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  ATLASES 
image of The London Atlas of Universal Geography, exhibiting the physical & political divisions of the various countries of the world, constructed from original materials.

ARROWSMITH, John.
[The London Atlas, with Arrowsmith's map of the Republic of Texas]
The London Atlas of Universal Geography, exhibiting the physical & political divisions of the various countries of the world, constructed from original materials. London, John Arrowsmith, 1842. Folio, modern half calf with the original morocco title label and marbled boards; engr. title, index & 66 engraved maps with original hand colour (63 double-page, 2 with folding strips, 1 folding), all tabbed at right margin with printed names for identification; some light waterstaining to contents leaf and one or two maps towards the rear of the volume.
A fine example of one of the most impressive nineteenth century English atlases, including a highly important map of the Republic of Texas. John Arrowsmith first published his Texas map on 16 November 1841, shortly after the Republic was officially recognized by Great Britain; this second state is dated 8 June 1843. It "was probably the first to show the full extent of Texas's claim to the region of the upper Rio Grande, an area included within Texas's boundaries until the Compromise of 1850... the map certainly was the best information on Texas geography available in Europe" (Martin & Martin Maps of Texas and the Southwest, 32; see also Streeter Bibliography of Texas, 1373). The ‘London Atlas' is one of the finest examples of English 19th century atlases, by one of its greatest geographers. The first edition was in 1834, with subsequent editions with title pages dated 1840, 1842 and 1858, but as Arrowsmith was continually adding new maps there is no firm collation for any edition. The contents sheet for this copy, for example, calls for fifty maps, but it has been supplemented with an additional fifteen maps bound in at the end, and an extra map of Central Africa by Stanford showing Congo Free State. The maps were also continuously updated and corrected, so that most appear in several states. The later editions of the atlas are the most valuable, as they include a larger number of maps, and many new ones of great importance, such as those in the present example on Texas and also Australia. The Library of Congress, for example, has an 1834 edition, which contains just two maps relating to Australia. This example has seven maps devoted to Australia and New Zealand, including some of the most important for that region published during the 19th century.
[Ref: 6226]  

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image of Atlas geográfico, estadístico é histórico de la República Mexicana...

GARCIA Y CUBAS, Antonio.
[The First Atlas of Mexico printed in Mexico]
Atlas geográfico, estadístico é histórico de la República Mexicana... Mexico City: printed for the Author by Jose Mariano Fernandez de Lara, 1858. Folio, rebound with original gilt-embossed morocco covers and spine laid on; title, pp. (iii), incl. list of maps, + (24) (indexes), 31 lithographed maps on thirty double-page sheets, all in fine original colour, and two plates, one coloured, as called for. Occasional age spotting, the edges of a few sheets reinforced.
A very important work, being the first atlas of Mexico to be produced in Mexico by a Mexican.. Published when Garcia y Cubas was only 26, Sabin estimates that only 300 copies were printed. There maps are one general map of Mexico with a decorative title cartouche and two composite vignette views; and another general map & 29 provinces and territories surrounded by letterpress text and tables. The two plates reproduce an Aztec text describing their settlement of the valley of Mexico City, with a commentary by Jose Fernando Ramirez of the National Museum. SABIN: 26554; PHILIPS: 2683.
[Ref: 8225]  

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image of Illustrirter Handatlas für Freunde der Erdkunde und zum Gebrauch beim unterricht. im verein mit Heinrich Leutemann...

LEEDER, Ehrenfried & SCHADE, Theodor.
[Old atlas illustrated by Heinrich Leutermann]
Illustrirter Handatlas für Freunde der Erdkunde und zum Gebrauch beim unterricht. im verein mit Heinrich Leutemann... Leipzig: F.A. Brockhaus, 1863. Folio, original half morocco with gilt-lettered boards, rebacked; pp. (86) + 22 wood-engraved maps with original hand colour.
An educational antique atlas, with the 22 coloured maps surrounded by vignettes of people, flora & fauna and other interesting features, drawn by Heinrich Leutemann (1824-1905). Leutemann illustrated a number of books on zoology and anthropology, as well as drawing a number of historical subjects.
[Ref: 12134]  

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image of Grande Atlante di Geografia Universale Statistico e Pittoresco...

MARMOCCHI, F.C.
Grande Atlante di Geografia Universale Statistico e Pittoresco... Milano, Gius. Civelli, 1871. Folio, original half morocco with gilt morocco title label on front board; title, pp. (142), text wood engravings throughout many in original hand colour, 46 steel-engraved maps in original colour.

