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Records: 1 to 10 of 64
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  WORLD 
 World Maps 

SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [One of the earliest world maps available to the collector, decorated with bizarre creatures]
[World.] Nuremberg, Anton Koberger, 1493, Latin text edition. Woodcut, printed area 370 x 520mm. Small stitch holes at centre fold, as usual, with old reinforcing.
A fine example of the famous incunable world map from the 'Nuremberg Chronicle', published a matter of months after Columbus' return to Spain after his first voyage to the New World, so including nothing of his discoveries. Instead, appropriately for a history of the world, it takes a retrospective view, with the cartography that of Ptolemy, with a land-locked Indian Ocean with the island of Taprobana, but given a biblical theme by depicting the three sons of Noah in the borders. Down the left are seven vignettes of mythological creatures, with a further 14 on the reverse, taken from the works of Herodotus, Solinus and Pliny. These include figures with six arms, four eyes or a bird-neck and a centaur. The text describes which parts of the world they inhabit. SHIRLEY: 19.
[Ref: 18707]    £12,500.00 ($16,263 • €13,963 rates)


FRISIUS, Gemma. [An uncommon cordiform world map with wind heads]
Mappa mundi, oft generael Carte der Werelt... Antwerp, c.1553. Woodcut, sheet 230 x 295mm. Narrow margins, repair in bottom margin.
An unusual woodcut world map, prepared by Frisius for inclusion in Peter Apian's Cosmography. Three very similar versions of the block have been identified: this is the second, used 1553-1584, but this edition is Dutch, so is either 1553, 1561 or 1564. North America is shown as a narrow peninsula named 'Baccalearum', a reference to the cod fishing that was already so important. In the seas, ships, seamonsters and a mermaid are shown. The border of the map contains the signs of the Zodiac, outside which are a number of wind-heads, including three skulls blowing from the south. Above the two maps are a pair of god-like figures, one of whom has the double-headed eagle of the Holy Roman Emperor on his breastplate. SHIRLEY: 82 (see 96 & 131 for further details).
[Ref: 17820]    £2,400.00 ($3,122 • €2,681 rates)


SCANDIANESE, Tito Giovanni. [An Italian poem about hunting, illustrated with Ludovico Dolce's world map]
I Quattro Libri della Caccia. [Bound with] La Sfera di Proclo. Venice: Gabriel Giolito et Fratelli, 1556, First Edition. 4to, contemporary limp vellum; pp. 164 + 20, 16 woodcut vignettes with other woodcut decorations. [&] pp. 23, title with woodcut illustration, other woodcut decorations, publisher's emblem at end. Wormholes in titlepage, a few pages and emblem, ink stamp on spine and covers.
An Italian illustrated hunting poem with a short treatise on falconry at the end, written under this pseudonym by Tito Gazarini (1518-82). On page 23 is a printing of Ludovico Dolce's unusual world map which is an amalgam of Macrobius and Gastaldi: the shape is that of Macrobius, with the zones around the equator and windheads; however on North America are 'Terra del Bacalaosa' and 'Nueva Hispania' of Gastaldi. The Straits of Magellan also appear.
[Ref: 17393]    £1,600.00 ($2,082 • €1,787 rates)


DOLCE, Lodovico. [An important Italian translation of Ovid's 'Metamorphoses']
Le Trasformationi di M. Lodovico Dolce. In questa quarta impressione da lui in molti luoghi ricorrette. Venice: Gabriel Giolito de Ferrari, 1557. Fourth edition. 4to, C18th half calf with marbled boards and endpapers; pp. (xvi)+309+(i)+colophon; woodcut title and text illustrations throughout, incl. world map on p.3. Unidentified engr. ex-libris label & Italian bookseller's label on front paste-down.
The fourth edition of Lodovico Dolce's translation of Ovid's 'Metamorphoses', first published 1553. It is illustrated with numerous woodcuts, including a world map which is an amalgam of Macrobius and Gastaldi: the shape is that of Macrobius, with the zones around the equator and windheads; however on North America are 'Terra del Bacalaosa' and 'Nueva Hispania' of Gastaldi. The Straits of Magellan also appear. Lodovico Dolce (c.1508-1568) was a prolific author: he wrote comedies, tragedies and histories; edited the works of Dante, Boccaccio and Tasso, among others; and translated Greek and Roman classics, including texts by Homer, Euripides Cicero and, of course, Ovid. Publius Ovidius Naso (43 BC-17/18 AD), better known as Ovid, published his Metamorphoses in 8 AD. A narrative poem, it contained over 250 myths relating to the world from its creation to the deification of Julius Cæsar. It was incredibly influential, and was one of the first books printed in English, by William Caxton in 1480. SHIRLEY: 95 for world map.
[Ref: 15464]    £1,800.00 ($2,342 • €2,011 rates)


