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Records: 1 to 10 of 325
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  BOOKS 

SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [First Edition of the Nuremberg Chronicle, with a preserved panel from the original publisher's binding, and manuscript note in Schedel's own hand]
Liber chronicarum... Nuremberg: Anton Koberger, for Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermeister, 12th July 1493. FIRST EDITION. Imperial folio (449 x 309mm), 19th century full blind stamped morocco, gilt, gauffred edges & green watered silk doublures, with an inlaid panel of stamped brown stained pigskin from the original publisher's binding designed by Wohlgemut or Pleydenwurff; 326 leaves (of 328, without the final two blank leaves), foliated (20), I-CCLXVI, (6) CCLXVII-CCXCIX, (1). (with 55/6 blank, following the unfoliated Sarmatian supplement, ff. CCLVIIII- CCLXI blank except for printed headlines.) Types: 9:165G (headlines and headings), 15:110bG (text), 64 lines and headline, table and parts of text double column. 1809 woodcut illustrations printed from 646 blocks by Michael Wohlgemut, Wilhelm Pleydenwurff and workshop. The illustrations include 29 double page town views, 8 full page cuts and double page maps of the World and Europe by Hieronymus Münzer after Nicholas Khrypffs.
The Liber Chronicarum, or Nuremberg Chronicle, was the most extensively illustrated printed book of the fifteenth century, 646 woodcuts were used to illustrate the Chronicle, but many were used more than once, so there are a total of 1,809 illustrations. It was published the year that Columbus returned to Europe after discovering America, and the woodcuts were done by Michael Wohlgemut and his stepson Wilhelm Pleydenwurff, both of whom are mentioned, very unusually, in the colophon of the work. The young Albrecht Dürer, the publisher Kolberger's godson, was apprenticed to Wolgemut from 1486-1489 and some of the plates, particularly that of the Last Judgement, have been tentatively ascribed to him. The text consists of a year-by-year account of notable events in world history from the creation down to the year of publication. It is a mixture of fact and fantasy, recording events like the invention of printing, but also repeating stories from Herodotus. Even the world map is decorated with strange beings from the far reaches, including a cyclops and a four-eyed man. The panel from the original publisher's pigskin binding, designed for the 'Liber Chronicarum' and appearing on a number of recorded copies, depicts the tree of Jesse, the root of which issues from the sleeping Jesse and contains in its branches the genealogy of Christ. In addition mounted on the xylographic title is a clipped inscription in red ink in a later fifteenth century hand, stating 'the venerable Fr Georg Pinkheimer, prior of the Carthusians at Nuremberg, gave this book to Hartmann Schedel, doctor of medicine, on the Ides of August 1496'. Schedel was an enthusiastic book collector with a large library and the inscription appears to match his hand, however, it is clear that the inscription is taken from another book as it is unlikely that Pinkheimer would have given Schedel a copy of his own book. Hartmann Schedel, a Nuremberg doctor, humanist and author of the present work, ensured its lasting importance due to the attention to and inclusion of contemporary events. Therefore he included the invention of printing, Wycliffe's heresy, and explorations in Africa and the Atlantic. The publication of this book was an enormous undertaking, requiring five years of planning and a year and a half of printing. This process is well documented due to the survival of two maquette copies, the original contract between Kolberger and his partners (Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermeister), the contract between Kolberger and the artists and other archival material in the Nuremberg Stadtbibliothek. Provenance: Dr John Bellingham Inglis; by descent to Dr C. Inglis with his bookplate to front pastedown; sold at auction in London, 11th June 1900; George Dunn of Wooley Hall with his bookplate; Cornelius J. Hauck.
[Ref: 4609]    £85,000.00 ($107,100 • €98,600 rates)


  GLOBES 

Anonymous. [An Italian Armillary Sphere]
[Armillary Sphere] Italy, c. 1825. Wooden stand and rings, paper, brass, gores on terrestrial sphere. 350mm x 190mm in diameter.
The outermost sphere measures 19 centimetres in diameter and is composed of two wooden circles, which are perpendicularly fixed to each other and represent latitude and longitude. one of them is inscribed with ‘coluro de solstizj’ and the other with ‘coluro degli equinozj’. Both are also labeled with inscriptions for fixed stars, and at their intersections are the Poles. Running horizontally is another circle, marked internally with ‘circolo dell’eclittica’, and enclosed by a zodiacal strip 2.6 centimetres wide. The strip is graduated and lists the zodiacal signs with their symbols above and the gregorian calendar months below. Six further rings (or ''armillae'', in Latin) are mounted inside the outer skeleton, at the heart of which is fixed the gilt sphere representing the Sun. Furthest away from this are the ring of Saturn, then Jupiter, Mars, earth, Venus and Mercury. Earth’s globe measures 2.5 centimetres in diameter and is connected to the main axis via one brass arm that also connects it to the small disc representing the Moon. All rings can be moved around to best describe and understand their orbits. Each planetary ring is filled with information regarding the planet’s inclination, the revolution time in days, hours and minutes, and the distance to the Sun in ‘Miriamenti o Leghe Nuove’. A similar French-language example is kept at the national Maritime Museum in Greenwich, London. Dekker, Elly, ‘Globes at Greenwich’, OUP, 1999, ASTO631.
[Ref: 16854]    £14,000.00 including VAT ($17,640 • €16,240 rates)


TRIPENSEE PLANETARIUM COMPANY. [A 1930s model of the Earth's rotation around the Sun]
[Tellurian.] Saginaw, Michigan, c.1930. Tellurian, with Bakelite Sun, arm and base (with iron weight), Earth with paper gores, wooden Moon and Venus, chain mechanism, compass on arm. Earth, Moon and Venus with signs of wear.
A tellurian, an instrument that demonstates the movement of the Earth around the Sun, how the seasons result from the tilt of the earth, and how the Earth's rotation on its axis cause night and day. The movements of the Moon and Venus also feature in the mechanism.
[Ref: 16927]    £2,200.00 including VAT ($2,772 • €2,552 rates)


