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Records: 1 to 10 of 288
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  AMERICA 

WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The first atlas map devoted to America]
Tabula Terre Nove. Strasbourg, Johannes Shott, 1513. Woodcut, printed area 385 x 445mm, paper watermarked with a fleur de lis, with good margins. Near mint condition
The rare first issue of Wäldseemüller's famous 'Admiral's map', the first printed atlas map specifically of the Americas. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. The twenty place names in North America suggest his sources were Portuguese, particularly the Cantino chart of 1502 and Caveri of c.1505. As the Gulf of Mexico and the Florida Peninsula appear before recorded voyages to either, this map is regarded as evidence of forgotten expeditions. It was Wäldseemüller's wall map of the world (1507) that first used the name 'America', although he was only using it for the parts of South America explored by Amerigo Vespucci. However others started using the name for the whole of the New World and here Wäldseemüller is trying to make amends: a Latin note reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. BURDEN: 3.
[Ref: 17346]   P.O.A.


WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The Fries version of Wäldseemüller's 'Admiral's map' of the Americas]
[Tabula Terræ Novæ .] Vienne: Michael Servetus, 1541. Woodcut, printed area 285 x 430mm.
One of the earliest obtainable maps to show the New World, this example being the fourth and last issue of the Fries reduction of Wäldseemüller's famous map, which is the first printed atlas map devoted to the Americas and said to have been compiled with the assistance of Columbus himself. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. In his version Fries added a Spanish flag over Cuba and a vignette scene in South America depicting cannibals and an opossum, both reported by Vespucci. It was Wäldseemüller's world map of 1507 that first used the name 'America', placing in southern South America, after Vespucci, who explored that region and proved it was not part of Asia. When the name began to be used for the entire landmass Wäldseemüller used this map to emphasise Columbus's importance: a Latin text above 'Terra Nova' reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. This map was originally intended not for an edition of Ptolemy but for a new 'Chronica mundi' being written by Wäldseemüller: his death c.1520 caused the project to be shelved, so the woodcuts were used to publish a smaller sized and so cheaper edition of the 'Geography'. The title, as above, is on the reverse within a plain border. BURDEN: 4.
[Ref: 18827]    £8,500.00 ($10,855 • €9,852 rates)


WÄLDSEEMÜLLER, Martin. [The Fries edition of Wäldseemüller's 'Admiral's map' of the Americas]
[Tabula Terræ Novæ .] Vienne: Michael Servetus, 1541. Coloured woodcut, printed area 285 x 430mm. A very fine example on heavy paper.
One of the earliest obtainable maps to show the New World, this example being the fourth and last issue of the Fries reduction of Wäldseemüller's famous map, which is the first printed atlas map devoted to the Americas and said to have been compiled with the assistance of Columbus himself. It shows the eastern coasts of America and the western coast of Europe & Africa 55º North to 35º South, with a rudimentary 'Florida', Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. In his version Fries added a Spanish flag over Cuba and a vignette scene in South America depicting cannibals and an opossum, both reported by Vespucci. It was Wäldseemüller's world map of 1507 that first used the name 'America', placing in southern South America, after Vespucci, who explored that region and proved it was not part of Asia. When the name began to be used for the entire landmass Wäldseemüller used this map to emphasise Columbus's importance: a Latin text above 'Terra Nova' reads 'This land and the adjacent islands were discovered by Christopher Columbus on the mandate of the King of Castile'. This map was originally intended not for an edition of Ptolemy but for a new 'Chronica mundi' being written by Wäldseemüller: his death c.1520 caused the project to be shelved, so the woodcuts were used to publish a smaller sized and so cheaper edition of the 'Geography'. The title, as above, is on the reverse within a plain border. BURDEN: 4.
[Ref: 17900]    £9,750.00 ($12,451 • €11,300 rates)


MUNSTER, Sebastian. [The first map of America as a continent]
Tabula novarum insularum, quas diversis respectibus Occidentales & Indianas vocant. Basle, Henri Petri, 1550. Latin edition. Woodcut, image size 270 x 340mm. Tiny paper repair on top margin, else excellent.
Munster's landmark map, the first to attempt to show America as a continent, yet demonstrating how little was known. On the map a narrow isthmus divides the Atlantic and Pacific in the region of the Carolinas, based on Verrazzano, and Yucatan is an island. The large island of Zipangri off the west coast is not California but Japan, based on the narrative of Marco Polo but a few years before any recorded visit to the islands by Europeans. The large vignette ship is the 'Victoria', the only survivor of Magellan's fleet of four. This is an example of the 5th state of 13, despite being published only ten years after the first issue. BURDEN: 12.
[Ref: 18709]    £4,650.00 ($5,938 • €5,389 rates)