BÜNTING, Heinrich. [Bünting's famous clover leaf map of the world]
Die ganze Welt in ein Kleberblat... Magdeburg, 1581-. Woodcut, printed area 270 x 380mm. A fine, dark printing.
Bünting's famous clover leaf map, showing Europe, Asia and Africa as separate leaves connected to Jerusalem at the centre. England and Scandinavia appear as islands at the top of the map; the New World fills the bottom left corner. The map was published in Bünting's 'Itinerarium Sacræ Scripturæ' (Travel through Holy Scripture), a reworking of the bible as a travel guide. Also included were maps of Europe as a Virgin Queen and Asia as Pegasus. This design was of particular relevance to Bünting because a clover leaf features on the arms of his hometown of Hanover. SHIRLEY: World 142.
[Ref: 17369]    £6,500.00 ($8,457 • €7,261 rates)


MERCATOR, Gerard. [The most decorative Ptolemaic world map]
Universalis Tabula Iuxta Ptolemæum. Amsterdam: Jodocus Hondius Jnr, 1618. Fine original colour. 350 x 490mm.
A map of the world according to Claudius Ptolemy of Alexandria, showing the world as known to the ancients, with the semi-mythical island of Taprobana but no America or Cape of Good Hope. However Mercator has dropped the land-locked Indian Ocean shown on earlier Ptolemaic maps. The map was engraved by Mercator himself for his 1578 edition of Ptolemy's 'Geography'; however this example comes from an edition of Petrus Bertius's 'Theatrum geographiae veteris'. The flamboyance of the strapwork-and-windhead borders makes this map the most decorative of the Ptolemaic world maps. SHIRLEY: World 139, plate 118, 'His general Ptolemaic map is one of the finest available... elegantly engraved'.
[Ref: 16747]    £7,500.00 ($9,758 • €8,378 rates)


DE BRY, Johann Theodore. [A world map celebrating the voyage of Willem Schouten]
[Guilhelmi Schouten in australem oceanum expeditio.] Oppenheim: de Bry, c.1619. Engraved map 170 x 210mm, set in letterpress.
A double-hemisphere world map used as a frontispiece to De Bry's 'Pars Undecima Americæ' (Grand Voyages Part XI), which contained the account of the voyage of Willem Shouten (c.1567-1625) in which he was the first to round Cape Horn (1616). The map marks his route but has little other detail. The borders, on the other hand, are finely-engraved, with large portraits of Schouten and Magellan and medallion portraits of Francis Drake, Olivier van Noordt, Thomas Cavendish and Joris van Spilbergen. SHIRLEY: 301.
[Ref: 17013]    £950.00 ($1,236 • €1,061 rates)


BLAEU, Willem Janszoon. [A fabulous example of Blaeu's famous carte à figures world map]
Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula. Amsterdam, c.1635, French text edition. Fine original colour. 410 x 540mm.
Shirley describes this world map as a 'classic single-sheet world map on Mercator's projection... celebrated as one of the supreme examples of the map maker's art'. It set the standard for vignette borders, with allegorical figures representing the sun, moon & known planets along the top, the Four Elements on the left, the Four Seasons on the right, and depictions of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World along the bottom. There are decorative cartouches for the title, dedication and explanation, two spheres for the north and south poles, compass roses and numerous galleons and sea monsters. Engraved by Josua van den Ende and originally issued separately in 1606 (under Blaeu's original name of Janszoon), this example comes from the fourth state, which dates from its use in Blaeu's atlases from 1630, with the first French edition issued 1635. As the earlier states were separate issues they are increasingly difficult to find. SHIRLEY: World 255.
[Ref: 18589]    £14,000.00 ($18,214 • €15,638 rates)


VISSCHER, Claes Janszoon. [A world map with portraits of the Twelve Cæsars]
Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula. Amsterdam, 1652. Original colour. 445 x 560mm. Restoration to margin and centre fold.
This magnificent planisphere manages to include 30 separate illustrations in its panels. Along the top and bottom are equestrian portraits of the Twelve Cæsars of Tacitus. The four corners feature female allegorical figures of the Continents, with Europe as a shepherdess, Asia seated on a camel, Africa on a crocodile and America on an armadillo! The left border has prospects of Rome, Amsterdam, Jerusalem and Tunis, interspersed with illustrations of European, Asian and African dress. The right border is given over completely to America: the prospects of Mexico City, Havana, Pernambuco and Todos os Santos Bay are separated by vignettes of North American natives, South Americans and the giants of the Magellan Strait. Originally published in 1639, most of the cartography has been copied from Blaeu, although Arctic America has been extended, as has the St Lawrence River. This state has the date 1652, the year of Visscher's death, added. SHIRLEY: 350.
[Ref: 17720]    £20,000.00 ($26,020 • €22,340 rates)


DE WIT, Frederick. [A Dutch World map with superb decorative borders]
Nova Orbis Tabula in Lucem Edita. Amsterdam, 1675. Original colour. 465 x 540mm. Minor reinforcements to verdigris cracks on verso
An exquisite seventeenth century map of the world in double-hemisphere, with two further spheres showing the northern and southern hemispheres and cherubs in the cusps. The four corners are taken up with vignettes of the seasons, each with references to the Elements and the Zodiac. The first state of the map was issued c.1670, but the cherubs in the cusps and the engraved border mark this as the second state. Another plate replaced it in 1680. SHIRLEY: World 451 - ''one of the most attractive of its time... one of the finest that is relatively easily obtainable by the map collector'.
[Ref: 17451]    £6,000.00 ($7,806 • €6,702 rates)


Records: 1 to 10 of 64
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