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Records: 1 to 7 of 7
  GLOBES 

Anonymous. [An Italian Armillary Sphere]
[Armillary Sphere] Italy, c. 1825. Wooden stand and rings, paper, brass, gores on terrestrial sphere. 350mm x 190mm in diameter.
The outermost sphere measures 19 centimetres in diameter and is composed of two wooden circles, which are perpendicularly fixed to each other and represent latitude and longitude. one of them is inscribed with ‘coluro de solstizj’ and the other with ‘coluro degli equinozj’. Both are also labeled with inscriptions for fixed stars, and at their intersections are the Poles. Running horizontally is another circle, marked internally with ‘circolo dell’eclittica’, and enclosed by a zodiacal strip 2.6 centimetres wide. The strip is graduated and lists the zodiacal signs with their symbols above and the gregorian calendar months below. Six further rings (or ''armillae'', in Latin) are mounted inside the outer skeleton, at the heart of which is fixed the gilt sphere representing the Sun. Furthest away from this are the ring of Saturn, then Jupiter, Mars, earth, Venus and Mercury. Earth’s globe measures 2.5 centimetres in diameter and is connected to the main axis via one brass arm that also connects it to the small disc representing the Moon. All rings can be moved around to best describe and understand their orbits. Each planetary ring is filled with information regarding the planet’s inclination, the revolution time in days, hours and minutes, and the distance to the Sun in ‘Miriamenti o Leghe Nuove’. A similar French-language example is kept at the national Maritime Museum in Greenwich, London. Dekker, Elly, ‘Globes at Greenwich’, OUP, 1999, ASTO631.
[Ref: 16854]    £14,000.00 including VAT ($18,060 • €16,520 rates)


NEWTON & Son. [A handsome pair of floor-standing library globes]
Newton's New & Improved Terrestrial Globe Embracing every recent Discovery. [&] Newton's New & Improved Celestial Globe On which all the Stars, Nebulæ & Clusters contained in the extensive Catalogue of the late F.Wellaston are accurately laid down... London, Newton & Son, 1842.
Pair of 12' (30cm) diameter globes, each standing 90cm high, with a single pedestal stand with three legs, with four quarter circles supporting the horizon ring. Each globe has 2 sets of twelve copper-engraved half gores, coloured and varnished. The meridian rings are brass, as are the English-style hour circles between the meridians and the globes. The horizon rings are also copper-engraved and varnished.
[Ref: 8521]    £29,000.00 including VAT ($37,410 • €34,220 rates)


WYLD, James. [An English mid-Victorian table globe]
A Terrestrial Globe Compiled from the latest & Most Authentic Sources, Including all the recent Geographical Discoveries. London, c.1870. Printed globe, 12" diameter (305mm), on three-legged, wooden stand, brass meridian and horizon with engraved paper calendar and zodiac, total height 18" (460mm), A few small signs of wear.
A fine table globe, marking James Clark Ross's discoveries in Antarctica (1841), 'The United States of Colombia' (1861-88) and Alaska as part of the United States (1867).
[Ref: 17297]    £7,000.00 including VAT ($9,030 • €8,260 rates)


MALBY & Co. [A mid-19th century table globe]
Malby's Terrestrial Globe Compiled from the latest & Most Authentic Sources Including all the recent Geographical Discoveries. London: Edward Stanford, 1879. Printed globe, 9" diameter (23cm), on wooden stand with brass meridian half-circle.
An attractive 9 inch terrestrial globe on its original wooden stand by an English globe maker.
[Ref: 16612]    £2,900.00 including VAT ($3,741 • €3,422 rates)


BETTS, John. [A Victorian collapsible globe]
By the Queens Royal Letter Patent Betts's New Portable Terrestrial Globe Compiled from the Latest and Best Authorities. British Empire coloured red. London, George Philip & Son Ltd, & Liverpool, Philip Son & Nephew, c.1880. Printed waxed cotton globe with 'umbrella ' mechanism, metal spindle and hanging ring. Globe circumference 1260mm extended, 770mm long including spindle. With the original wooden box wih title and publisher's adverts inside.
An early example of this unusual collapsible globe, made spherical by pushing a metal tube upwards along the spindle, It shows the British Empire covering approximately a quarter of the Earth's total land area. The globe's mechanism was invented by John Betts in 1860; this example is a later issue by G. Philip & Sons who manufactured them after Bett's death c. 1863 to c. 1925. We have estimated the date of this example by the marking of Charlotte Waters in Australia's Northern Territory, discovered 1871; and Bolivia having a Pacific coast, lost to Chile in 1883. Undoubtedly the reason for the superb condition of this globe is the original solid wood case.
[Ref: 16581]    £2,750.00 including VAT ($3,548 • €3,245 rates)


BETTS, John. [A collapsible globe]
Betts's Portable Terrestrial Globe Compiled from the Latest and Best Authorities. British Empire coloured red. London, George Philip & Son Ltd, & Liverpool, Philip Son & Nephew, c.1925. Printed waxed cotton globe with 'umbrella ' mechanism, metal spindle and hanging ring. Globe circumference 1,260mm extended, 770mm long including spindle. With the original cardboard tube with printed cover. Some faint staining.
An unusual collapsible globe, made spherical by pushing a metal tube upwards along the spindle, It shows the British Empire covering approximately a quarter of the Earth's total land area, with a population of 450 million people. The globe's mechanism was invented by John Betts in 1860; this example is a later issue by G. Philip & Sons who manufactured them after Bett's death c. 1863 to c. 1925. We have estimated the date of this example by the description of St Petersburg as 'Petrograd (Leningrad)' (renamed by the Soviets in 1924), and the separation of Transjordan from Palestine (1922) but before full independence from the British (1928). Undoubtedly the reason for the superb condition of this globe is the original cardboard tube.
[Ref: 16071]    £2,250.00 including VAT ($2,903 • €2,655 rates)


TRIPENSEE PLANETARIUM COMPANY. [A 1930s model of the Earth's rotation around the Sun]
[Tellurian.] Saginaw, Michigan, c.1930. Tellurian, with Bakelite Sun, arm and base (with iron weight), Earth with paper gores, wooden Moon and Venus, chain mechanism, compass on arm. Earth, Moon and Venus with signs of wear.
A tellurian, an instrument that demonstates the movement of the Earth around the Sun, how the seasons result from the tilt of the earth, and how the Earth's rotation on its axis cause night and day. The movements of the Moon and Venus also feature in the mechanism.
[Ref: 16927]    £2,200.00 including VAT ($2,838 • €2,596 rates)


Records: 1 to 7 of 7