MUNSTER, Sebastian. [The rare issue of Munster's America with longitude and latitude grids]
Novae Insula XXVI Nova Tabula. Basle: Henri Petri, 1552, Latin edition. Woodcut, sheet 300 x 385mm. Minor repairs at centre fold, otherwise an excellent example.
Munster's landmark map, the first to attempt to show America as a continent, yet demonstrating how little was known. On the map a narrow isthmus divides the Atlantic and Pacific in the region of the Carolinas, based on Verrazzano, and Yucatan is an island. The large island of Zipangri off the west coast is not California but Japan, based on the narrative of Marco Polo but a few years before any recorded visit to the islands by Europeans. The large vignette ship is the 'Victoria', the only survivor of Magellan's fleet of four. This is an example of the 6th state of 13, published in Munster's 'Geographia', the only printing with the longitude and latitude grid and the only dated edition (underneath Petri's colophon on the reverse), sixty years after Columbus's discovery of the New World. BURDEN: 12.
[Ref: 18761]    £6,000.00 ($7,662 • €6,954 rates)


ORTELIUS, Abraham. [The most famous map of the Americas, the cornerstone of any map collection]
America Sive Novi Orbis Nova Descriptio. Antwerp, 1575, Latin text edition. Original colour. 355 x 480mm. Tears professionally repaired.
This map of America is one of the most important and influential maps of the continent published in the 16th century. This example is from the first of three copper plates, all engraved by Frans Hogenberg, and the third state, with the Azores now correctly named and the latitude number '230' erased. BURDEN: 39; VAN DEN BROECKE: 9, iii of iii.
[Ref: 12816]    £2,800.00 ($3,576 • €3,245 rates)


ORTELIUS, Abraham. [The first printed map of the Pacific]
Maris Pacifici, (quod vulgo Mar del Zur) cum regionibus circumiacentibus, insulusque in eodem passim sparsis, novissima descriptio. Antwerp, 1592, Latin text edition. 345 x 495mm. A near mint condition example with wide margins.
An early example of the most sought-after of Ortelius's atlas maps, first published only two years earlier. Engraved in 1589, it pre-dates the concept of California as an island, has a huge island of New Guinea and an unrecognisable Japan. The south Pacific is filled with a vignette of the 'Victoria', Magellan's ship: his route through the Magellan Straits is shown, with Terra del Fuego depicted as part of the huge 'Terra Australis'. VAN DEN BROECKE: 12.
[Ref: 15637]    £7,000.00 ($8,939 • €8,113 rates)


ORTELIUS, Abraham. [Ortelius's third plate of the Americas]
America Sive Novi Orbis Nova Descriptio. Antwerp, 1598, Latin text edition. 355 x 480mm. Excellent impression, wide margins.
Classic antique map of the Americas printed from the last of three plates, all engraved by Frans Hogenberg, now with the famous extra bulge in South America removed and an extra cartouche over Anian. There is an engraved date of 1587 bottom right, and examples of the plate appeared in atlases the same year. BURDEN: 39; VAN DEN BROECKE: 11.
[Ref: 13288]    £3,600.00 ($4,597 • €4,172 rates)


DE BRY, Theodore. [An important book on early American exploration]
[The Great or American Voyages.] Frankfurt: 1594-1617. Parts I-VI only (of 13) in one volume. Latin text. Folio (335 x 235 mm), 17th century vellum over pasteboard, the flat spine with small panel outlined in gilt with rolls, titled in gilt within the panel. A few neat repairs, part VI lacking 2nd section (from page 108 including 2nd frontis. and 28 plates), binding with minor repairs to spine and the board edges, endpapers replaced.
De Bry's important collection of voyages of exploration to the Americas, containing several landmark maps of the continent. Included are Hariot's account of the English colony in Virginia (second edition, second issue, 1606), with the important map of the Roanoke colony in Virginia and plates after John White; Jacques Le Moyne's Florida (second edition, 1609), with his map of south east North America and engravings of Florida and its inhabitants; Hans Stadius's Brazil (second edition, first issue, 1605) with his map of Peru and Brazil; and Girolamo Benzoni's History of the New World (first two parts second editions, 1594 & 1617, the third the first edition of 1596), with maps of the Western Hemisphere, the West Indies and New Spain, and a view of Cusco.
[Ref: 12946]    £75,000.00 ($95,775 • €86,925 rates)


HONDIUS, Jodocus II. [The first atlas issue of this 17th century map of America]
America noviter delineata. Auct: Henrico Hondio. 1631. Amsterdam, Henricus Hondius, 1636. Latin text edition. Original colour. 370 x 490mm. Tiny hole in Paraguay filled.
Early edition of this decorative map of the Americas, with insets map of Greenland and tyhe South Pole. It was engraved in 1618 as part of a separate-issue set of maps of the world and continents with decorative borders, engraved by Jodocus Hondius II. He originally worked in the family firm with his brother Henricus, but left to found his own business. After his death in 1629 many of his plates were sold by his widow to Blaeu, much to the annoyance of Henricus, but this plate stayed in the family. In 1631 Henricus put his own name on the plate and added this date, trimming off the decorative borders to make the map fit the standard atlas format. It was still another two years before it appeared in an Appendix, and five until it was used in a new edition of the complete atlas, as this example. BURDEN: 192, state 3 of 5.
[Ref: 19628]    £2,200.00 ($2,809 • €2,550 rates)


Records: 1 to 10 of 288
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