[Ref: 8867]  

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image of The Royal Illustrated Atlas, of Modern Geography.

FULLARTON, Archibald.
[A decorative Victorian world atlas]
The Royal Illustrated Atlas, of Modern Geography. London & Edinburgh: A. Fullarton & Co, 1872. Folio, publisher's morocco, blocked in blind and gilt, gilt edges; engraved title, pp. (iv)+84+(4)+(102)(index), 76 tinted lithographic maps and plans (numbered to 74, but three numbered '25')
A fine Victorian antique atlas, a mixture of plainer double-page antique maps of countries and decorative single-page sheets with instructive vignettes ranging from wildlife to coffee porduction and city views. Many of these relate to the colonies of each European country.
[Ref: 12107]  

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  BOOKS 
image of Liber chronicarum...

SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann.
[First Edition of the Nuremberg Chronicle, with a preserved panel from the original publisher's binding, and manuscript note in Schedel's own hand]
Liber chronicarum... Nuremberg: Anton Koberger, for Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermeister, 12th July 1493. FIRST EDITION. Imperial folio (449 x 309mm), 19th century full blind stamped morocco, gilt, gauffred edges & green watered silk doublures, with an inlaid panel of stamped brown stained pigskin from the original publisher's binding designed by Wohlgemut or Pleydenwurff; 326 leaves (of 328, without the final two blank leaves), foliated (20), I-CCLXVI, (6) CCLXVII-CCXCIX, (1). (with 55/6 blank, following the unfoliated Sarmatian supplement, ff. CCLVIIII- CCLXI blank except for printed headlines.) Types: 9:165G (headlines and headings), 15:110bG (text), 64 lines and headline, table and parts of text double column. 1809 woodcut illustrations printed from 646 blocks by Michael Wohlgemut, Wilhelm Pleydenwurff and workshop. The illustrations include 29 double page town views, 8 full page cuts and double page maps of the World and Europe by Hieronymus Münzer after Nicholas Khrypffs.
The Liber Chronicarum, or Nuremberg Chronicle, was the most extensively illustrated printed book of the fifteenth century, 646 woodcuts were used to illustrate the Chronicle, but many were used more than once, so there are a total of 1,809 illustrations. It was published the year that Columbus returned to Europe after discovering America, and the woodcuts were done by Michael Wohlgemut and his stepson Wilhelm Pleydenwurff, both of whom are mentioned, very unusually, in the colophon of the work. The young Albrecht Dürer, the publisher Kolberger's godson, was apprenticed to Wolgemut from 1486-1489 and some of the plates, particularly that of the Last Judgement, have been tentatively ascribed to him. The text consists of a year-by-year account of notable events in world history from the creation down to the year of publication. It is a mixture of fact and fantasy, recording events like the invention of printing, but also repeating stories from Herodotus. Even the world map is decorated with strange beings from the far reaches, including a cyclops and a four-eyed man. The panel from the original publisher's pigskin binding, designed for the 'Liber Chronicarum' and appearing on a number of recorded copies, depicts the tree of Jesse, the root of which issues from the sleeping Jesse and contains in its branches the genealogy of Christ. In addition mounted on the xylographic title is a clipped inscription in red ink in a later fifteenth century hand, stating 'the venerable Fr Georg Pinkheimer, prior of the Carthusians at Nuremberg, gave this book to Hartmann Schedel, doctor of medicine, on the Ides of August 1496'. Schedel was an enthusiastic book collector with a large library and the inscription appears to match his hand, however, it is clear that the inscription is taken from another book as it is unlikely that Pinkheimer would have given Schedel a copy of his own book. Hartmann Schedel, a Nuremberg doctor, humanist and author of the present work, ensured its lasting importance due to the attention to and inclusion of contemporary events. Therefore he included the invention of printing, Wycliffe's heresy, and explorations in Africa and the Atlantic. The publication of this book was an enormous undertaking, requiring five years of planning and a year and a half of printing. This process is well documented due to the survival of two maquette copies, the original contract between Kolberger and his partners (Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermeister), the contract between Kolberger and the artists and other archival material in the Nuremberg Stadtbibliothek. Provenance: Dr John Bellingham Inglis; by descent to Dr C. Inglis with his bookplate to front pastedown; sold at auction in London, 11th June 1900; George Dunn of Wooley Hall with his bookplate; Cornelius J. Hauck.
[Ref: 4609]  

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image of In Somnium Scipionis...

