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Records: 1 to 10 of 101
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  CELESTIAL 
 Celestial Maps 

BAYER, Johann. [A 17th century illustration of the constellation of Scorpio]
[Scorpio.] Ulm: Johann Gorlini, 1639. Coloured, with gold highlights. 285 x 380mm.
The constellation of Scorpio, one of the twelve signs of the Zodiac, engraved by Alexander Mair for Bayer's 'Uranometria', a star atlas that shaped the way the heavens would be perceived for more than two centuries. Johann Bayer (1572-1625), an Augsburg lawyer, was an amateur astronomer in the years just prior to the invention of the telescope. His most important innovation was a new system of identifying stars by Greek and Roman letters, known today as the Bayer designation. His 'Uranometria' ('Measuring the Sky'), first published 1603, was the first celestial atlas to contain a chart of the stars in the Southern Hemisphere. WARNER: Bayer 1.
[Ref: 14566]    £800.00 ($992 • €936 rates)


BAYER, Johann. [A pair of 17th century celestial hemispheres]
[The North & South Celestial Hemispheres.] Ulm: Johann Gorlini, 1639. Coloured. Pair, each 285 x 385mm. Some old ink mss. star names.
A pair of celestial charts depicting the northern and southern skies, engraved by Alexander Mair for Bayer's 'Uranometria'. Unlike the other plates, these charts do not show the constellations, only the brightest stars, unnamed. A few stars are named in old manuscript. The chart of Southern Hemisphere is one of the two earliest charts of the south to be published, both in the 'Uranometria'. In his writings Bayer credits the information on these new stars to the explorers Amerigo Vespucci, Andrea Corsali, Pedro de Medina & Pieter Dirksz de Keyser. His inclusion of de Keyser's work makes it likely that Bayer had access to a Dutch celestial globe, probably made by either Plancius or Hondius. Johann Bayer (1572-1625), an Augsburg lawyer, was an amateur astronomer in the years just prior to the invention of the telescope. His most important innovation was a new system of identifying stars by Greek and Roman letters, known today as the Bayer designation. His 'Uranometria' ('Measuring the Sky') was first published 1603. WARNER: Bayer 1.
[Ref: 14568]    £750.00 ($930 • €878 rates)


BAYER, Johann. [A 17th century illustration of the constellation of Capricorn]
[Capricorn.] Ulm: Johann Gorlini, 1639. Coloured, with gold highlights. 285 x 380mm.
The constellation of Capricorn, one of the twelve signs of the Zodiac, engraved by Alexander Mair for Bayer's 'Uranometria', a star atlas that shaped the way the heavens would be perceived for more than two centuries. Johann Bayer (1572-1625), an Augsburg lawyer, was an amateur astronomer in the years just prior to the invention of the telescope. His most important innovation was a new system of identifying stars by Greek and Roman letters, known today as the Bayer designation. His 'Uranometria' ('Measuring the Sky'), first published 1603, was the first celestial atlas to contain a chart of the stars in the Southern Hemisphere. WARNER: Bayer 1.
[Ref: 14574]    £800.00 ($992 • €936 rates)


BAYER, Johann. [A 17th century illustration of the constellation of Virgo]
[Virgo.] Ulm: Johann Gorlini, 1639. Coloured, with gold highlights. 285 x 380mm.
The constellation of Virgo, one of the twelve signs of the Zodiac, engraved by Alexander Mair for Bayer's 'Uranometria', a star atlas that shaped the way the heavens would be perceived for more than two centuries. Johann Bayer (1572-1625), an Augsburg lawyer, was an amateur astronomer in the years just prior to the invention of the telescope. His most important innovation was a new system of identifying stars by Greek and Roman letters, known today as the Bayer designation. His 'Uranometria' ('Measuring the Sky'), first published 1603, was the first celestial atlas to contain a chart of the stars in the Southern Hemisphere. WARNER: Bayer 1.
[Ref: 14577]    £800.00 ($992 • €936 rates)


BAYER, Johann. [A 17th century illustration of the constellation of Pisces]
[Pisces.] Ulm: Johann Gorlini, 1639. Coloured, with gold highlights. 285 x 380mm.
The constellation of Pisces, one of the twelve signs of the Zodiac, engraved by Alexander Mair for Bayer's 'Uranometria', a star atlas that shaped the way the heavens would be perceived for more than two centuries. Johann Bayer (1572-1625), an Augsburg lawyer, was an amateur astronomer in the years just prior to the invention of the telescope. His most important innovation was a new system of identifying stars by Greek and Roman letters, known today as the Bayer designation. His 'Uranometria' ('Measuring the Sky'), first published 1603, was the first celestial atlas to contain a chart of the stars in the Southern Hemisphere. WARNER: Bayer 1.
[Ref: 14578]    £800.00 ($992 • €936 rates)


