book of the fifteenth century, 646 woodcuts were used to illustrate the Chronicle, but many were used more than once, so there are a total of 1,809 illustrations. It was published the year that Columbus returned to Europe after discovering America, and the woodcuts were done by Michael Wohlgemut and his stepson Wilhelm Pleydenwurff, both of whom are mentioned, very unusually, in the colophon of the work. The young Albrecht Dürer, the publisher Kolberger's godson, was apprenticed to Wolgemut from 1486-1489 and some of the plates, particularly that of the Last Judgement, have been tentatively ascribed to him. The text consists of a year-by-year account of notable events in world history from the creation down to the year of publication. It is a mixture of fact and fantasy, recording events like the invention of printing, but also repeating stories from Herodotus. Even the world map is decorated with strange beings from the far reaches, including a cyclops and a four-eyed man. The panel from the original publisher's pigskin binding, designed for the 'Liber Chronicarum' and appearing on a number of recorded copies, depicts the tree of Jesse, the root of which issues from the sleeping Jesse and contains in its branches the genealogy of Christ. In addition mounted on the xylographic title is a clipped inscription in red ink in a later fifteenth century hand, stating 'the venerable Fr Georg Pinkheimer, prior of the Carthusians at Nuremberg, gave this book to Hartmann Schedel, doctor of medicine, on the Ides of August 1496'. Schedel was an enthusiastic book collector with a large library and the inscription appears to match his hand, however, it is clear that the inscription is taken from another book as it is unlikely that Pinkheimer would have given Schedel a copy of his own book. Hartmann Schedel, a Nuremberg doctor, humanist and author of the present work, ensured its lasting importance due to the attention to and inclusion of contemporary events. Therefore he included the invention of printing, Wycliffe's heresy, and explorations in Africa and the Atlantic. The publication of this book was an enormous undertaking, requiring five years of planning and a year and a half of printing. This process is well documented due to the survival of two maquette copies, the original contract between Kolberger and his partners (Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermeister), the contract between Kolberger and the artists and other archival material in the Nuremberg Stadtbibliothek. Provenance: Dr John Bellingham Inglis; by descent to Dr C. Inglis with his bookplate to front pastedown; sold at auction in London, 11th June 1900; George Dunn of Wooley Hall with his bookplate; Cornelius J. Hauck.
[Ref: 4609]    £85,000.00 ($109,650 • €100,300 rates)


  GLOBES 

WYLD, James. [An English mid-Victorian table globe]
A Terrestrial Globe Compiled from the latest & Most Authentic Sources, Including all the recent Geographical Discoveries. London, c.1870. Printed globe, 12" diameter (305mm), on three-legged, wooden stand, brass meridian and horizon with engraved paper calendar and zodiac, total height 18" (460mm), A few small signs of wear.
A fine table globe, marking James Clark Ross's discoveries in Antarctica (1841), 'The United States of Colombia' (1861-88) and Alaska as part of the United States (1867).
[Ref: 17297]    £7,000.00 including VAT ($9,030 • €8,260 rates)


  WORLD 
 World Maps 

SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [One of the earliest world maps available to the collector, decorated with bizarre creatures]
[World.] Nuremberg, Anton Koberger, 1493, Latin text edition. Woodcut, printed area 370 x 520mm, good margins.
A fine example of the famous incunable world map from the 'Nuremberg Chronicle', published a matter of months after Columbus' return to Spain after his first voyage to the New World, so including nothing of his discoveries. Instead, appropriately for a history of the world, it takes a retrospective view, with the cartography that of Ptolemy, with a land-locked Indian Ocean with the island of Taprobana, but given a biblical theme by depicting the three sons of Noah in the borders. Down the left are seven vignettes of mythological creatures, with a further 14 on the reverse, taken from the works of Herodotus, Solinus and Pliny. These include figures with six arms, four eyes or a bird-neck and a centaur. The text describes which parts of the world they inhabit. SHIRLEY: 19.
[Ref: 17465]    £14,500.00 ($18,705 • €17,110 rates)


SCANDIANESE, Tito Giovanni. [An Italian poem about hunting, illustrated with Ludovico Dolce's world map]
I Quattro Libri della Caccia. [Bound with] La Sfera di Proclo. Venice: Gabriel Giolito et Fratelli, 1556, First Edition. 4to, contemporary limp vellum; pp. 164 + 20, 16 woodcut vignettes with other woodcut deorations. [&] pp. 23, title with woocut illustration, other woodcut decorations, publisher's emblem at end. Wormholes in titlepage, a few pages and emblem, ink stamp on spine and covers.
An Italian illustrated hunting poem with a short treatise on falconry at the end, written under this pseudonym by Tito Gazarini (1518-82). On page 23 is a printing of Ludovico Dolce's unusual world map which is an amalgam of Macrobius and Gastaldi: the shape is that of Macrobius, with the zones around the equator and windheads; however on North America are 'Terra del Bacalaosa' and 'Nueva Hispania' of Gastaldi. The Straits of Magellan also appear.
[Ref: 17393]    £1,750.00 ($2,258 • €2,065 rates)