MACROBIUS, Ambrosius.
[With an Early World Map]
In Somnium Scipionis... Lyons, Sebastian Gryphius, 1542. Small 8vo, Original Vellum Binding; pp. 567 + 73 (index); several woodcut text illustrations.Light toning and occasional foxing.
Macrobius was a Roman philosopher and geographer, AD 399-423. This work is a commentary on 'The Dream of Scipio', a section of Cicero's 'Republic' that had been lost until 1821, when a palimpsest (a used sheet of parchment that had been cleaned for reuse) was discovered with the original text still legible underneath later writing. Cicero theorised that the northern lands are balanced by a southern continent (Antipodes), which are unreachable because of the lands of fire (Perusta). The theory is illustrated with a diagrammatic world map (p.154). This clashed with the teachings of the Church, who insisted that as Bible states that the whole world was re-populated by the sons of Noah there could be no unreachable Antipodes. Macrobius's text was a standard school text throughout the Middle Ages. See SHIRLEY: World 13.
[Ref: 8681]  

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image of Itinerarium Sacrae Scripturae, Das ist:  Ein Reisebuch uber die gantze heilige Schrifft.

BÜNTING, Heinrich.
[Bünting's commentary on the Bible with his famous figurative maps]
Itinerarium Sacrae Scripturae, Das ist: Ein Reisebuch uber die gantze heilige Schrifft. Magdeburg: Paul Donat for Ambrosius Kirchners,1595, German edition. Folio, Title-page to part one printed in red and black, title-page to part II with woodcut battle scene. Contemporary blind-tooled panelled pigskin over bevelled boards, with two brass clasps; four parts in one; 9 double-page maps, 2 single page, 1 double-page plate. One map and one plate with minor repairs to edges.
A fine example of Bünting's re-imagining of the Bible as a travel book, containing three of the most famous cartographical curiosities: the 'clover-leaf' world map, with Jerusalem at the centre; Europe depicted as a Virgin Queen; and Asia depicted as Pegasus, the winged horse. Also there are more conventional maps of Africa and the Old World (although the silhouette of the European Queen can still be discerned) and other maps of the Holy Land and Egypt. SHIRLEY: World 142 & 143; NORWICH: Africa 17; MCC 1: Geographical Oddities 2 & 3.
[Ref: 16606]  

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image of Le Relationi Universali di Giovanni Botero Benese Divise In Quattro Parti.

BOTERO, Giovanni.
[Botero's Geography]
Le Relationi Universali di Giovanni Botero Benese Divise In Quattro Parti. Venice, Niccolo Polo, 1597 & Giacomo Vincenti, 1598. Large 8vo, later half calf with marbled boards, rubbed; Four parts in one: pp. (xxxii)+240+80; (xxii)+152; 183+(7); (xvi)+79. With four engraved maps of the continents, all with slight damp stains, Africa and America with an old repaired tear each.
Botero (1540-1617), was a Piedmontese priest, geographer and Secretary to the Duke of Savoy. His text on geography was regarded as the best for over a century, with 17 editions in its first ten years. It was more than just a geography, as Botero also discussed political history and economics. The four maps, modelled on Ortelius, are all of a second state, with the name 'Poro' engraved lower left. This is believed to be the signature of Girolamo Poro, the engraver. BURDEN: 86; Betz 32.
[Ref: 11048]  

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image of Specula physico-mathematico-historica notabilium ac mirabilium sciendorum in qua Mundi Mirabilis Œconomia...

ZAHN, Johann.
[A Fine Cosmography]
Specula physico-mathematico-historica notabilium ac mirabilium sciendorum in qua Mundi Mirabilis Œconomia... Nuremberg: J.C.Lochner, 1696. 3 vols in two, folio, contemporary speckled calf, gilt spines in compartments; pp. [xl]+448 + [7]; [xxiv]+460+[8]; [xvi]+248 (lacking N2-3)+[8]. With 3 engr. frontispieces, portrait, 54 engr. plates (26 folding), 16 folding tables.
A finely illustrated cosmography, written by a German monk. Cartographic plates include maps of the Solar System, a pair of Celestials, the sun, moon & Venus, the world and Mediterreanean showing sea currents, a pair of hemispheres and an ornate wind rose. Zoological plates include illustrations of seamonsters, demons, mermen, unicorns and bizarre breeds of men. Johann Zahn (1631-1707) also published a book on optics, 'Oculus Artificialis Teledioptricus Sive Telescopium' (1685), with extensive descriptions of both the camera obscura and the magic lantern, which he used for anatomical lectures. SHIRLEY: World 583 & 584, "engravings of a high standard"; WARNER: Sky Explorerd p.267.
[Ref: 5993]  

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