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  ATLASES 
image of Galliae tabule geographicæ. [&] Belgii Inferioris Geographicæ tabule. [&] Germaniae tabule geographicæ. [&] Italiae, Sclavoniæ, et Græciæ tabule geographice...

MERCATOR, Gerard.
[Rare Lifetime Edition of Mercator's atlas]
Galliae tabule geographicæ. [&] Belgii Inferioris Geographicæ tabule. [&] Germaniae tabule geographicæ. [&] Italiae, Sclavoniæ, et Græciæ tabule geographice... Duisburg Clivorumn, 1585 (parts I-III) & 1589 (part IV). Folio, 17th century blind-decorated calf; Part I: pp. (x)(of 12)+(8)(index), engraved title and 16 maps; Part II: pp. (iv)+(4)(index), engraved title and 9 map; Part III: pp. (iv)+(blank)+(8)(index), engraved title and 26 maps; Part IV: pp. (ii)+(11)(index), engraved title, portrait of Mercator and 22 maps, plus Rumold Mercator's maps of the World and Europe. A total of 4 titles, 75 maps and one portrait, all in fine original colour. Small restoration to foot of spine. The maps are in excellent condition; Piedmont map printed upside-down.
A fine example of the First Issue of the first four parts of Gerard Mercator's atlas, all that was published during the lifetime. The first three parts were first issued in 1585 as ''Tabulæ Geographicæ", containing: 'Galliae tabule geographicæ' (France), 'Belgii Inferioris Geographicæ tabule' (Low Countries), and 'Germaniae tabule geographicæ' (Germany); the fourth part, 'Italiæ, Sclavoniæ et Græciæ' (Italy, Balkans and Greece) was published four years later, as this example. The fifth and final part, 'Atlantis Pars Altera', was delayed by a stroke that ended Mercator's productivity in 1589, not appearing until 1595, a year after the great cartographer's death. There are two extra maps appearing in this edition (as called for) attributed to Mercator's son, Rumold: the World (first issue in an atlas) and Europe (a pre-atlas issue without text on the back). KOEMAN'S ATLANTES NEERLANDICI: 1:001 +002
[Ref: 15413]  

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image of Theatro D'El Orbe De La Tierra de Abraham Ortello. El Qual Antes El Estremo Dia De Su Vida Por La Postrera Vez Ha Emendado, Y Con Nuevas Tablas Y Commentarios Augmentado Y Esclarecido.

ORTELIUS, Abraham.
[Ortelius's atlas in fine original colour]
Theatro D'El Orbe De La Tierra de Abraham Ortello. El Qual Antes El Estremo Dia De Su Vida Por La Postrera Vez Ha Emendado, Y Con Nuevas Tablas Y Commentarios Augmentado Y Esclarecido. Antwerp, Jan Baptist Vrients, 1602, Spanish edition. Folio, later full red morocco binding, new endpapers; engraved titlepage with arms of Philip of Austria, King of Spain, on verso, portrait of Ortelius with ownership label; pp. (xiii), 118 maps on 117 sheets as called for (nos 34 & 35 on one sheet), plus an extra plate, all in full hand original colour, some with gold highlights.
A Vrients edition of this important atlas, in the beautiful original colour that Vrients editions are famous for. The portrait of Ortelius has the ownership label of Vicente Juan de Lastanosa (1607-84), a Spanish writer and scholar. The extra plate is the view of the Escorial normally published in Ortelius's Parergon, this example with Latin text on the reverse. First published in 1570, Ortelius's 'Theatrum' was the first regularly produced atlas, and the first attempt to compile the best available maps in a uniform format. The first edition contained 53 maps, but over the years more maps were engraved, and this rare Spanish edition contains over twice as many, including the famous maps of Iceland (1585), the Pacific Ocean (1589), China (1584) and Japan (1595). There are numerous maps of America in this volume which provide a fascinating insight into the colonial expansion of the time, especially that of Spain, with "Terra Corterealis" commemorating the explorations of Gaspar and Miguel Corte-Real in 1500-01. The maps of the Far East are also of great cartographical interest, Tooley comments thus about the maps of China and Japan "An important map of China, the first to appear in a European atlas, was issued by Ortelius ... complied by Fr Ludovico Georgio, a Portuguese Jesuit, this map remained the standard type for the interior of China for over sixty years" and "The first separate map of Japan. This was compiled by Fr Ludovico Texeira and is important to the collector of Japanese maps as being the standard European map of Japan for many years". Over the course of publishing the "Theatrum", Ortelius made three separate plates for both the World and America maps: the present edition contains both in the third state, which are the first to mark the Solomon Islands. KOEMAN: Ort 34; TOOLEY "Maps & Mapmakers" P. 29.
[Ref: 10415]  

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image of Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