BÜNTING, Heinrich. [Bünting's famous clover leaf map of the world]
Die ganze Welt in ein Kleberblat... Magdeburg, 1581-. Woodcut, printed area 270 x 380mm. A very fine and dark impression. Binding folds reinforced on verso.
Bünting's famous clover leaf map, showing Europe, Asia and Africa as separate leaves connected to Jerusalem at the centre. England and Scandinavia appear as islands at the top of the map; the New Wolrd fills the bottom left corner. The map was published in Bünting's 'Itinerarium Sacræ Scripturæ' (Travel through Holy Scripture), a reworking of the bible as a travel guide. Also included were maps of Europe as the Virgin Mary and Asia as Pegasus. This design was of particular relevence to Bünting because a clover leaf features on the arms of his hometown of Hanover. SHIRLEY: World 142.
[Ref: 17369]    £6,500.00 ($8,385 • €7,670 rates)


BLAEU, Johannes. [Joannes Blaeu's double-hemisphere world map with colouring attributed to Dirk Janszoon van Santen]
Nova et Accuratissima Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula. Amsterdam,1662, Latin text edition. Exceptional original colour, with gold and silver highlights. 415 x 540mm. Repair to split in centre fold in lower margin.
A new double-hemisphere world map, drawn up by Johannes Blaeu to replace the map first issued by his father Willem in 1606 and used in their atlases from 1630. This example probably coloured by one of the most famous Dutch colourists Dirk Janszoon van Santen. This new map is a great departure in style, being double-hemisphere rather than the former Mercator Projection map. Above the map are allegorical figures of the planets, the sun & moon, with two cartographers at the sides. Underneath are allegorical figures of the Four Seasons, each drawn by either birds or animals. The cartography is much improved, with the removal of the Great Southern Continent and more contemporary and the addition of the pre-Cook outlines of Australia and New Zealand. Unfortunately Blaeu has chosen to show California as an island, dropping the peninsular depiction of his father. This example comes from the first issue of the 'Atlas Major', the first atlas to contain this map. SHIRLEY: World 428.
[Ref: 16806]    £20,000.00 ($25,800 • €23,600 rates)


DE WIT, Frederick. [A Dutch World map with superb decorative borders]
Nova Orbis Tabula in Lucem Edita. Amsterdam, 1675. Original colour. 465 x 540mm. Minor reinforcing to verdigris cracks on verso
An exquisite seventeenth century map of the world in double-hemisphere, with two further spheres showing the northern and southern hemispheres and cherubs in the cusps. The four corners are taken up with vignettes of the seasons, each with references to the Elements and the Zodiac. The first state of the map was issued c.1670, but the cherubs in the cusps and the engraved border mark this as the second state. Another plate replaced it 1680. SHIRLEY: World 451 - ''one of the most attractive of its time... one of the finest that is relatively easily obtainable by the map collector'.
[Ref: 17451]    £5,500.00 ($7,095 • €6,490 rates)


STOOPENDAAL, Daniel. [Late 17th century double-hemisphere map of the world]
Orbis Terrarum Tabula Recens Emendata et in Lucem edita. Rotterdam, c.1680. 355 x 465mm. A fine and dark impression.
A double-hemisphere world map engraved by Stoopendahl for a Dutch bible. On the map California is an island and Australia and New Zealand are shown as partial outlines, a century before Cook. The corners have allegorical figures of the four continents with example of animals from each one, and the cusps have diagrams of the Solar System. SHIRLEY: 498.
[Ref: 17313]    £1,600.00 ($2,064 • €1,888 rates)


ZAHN, Johann. [A highly decorative pair of hemispheres]
Facies Una Hemisphærii Terrestris.; Facies Altera Hemisphærii Terrestris. Nuremberg, c.1696, coloured, each 360 x 415mm. Centerfolds restored.
This fine pair of hemispheres was the second World map from Zahn's "Mundus Mirabili". The geography is based on traditional Dutch maps of the 1660's and shows such anomalies as California as an island, Australia with an incomplete coastline and joined to Papua New Guinea and New Zealand denoted by only one coast. Also shown is the strait of Anian which was thought to connect Siberia and Alaska. With a very fine border to each map depicting the seasons as classical figures and the signs of the Zodiac. Johann Zahn (1631-1707)was a philosopher of the Præmonstratensian order in Würtzburg, he wrote a number of pseudo-scientific works accompanied by engravings of the highest standard. His work was produced during a period of history known as the "Enlightenment" when scientific experimentation and philosophical debate were encouraged by a European nobility hungry for new knowledge. Shirley 584 illus.
[Ref: 9684]    £3,200.00 ($4,128 • €3,776 rates)


WELLS, Edward. [Double-hemisphere map of the world with prospects of Oxford]
A New Map of the Terraqueous Globe according to the latest Discoveries and most general Divisions of it into Continents and Oceans. Oxford, 1700. Coloured. 375 x 510mm.
Double hemisphere world map with decorative borders including a view of the Bodleian Library in Oxford. The map has America associated with Atlantis, with California marked as an island. The map was published in the 'New Set of Maps of Both Ancient and Present Geography', dedicated to Prince William, son of Princess Anne Stuart, who was being groomed for the English monarchy, but who died the year this map was published, two years before his mother became queen in 1702. The engraver was Michael Burghers, a Dutchman who came to England and became Engraver to Oxford University. His most famous work was the map for Plot's 'Natural History of Oxfordshire', 1677.
[Ref: 17468]    £1,250.00 ($1,613 • €1,475 rates)


Records: 1 to 10 of 402
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