  WORLD 
 World Maps 

BÜNTING, Heinrich. [Bünting's famous clover leaf map of the world]
Die ganze Welt in ein Kleberblat... Magdeburg, 1581-. Woodcut, printed area 270 x 380mm. A very fine and dark impression. Binding folds reinforced on verso.
Bünting's famous clover leaf map, showing Europe, Asia and Africa as separate leaves connected to Jerusalem at the centre. England and Scandinavia appear as islands at the top of the map; the New Wolrd fills the bottom left corner. The map was published in Bünting's 'Itinerarium Sacræ Scripturæ' (Travel through Holy Scripture), a reworking of the bible as a travel guide. Also included were maps of Europe as the Virgin Mary and Asia as Pegasus. This design was of particular relevence to Bünting because a clover leaf features on the arms of his hometown of Hanover. SHIRLEY: World 142.
[Ref: 17369]    £6,500.00 ($8,190 • €7,540 rates)


DE BRY, Johann Theodore. [A world map celebrating the voyage of Willem Schouten]
[Guilhelmi Schouten in australem oceanum expeditio.] Oppenheim: de Bry, c.1619. Engraved map 170 x 210mm, set in letterpress.
A double-hemisphere world map used as a frontispiece to De Bry's 'Pars Undecima Americæ' (Grand Voyages Part XI), which contained the account of the voyage of Willem Shouten (c.1567-1625) in which he was the first to round Cape Horn (1616). The map marks his route but has little other detail. The borders, on the other hand, are finely-engraved, with large portraits of Schouten and Magellan and medallion portraits of Francis Drake, Olivier van Noordt, Thomas Cavendish and Joris van Spilbergen. SHIRLEY: 301.
[Ref: 17013]    £950.00 ($1,197 • €1,102 rates)


DE WIT, Frederick. [A Dutch World map with superb decorative borders]
Nova Orbis Tabula in Lucem Edita. Amsterdam, 1675. Original colour. 465 x 540mm. Minor reinforcing to verdigris cracks on verso
An exquisite seventeenth century map of the world in double-hemisphere, with two further spheres showing the northern and southern hemispheres and cherubs in the cusps. The four corners are taken up with vignettes of the seasons, each with references to the Elements and the Zodiac. The first state of the map was issued c.1670, but the cherubs in the cusps and the engraved border mark this as the second state. Another plate replaced it 1680. SHIRLEY: World 451 - ''one of the most attractive of its time... one of the finest that is relatively easily obtainable by the map collector'.
[Ref: 17451]    £5,500.00 ($6,930 • €6,380 rates)


KIRCHER, Athanasius. [The world after the biblical Flood]
Geographia Conjecturalis de Orbis Terrestris Post Diluvium Transformatione ex Variorum Geographorum Sententia cui Author Subscribit. Amsterdam: Jansson van Waesburge, 1675. 350 x 490mm. Repairs to binding folds and small tears. Strong impression.
An unusual map of the world, published non in atlas but in Kircher's 'Arca Noë', an analysis of the world before, during and after the Flood. Here Kircher conjectures which parts of the world were flooded, including Atlantis is the middle of the Atlantic. SHIRLEY: 470.
[Ref: 16895]    £950.00 ($1,197 • €1,102 rates)


STOOPENDAAL, Daniel. [Late 17th century double-hemisphere map of the world]
Orbis Terrarum Tabula Recens Emendata et in Lucem edita. Rotterdam, c.1680. 355 x 465mm. A fine and dark impression.
A double-hemisphere world map engraved by Stoopendahl for a Dutch bible. On the map California is an island and Australia and New Zealand are shown as partial outlines, a century before Cook. The corners have allegorical figures of the four continents with example of animals from each one, and the cusps have diagrams of the Solar System. SHIRLEY: 498.
[Ref: 17313]    £1,600.00 ($2,016 • €1,856 rates)


HOOGHE, Romeyn de. [A scarce double-hemisphere world map]
Nouvelle Mappe-Monde, Recemment Mise en Lumiere par Pierre van der Aa. Leiden: Pieter van der Aa, 1710. 260 x 350mm. A very fine example
A double-hemisphere world map with decorative borders, first published in Romeyn de Hooghe's 'Les Indes Orientales et Occidentales et autres lieux', a travel guide to the East and West Indies. The corners feature allegorical scenes representing the four seasons: top left is Spring, with a plough and figures surveying by taking star sightings; top right is Summer, with a harvest and the associated riches; bottom left is Autumn, with a military campaign; and bottom right is Winter, with people walking on a frozen river. In the upper cusp is Ouroboros encircling a book representing the Word of God; in the lower cusp is a shadowy figure (a constellation?) in front of a plinth piled with wealth and symbols of culture. On the map California is an island; Japan is incomplete, as are both Australia and New Zealand.
[Ref: 16965]    £1,750.00 ($2,205 • €2,030 rates)


LA FEUILLE, Daniel de. [Miniature double hemisphere world]
Mapemonde Planisphere ou Carte Generale Du Monde. Amsterdam, Jeanne de la Feuille, 1729. Original colour. 160 x 220mm.
From 'Les Tablettes Guerrieres...', a military pocket atlas, this issue published by Daniel's daughter, who took over the business in 1727. A double-hemisphere world, showing California as an island and 'Jesso'.
[Ref: 17029]    £300.00 ($378 • €348 rates)


Records: 1 to 10 of 325
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