BRAUN, Georg & HOGENBERG, Frans.
[The 'earliest systematic city atlas']
Civitates Orbis Terrarum. Koln: 1572-1618. Six volumes, folio, C17th northern-European speckled sheep over pasteboard, expertly rebacked and cornered, original spines laid on, spines gilt in six compartments with raised bands; containing 6 engraved title-pages and 363 double-page plates of maps and views, all in full colour. With modern black morocco-backed cloth boxes, spines gilt.
A fine example of this monumental city atlas, produced as a companion to Ortelius's 'Theatrum Orbis Terrarum' atlas, with text by Georg Braun and plates engraved by Frans Hogenberg and others. The first volume was originally published in 1572, but these are a later printing, making a uniform set with the last Volume, number 6, which first appeared in 1617. The 363 plates are an impressive record of the notable towns of the period, mostly in Europe but also some in Asia and Africa, and even two in the New World, Mexico City and Cusco. The inclusion of dress and events in the foreground add extra local detail. KOEMAN: Vol 2, p 10: 'the earliest systematic city atlas'; TOOLEY: 'one of the great books of the World... a wonderful compendium of knowledge of life in Europe in the sixteenth century'.
[Ref: 12493]  

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image of Arataea, sive Signa Coelestia: in quibus Astronomicae Speculationes Veterum ad Archetypa Vetustissimi Aratæorum Caesaris Germanici...

GHEYN, Jacob de.
[Signa Coelestia]
Arataea, sive Signa Coelestia: in quibus Astronomicae Speculationes Veterum ad Archetypa Vetustissimi Aratæorum Caesaris Germanici... Amsterdam, Jan Jansson, 1621, contemporary vellum,4to, without text as issued. 43 plates + general plate of the zodiac cut and pasted on to front paper.
The first thirty-nine numbered plates each depict a fleshed-out constellation in the form laid down by Caius Julius Hyginus in the first century BC; plate 40 shows the faces of the gods representing each of the five known planets; 41 the order of the Zodiac; 42 'Lacteus', the Milky Way; and 44 the faces of the Four Seasons. All but the general chart have the monogram IDG in the bottom left corner. Pasted on the first page are the northern and southern hemispheres with their respective constellations, an astrolabe and a windrose. The second edition of this delightful celestial atlas, which was first published 1600, influencing Bayer's 'Uranometria' three years later. De Gheyn (1565-1629), an artist and engraver, also produced a famous portrait of Tycho Brahe, but is better known for his 'Maniement d'Armes', an illustrated guide to the handling of pikes, muskets, etc. WARNER: Sky Explored, p.93, wrongly described as woodcuts.
[Ref: 8273]  

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image of Cœlum Stellatum Christianum...

SCHILLER, Julius.
[Star Atlas]
Cœlum Stellatum Christianum... Augsburg, Andreas Apergerus, 1627. Oblong folio, contemporary vellum, soiled & scratched, lacking ties; engr. title, pp. (ii) + 132, lacking at least one page of tables at rear; one engr. plate listing Arabic names of the stars & 51 celestial charts.
Schiller, a lawyer not an astronomer, produced this star-atlas the year of his death. It was an attempt to replace the pagan symbolism of the constellations with Christian concepts: thus the twelve familiar signs of the Zodiac became the Twelve Apostles, and Cassiopeia became Mary Magdalene. It would be easy to dismiss the atlas as the work of a religious zealot: however it was a collaboration with Johann Bayer, updating Bayer's 'Uranometria' of 1603, improving the accuracy of the star positions. Bayer surveyed the stars, Schiller envisioned the constellations for Johann Mathias Kager to draw, and Lucas Kilian engraved the plates. Brahe & Kepler were lso on hand with advice. The result was the most accurate astronomical work available, influencing Cellarius to include two planispheres depicting the Christian constellations in his 'Harmonica Macrocosmica' in 1661. Provenance: ownership inscription of the Jesuit College of Ingolstadt, 1662; signature of L.A. Kunze on flyleaf; bookplate of Robert Honeyman IV. SNYDER: Maps of the Heavens, pp. 96-99, illus. (100-103 Cellarius' versions illus.) (STOTT: Celestial Charts pp. 76-71 Cellarius' versions illus.)
[Ref: 4599]  

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image of England Wales Scotland and Ireland Described and Abridged With ye Historie Relation of things worthy memory from a farr Larger Volume Done By John Speed.

SPEED, John.
[First Edition of the 'Miniature Speed']
England Wales Scotland and Ireland Described and Abridged With ye Historie Relation of things worthy memory from a farr Larger Volume Done By John Speed. London: George Humble, 1627, First Edition. Oblong 8vo, full contemporary calf gilt; engraved title, engraved 'Catalogue of the Shires' and 63 maps, two folding, one with some old colour. Table of maps at the rear.
Although this altlas is usually attributed to Speed, 40 of the maps are re-issues of a series engraved by Pieter van den Keere and first published c.1605, pre-dating Speed's folio atlas to qualify as the earliest atlas of the British Isles. After being used in an edition of Camden's 'Britaninia' published by Willem Blaeu in 1617, 40 of the original 44 plates were bought by George Humble, the son of one of the original publishers of Speed's 'Theatre'. He had the plates reworked, replacing the original Latin titles with English, and adding plate numbers. Dutch engravers were still needed; the engraver who added the title 'Part of Scotland it is called of the inhabitance Stranauerne with his borderers' probably wasn't familiar with written English. Humble had 23 new maps engraved, placing the maps in the same order as the 'Theatre'. The final map listed in the Table, 'Midia', was never published. SKELTON: 17.
[Ref: 4676]  

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image of Le Theatre du Monde Ou Nouvel Atlas Contenant Les Chartes et Descriptions De tous les Païsde la terre Mis en lumiere Par Guillaume et Jean Blaeu.

