Stock Id :21868

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The first printed map of Pembrokeshire

SAXTON, Christopher.

Penbrok comitat qui inter meridionales cambriae ptes hodie censetur olim demetia. L Dyfet B hoc est occidentalis wallia descriptio An.o D.ni 1578.
London, 1579. Original colour. 360 x 470mm, sheet with grapes watermark.

SMall hole in sea area.

The first published state of Saxton's map of Pembrokeshire, the first time the county had been represented on a printed map. It was engraved in 1578 and issued in Christopher Saxton's county atlas the following year, less than 50 years after Wales was officially incorporated into the Kingdom of Henry III by the 1536 Act of Union. The map has a large title cartouche top right featuring Elizabeth I's royal arms, a scale cartouche with Saxton's name and the arms of Thomas Seckford, Elizabeth's Master of Requests, bottom left. The towns represented by multiple buildings are 'Tenbye', 'Herford' (Haverfordwest), 'Penbroke', St Davids, 'Fishcard', Newport and St Davids. Despite being recognised as an important harbour in Tudor times, Milford Haven is not named, although Pill Priory is marked, although it has been suppressed in 1536.
It was William Cecil, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I's Secretary of State, who determined that England and Wales should be mapped properly, and Seckford who financed Saxton's work. Saxton was also issued with a Royal Warrant obliging Welsh officials to provide him with Welsh-speaking guides. The resulting surveys were the basis of county mapping until the middle of the 18th century, copied for Camden's 'Britannia' and the atlases of Speed, Blome and Morden. The printing plates also had a long lifespan: after being eclipsed by John Speed's atlas of 1611, the plates were re-engraved and re-issued in 1642 by William Web; most of the other plates were still being printed as late as 1770.


Stock ID : 21868

£3,500

£3,500

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INDEX

Stock Id :21868

Download Image

The first printed map of Pembrokeshire

SAXTON, Christopher.

Penbrok comitat qui inter meridionales cambriae ptes hodie censetur olim demetia. L Dyfet B hoc est occidentalis wallia descriptio An.o D.ni 1578.
London, 1579. Original colour. 360 x 470mm, sheet with grapes watermark.

SMall hole in sea area.

The first published state of Saxton's map of Pembrokeshire, the first time the county had been represented on a printed map. It was engraved in 1578 and issued in Christopher Saxton's county atlas the following year, less than 50 years after Wales was officially incorporated into the Kingdom of Henry III by the 1536 Act of Union. The map has a large title cartouche top right featuring Elizabeth I's royal arms, a scale cartouche with Saxton's name and the arms of Thomas Seckford, Elizabeth's Master of Requests, bottom left. The towns represented by multiple buildings are 'Tenbye', 'Herford' (Haverfordwest), 'Penbroke', St Davids, 'Fishcard', Newport and St Davids. Despite being recognised as an important harbour in Tudor times, Milford Haven is not named, although Pill Priory is marked, although it has been suppressed in 1536.
It was William Cecil, Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I's Secretary of State, who determined that England and Wales should be mapped properly, and Seckford who financed Saxton's work. Saxton was also issued with a Royal Warrant obliging Welsh officials to provide him with Welsh-speaking guides. The resulting surveys were the basis of county mapping until the middle of the 18th century, copied for Camden's 'Britannia' and the atlases of Speed, Blome and Morden. The printing plates also had a long lifespan: after being eclipsed by John Speed's atlas of 1611, the plates were re-engraved and re-issued in 1642 by William Web; most of the other plates were still being printed as late as 1770.


Stock ID : 21868

£3,500

£3,500

Return To Listing