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Records: 1 to 10 of 218
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  GLOBES 

NEWTON & Son. [A handsome pair of floor-standing library globes]
Newton's New & Improved Terrestrial Globe Embracing every recent Discovery. [&] Newton's New & Improved Celestial Globe On which all the Stars, Nebulæ & Clusters contained in the extensive Catalogue of the late F.Wellaston are accurately laid down... London, Newton & Son, 1842.
Pair of 12' (30cm) diameter globes, each standing 90cm high, with a single pedestal stand with three legs, with four quarter circles supporting the horizon ring. Each globe has 2 sets of twelve copper-engraved half gores, coloured and varnished. The meridian rings are brass, as are the English-style hour circles between the meridians and the globes. The horizon rings are also copper-engraved and varnished.
[Ref: 8521]    £29,000.00 including VAT ($39,208 • €32,292 rates)


WYLD, James. [An English mid-Victorian table globe]
A Terrestrial Globe Compiled from the latest & Most Authentic Sources, Including all the recent Geographical Discoveries. London, c.1870. Printed globe, 12" diameter (305mm), on three-legged, wooden stand, brass meridian and horizon with engraved paper calendar and zodiac, total height 18" (460mm), A few small signs of wear.
A fine table globe, marking James Clark Ross's discoveries in Antarctica (1841), 'The United States of Colombia' (1861-88) and Alaska as part of the United States (1867).
[Ref: 17297]    £7,000.00 including VAT ($9,464 • €7,795 rates)


BETTS, John. [A collapsible globe]
Betts's Portable Terrestrial Globe Compiled from the Latest and Best Authorities. British Empire coloured red. London, George Philip & Son Ltd, & Liverpool, Philip Son & Nephew, c.1925. Printed waxed cotton globe with 'umbrella ' mechanism, metal spindle and hanging ring. Globe circumference 1,260mm extended, 770mm long including spindle. With the original cardboard tube with printed cover. Some faint staining.
An unusual collapsible globe, made spherical by pushing a metal tube upwards along the spindle, It shows the British Empire covering approximately a quarter of the Earth's total land area, with a population of 450 million people. The globe's mechanism was invented by John Betts in 1860; this example is a later issue by G. Philip & Sons who manufactured them after Bett's death c. 1863 to c. 1925. We have estimated the date of this example by the description of St Petersburg as 'Petrograd (Leningrad)' (renamed by the Soviets in 1924), and the separation of Transjordan from Palestine (1922) but before full independence from the British (1928). Undoubtedly the reason for the superb condition of this globe is the original cardboard tube.
[Ref: 16071]    £2,250.00 including VAT ($3,042 • €2,505 rates)


TRIPENSEE PLANETARIUM COMPANY. [A 1930s model of the Earth's rotation around the Sun]
[Tellurian.] Saginaw, Michigan, c.1930. Tellurian, with Bakelite Sun, arm and base (with iron weight), Earth with paper gores, wooden Moon and Venus, chain mechanism, compass on arm. Earth, Moon and Venus with signs of wear.
A tellurian, an instrument that demonstrates the movement of the Earth around the Sun, how the seasons result from the tilt of the earth, and how the Earth's rotation on its axis cause night and day. The movements of the Moon and Venus also feature in the mechanism.
[Ref: 16927]    £2,200.00 including VAT ($2,974 • €2,450 rates)


SUMIRA, Sylvia. The Art and History of Globes. A profusely-illustrated guide to old globes New.
A well-written guide to globes, with detailed descriptions of examples from 1492 to the end of the nineteenth century.
[Ref: 14996]    £30.00 including VAT ($41 • €33 rates)


  WORLD 
 World & Continent Sets 

CLOPPENBURG, Johannes. [The World and Continents from Cloppenburg's 'Atlas Minor']
Typus Orbis Terrarum; America noviter delineata; Asia; Nova Europae Descriptio; Africæ nova Tabula. Amsterdam, 1632, Latin text edition. Coloured. Five plates, Each c.190 x 260mm. Worm hole in right edge filled on all plates, otherwise a very fine set with dark impression.
Scarce miniature versions of maps of the world and four continents by Jodocus Hondius. They appeared in Cloppenburg's edition of Mercator's 'Atlas Minor', with maps engraved in slightly larger format than standard Dutch pocket atalses by Pieter van den Keere. The borders of the continents are unillustrated, but the world has the Four Elements represented by a cornucopia, bird of paradise, salamander and a sea monster in the corners, two scenes from the Garden of Eden in the upper cusp and the Last Judgement below. First published in 1630, there was a third edition in 1636 before a hiatus until an edition in 1673, suggesting the plates were supressed. BURDEN: 225, first state of three.
This item is currently on reserve