BAYER, Johann. [A 17th century illustration of the constellation of Argo Navis]
[Argo Navis.] Ulm: Johann Gorlini, 1639. Coloured, with gold highlights. 285 x 380mm.
The constellation of Argo Navis, engraved by Alexander Mair for Bayer's 'Uranometria', a star atlas that shaped the way the heavens would be perceived for more than two centuries. Johann Bayer (1572-1625), an Augsburg lawyer, was an amateur astronomer in the years just prior to the invention of the telescope. His most important innovation was a new system of identifying stars by Greek and Roman letters, known today as the Bayer designation. His 'Uranometria' ('Measuring the Sky'), first published 1603, was the first celestial atlas to contain a chart of the stars in the Southern Hemisphere. WARNER: Bayer 1.
[Ref: 14579]    £650.00 ($806 • €761 rates)


BAYER, Johann. [A 17th century illustration of the constellation of Piscis Notius]
[Piscis Notius.] Ulm: Johann Gorlini, 1639. Coloured, with gold highlights. 285 x 380mm.
The constellation of Piscis Notius (Southern Fish), engraved by Alexander Mair for Bayer's 'Uranometria', a star atlas that shaped the way the heavens would be perceived for more than two centuries. Johann Bayer (1572-1625), an Augsburg lawyer, was an amateur astronomer in the years just prior to the invention of the telescope. His most important innovation was a new system of identifying stars by Greek and Roman letters, known today as the Bayer designation. His 'Uranometria' ('Measuring the Sky'), first published 1603, was the first celestial atlas to contain a chart of the stars in the Southern Hemisphere. WARNER: Bayer 1.
[Ref: 14580]    £600.00 ($744 • €702 rates)


BAYER, Johann. [A 17th century illustration of the constellation of Corona Australis]
[Corona Australis.] Ulm: Johann Gorlini, 1639. Coloured, with gold highlights. 285 x 380mm.
The constellation of Corona Australis (Southern Crown), engraved by Alexander Mair for Bayer's 'Uranometria', a star atlas that shaped the way the heavens would be perceived for more than two centuries. Johann Bayer (1572-1625), an Augsburg lawyer, was an amateur astronomer in the years just prior to the invention of the telescope. His most important innovation was a new system of identifying stars by Greek and Roman letters, known today as the Bayer designation. His 'Uranometria' ('Measuring the Sky'), first published 1603, was the first celestial atlas to contain a chart of the stars in the Southern Hemisphere. WARNER: Bayer 1.
[Ref: 14581]    £380.00 ($471 • €445 rates)


BAYER, Johann. [A 17th century illustration of the constellation of Perseus]
[Perseus.] Ulm: Johann Gorlini, 1639. Coloured, with gold highlights. 285 x 380mm.
The constellation of Perseus, engraved by Alexander Mair for Bayer's 'Uranometria', a star atlas that shaped the way the heavens would be perceived for more than two centuries. In his right hand he holds the head of Medusa the Gorgon. Johann Bayer (1572-1625), an Augsburg lawyer, was an amateur astronomer in the years just prior to the invention of the telescope. His most important innovation was a new system of identifying stars by Greek and Roman letters, known today as the Bayer designation. His 'Uranometria' ('Measuring the Sky'), first published 1603, was the first celestial atlas to contain a chart of the stars in the Southern Hemisphere. WARNER: Bayer 1.
[Ref: 14582]    £580.00 ($719 • €679 rates)


BAYER, Johann. [A 17th century illustration of the constellation of Ophiuchus Serpentarius]
[Ophiuchus Serpentarius.] Ulm: Johann Gorlini, 1639. Coloured, with gold highlights. 285 x 380mm.
The constellation of Ophiuchus (Serpentarius), engraved by Alexander Mair for Bayer's 'Uranometria', a star atlas that shaped the way the heavens would be perceived for more than two centuries. Johann Bayer (1572-1625), an Augsburg lawyer, was an amateur astronomer in the years just prior to the invention of the telescope. His most important innovation was a new system of identifying stars by Greek and Roman letters, known today as the Bayer designation. His 'Uranometria' ('Measuring the Sky'), first published 1603, was the first celestial atlas to contain a chart of the stars in the Southern Hemisphere. WARNER: Bayer 1.
[Ref: 14584]    £680.00 ($843 • €796 rates)


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