BLAEU, Johannes.
[A beautiful example of Blaeu's Theatrum Atlas]
Le Theatre du Monde Ou Nouvel Atlas Contenant Les Chartes et Descriptions De tous les Païsde la terre Mis en lumiere Par Guillaume et Jean Blaeu. Amsterdam, Johannes Blaeu, 1645, French edition. Original vellum gilt; with two engraved titles and 120 maps, all in original hand colour.
A fine example of a volume from a French edition of Blaeu's 'Theatrum Orbis Terrarum', with superb original hand colour. Among the maps are the classic maps of the World and Europe surrounded by vignettes, Iceland, Russia by Gerritz, Frankfurt, and folding maps of the Danube, Rhine and Lithuania. KOEMAN: Bl 19B.
[Ref: 12756]  

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image of Novus Atlas Sinensis. A Martino Martinio...

BLAEU, Johannes.
[The first Western atlas of China]
Novus Atlas Sinensis. A Martino Martinio... Amsterdam, 1654, Latin edition. Folio; rebound in contemporary full calf gilt; engr. title, pp. [xi] + 171 + (19)+ (6)(index) + xii + 33 + (3); 17 double-page maps in fine colour, blank versos as usual. Two pages of the preliminaries reinforced with archivist's tissue, some toning of text.
Blaeu's Atlas of China, the first Western atlas devoted to that country, with maps compiled by Father Martino Martini (1614-61), a Jesuit missionary. In the preface Martini claimed to have visited seven of the fifteen Chinese provinces, although he does not say which ones. His maps (a general map of China and Japan, 15 provinces and a more detailed map of Japan) were far in advance of any available in the West, and this atlas remained the standard georgraphical work on China until 1737, when D'Anville published his 'Atlas de la Chine'. KOEMAN: Bl 53, published as volume 6 of the Atlas Novus.
[Ref: 11184]  

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image of Seste deel van de Nieuwe Atlas, oft Tooneel des Aerdrijex...

BLAEU, Johannes.
[The first western atlas of China, in outstanding original colour]
Seste deel van de Nieuwe Atlas, oft Tooneel des Aerdrijex... Amsterdam, 1655, Dutch edition. First edition. Folio; full vellum gilt; pp. (iv) + 212 + (20) (Register) + xviii (Cathay) + 40 (Tartary); 2 engraved titles and 17 double-page maps, all in fine original colour. Bottom corners of titles, first map and text to page 8 repaired.
The First Edition of Blaeu's Atlas of China, the first Western atlas devoted to the country. Unusually for Blaeu atlases the maps have no text on verso. This example was published as the last of the six-volume atlas with the Latin title 'Theatrum Orbis Terrarum'. Later the maps were incorporated into the Asia volume of the ultimate Blaeu atlas, the 'Atlas Major', which was the most expensive publication of the 17th century. Blaeu used the maps of Father Martino Martini (1614-1661), a Jesuit missionary who went to China in 1643, remaining there eight years, travelling extensively and collating knowledge. He left China in 1651 to go to Rome, but, as the best available passage was with a Dutch privateer, his route included Norway, Amsterdam, Munich & Vienna. He met with scholars (finally proving that China was indeed the 'Cathay' of Marco Polo) and publishers, who wanted to publish his writings and his maps, which were far more detailed than anything previously available. The Blaeu/Martini atlas was a significant breakthrough concerning China: even in the early C20th it was called 'the most complete geographical description of China that we possess, and through which Martini has become the father of geographical learning on China.' (Ferdinand von Richthofen, 1833-1905). KOEMAN: Bl 52.
[Ref: 12129]  

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image of Uranometria, Omnium Asterismorum Continens Schemata, Nova Methodo Delineata, Aeris Laminis Expressa.

BAYER, Johann.
[Uranometria]
Uranometria, Omnium Asterismorum Continens Schemata, Nova Methodo Delineata, Aeris Laminis Expressa. Ulm: Johann Görlin, 1661. Folio, modern full calf gilt; engr. title + 51 double page celestial maps as called for, without text as usual.
First published in 1603, the 'Uranometria' (named after Urania, the Muse of Astronomy) was the first star atlas to use Greek letters to denote the apparent brightness of the stars, a system still used for stars visible to the naked eye. The work depicts the 48 Ptolemaic constellations, one per plate, and a group of twelve new constellations from the southern skys, as charted by Keyzer. Despite the second edition titlepage, the quality of the impressions of the plates suggest they were printed for the first edition but not used until later.
[Ref: 6767]  

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