 World Maps 

FORESTI, Giacomo. [An early 16th century T-O World Map.]
[Untitled T-O world map.] Venice: c.1503. Woodcut, 90 x 130mm, set in Italian text.
An early diagrammatic world map from Foresti da Bergamo's 'Novissime Hystoriae', in a decorative border also containing a climate map. The depiction is 'Tripartite' or 'T-O', with the world divided into three by great waterways. Europe is separated from Africa by the Mediterranean and from Asia by the river Don; and Asia and Africa are separated by the Nile. Foresti was a noted historian in his day: his 'Supplementum Chronicarum' (1491), was plagarised by Hartmann Schedel, appearing word for word in the more famous 'Nuremberg Chronicle' (1493). SHIRLEY: p.xx, plate 2.
This item is currently on reserve


Anonymous. [Medieval woodblock T-O world map]
[Untitled circular world map from a woodblock of 1491.] Paris, Nicolas Couteau, 1543. Woodblock, two sheets joined. Circular map, diameter 300mm, letterpress in borders. A fine example.
A scarce circular woodblock world map, first issued in the 1491 edition of 'La Mer des Hystoires', published in Lyon. It follows the T-O format with east at the top of the map, so Asia filling the top half, Africa bottom right and Europe bottom left, with Jerusalem at the centre. The map shows different countries and cities as hills or islands, with the Pope shown behind the walls of the Vatican and England and Ireland on the edge just left of the centre. Other vignettes include the Devil, the Tree of the Sun and the Moon, dragons and a phoenix. 'La Mer des Hystoires' was a French translation of the ' Rudimentum Novitiorum', 1475, an encyclopaedic world history based on medieval theology, which contained the first detailed maps ever printed, pre-dating the illustrated editions of Ptolemy. Although this map is smaller than the 1475 original a number of mistakes were corrected and the text is much clearer than in the previous editions. Campbell calls it 'the work of a thinking individual'. SHIRLEY: Mapping of the World, 17.
This item is currently on reserve


FRISIUS, Gemma. [An uncommon cordiform world map with wind heads]
Mappa mundi, oft generael Carte der Werelt... Antwerp, c.1553. Woodcut, sheet 230 x 295mm. Narrow margins, repair in bottom margin.
An unusual woodcut world map, prepared by Frisius for inclusion in Peter Apian's Cosmography. Three very similar versions of the block have been identified: this is the second, used 1553-1584, but this edition is Dutch, so is either 1553, 1561 or 1564. North America is shown as a narrow peninsula named 'Baccalearum', a reference to the cod fishing that was already so important. In the seas, ships, seamonsters and a mermaid are shown. The border of the map contains the signs of the Zodiac, outside which are a number of wind-heads, including three skulls blowing from the south. Above the two maps are a pair of god-like figures, one of whom has the double-headed eagle of the Holy Roman Emperor on his breastplate. SHIRLEY: 82 (see 96 & 131 for further details).
[Ref: 17820]    £2,400.00 ($3,245 • €2,672 rates)


VISSCHER, Claes Janszoon. [A world map with portraits of the Twelve Cæsars]
Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula. Amsterdam, 1652. Original colour. 445 x 560mm. Minor restoration to margin and centre fold.
This magnificent planisphere manages to include 30 separate illustrations in its panels. Along the top and bottom are equestrian portraits of the Twelve Cæsars of Tacitus. The four corners feature female allegorical figures of the Continents, with Europe as a shepherdess, Asia seated on a camel, Africa on a crocodile and America on an armadillo! The left border has prospects of Rome, Amsterdam, Jerusalem and Tunis, interspersed with illustrations of European, Asian and African dress. The right border is given over completely to America: the prospects of Mexico City, Havana, Pernambuco and Todos os Santos Bay are separated by vignettes of North American natives, South Americans and the giants of the Magellan Strait. Originally published in 1639, most of the cartography has been copied from Blaeu, although Arctic America has been extended, as has the St Lawrence River. This state has the date 1652, the year of Visscher's death, added. SHIRLEY: 350.
[Ref: 17720]    £20,000.00 ($27,040 • €22,270 rates)


Records: 1 to 10 of 218
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