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[A rare map of Russia, known through only a handful of examples]

image of Anthonius Wied candido lectori S.  Moscovia quae & Alba Russia non contenta Europae Sarmatiae parte... Franciscus Hogenb: ex vero sculpsit 1570.

image of Anthonius Wied candido lectori S.  Moscovia quae & Alba Russia non contenta Europae Sarmatiae parte... Franciscus Hogenb: ex vero sculpsit 1570.

image of Anthonius Wied candido lectori S.  Moscovia quae & Alba Russia non contenta Europae Sarmatiae parte... Franciscus Hogenb: ex vero sculpsit 1570.


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WIED, Anton.
Anthonius Wied candido lectori S. Moscovia quae & Alba Russia non contenta Europae Sarmatiae parte... Franciscus Hogenb: ex vero sculpsit 1570. Cologne: Frans Hogenberg, 1570. Original colour. 345 x 480mm. A superb example in fine original colour.
A map of Moscovy after Anton Wied, orientated with north to the left, engraved by Frans Hogenberg in 1570. His source was a six-sheet by Anton Weid (Oberwesel c.1500 - 1558 Gdansk) and Ivan Lyatsky, compiled in 1542 and published 1555, possibly engraved by Mercator, now lost. Munster also published a basic woodcut map from Wied's manuscript, 1544. Frans Hogenberg (c.1538-90) was one of the most significant map engravers of the period, renowned for his work not only with Abraham Ortelius for the 'Theatrum Orbis Terrarum' atlas (1570) but also for his own 'Civitates Orbis Terrarum', an atlas of town plans he published with Georg Braun. The style is consistent with the style of Hogenberg's work for Ortelius and Karrow suggests it was engraved for the 'Theatrum', but either Ortelius preferred the map by Jenkinson or the plate was not finished in time for the first edition. As Hogenberg also engraved the Jenkinson map it is more likely that it was chosen because it included areas of Central Asia not on other maps in the atlas. Wied's 'Moscovia' covers a much smaller area than Jenkinson's 'Russiae', with Wiborg in the west, the White Sea in the north, the Black Sea in the South and going no further east than the Urals and Caspian Sea, whereas the latter marks Bohara, Sarmarkand and Tashkent. Some of Wied's geography is distorted: for example Kiev is marked by the text cartouche bottom right, far to the west of the Black Sea and not connected to it by the Dnieper. The vignette scenes are smaller, as there are fewer gaps to fill. Both maps have a vignette of the Slavic goddess Zlatá Baba, although Wied names her in Cyrillic script, an uncommon usage in this period. Other vignettes include Tartar tents, bear-hunting and an illustration of a wolverine ('Rossomaka'). Offshore is a bizarre winged dragon-fish. In 1889 Nordenskiöld wrote that only two examples of Hogenberg's map were known, one in the British Museum, the other belonging to Dr Michow of Hamburg. It is probable that Nordenskiöld purchased Michow's, as there is now an example in his collection in the National Library of Finland. In 1993 Karrow listed three more institutional examples, in Germany and Switzerland. NORDENSKIÖLD: Facsimile-Atlas (1889-1973), p.114b; KARROW: Mapmakers of the Sixteenth Century and Their Maps, 81/1.3.
[Ref: 14905]