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  BOOKS 

SCHEDEL, D. Hartmann. [First Edition of the Nuremberg Chronicle, with a preserved panel from the original publisher's binding, and manuscript note in Schedel's own hand]
Liber chronicarum... Nuremberg: Anton Koberger, for Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermeister, 12th July 1493. FIRST EDITION. Imperial folio (449 x 309mm), 19th century full blind stamped morocco, gilt, gauffred edges & green watered silk doublures, with an inlaid panel of stamped brown stained pigskin from the original publisher's binding designed by Wohlgemut or Pleydenwurff; 326 leaves (of 328, without the final two blank leaves), foliated (20), I-CCLXVI, (6) CCLXVII-CCXCIX, (1). (with 55/6 blank, following the unfoliated Sarmatian supplement, ff. CCLVIIII- CCLXI blank except for printed headlines.) Types: 9:165G (headlines and headings), 15:110bG (text), 64 lines and headline, table and parts of text double column. 1809 woodcut illustrations printed from 646 blocks by Michael Wohlgemut, Wilhelm Pleydenwurff and workshop. The illustrations include 29 double page town views, 8 full page cuts and double page maps of the World and Europe by Hieronymus Münzer after Nicholas Khrypffs.
The Liber Chronicarum, or Nuremberg Chronicle, was the most extensively illustrated printed book of the fifteenth century, 646 woodcuts were used to illustrate the Chronicle, but many were used more than once, so there are a total of 1,809 illustrations. It was published the year that Columbus returned to Europe after discovering America, and the woodcuts were done by Michael Wohlgemut and his stepson Wilhelm Pleydenwurff, both of whom are mentioned, very unusually, in the colophon of the work. The young Albrecht Dürer, the publisher Kolberger's godson, was apprenticed to Wolgemut from 1486-1489 and some of the plates, particularly that of the Last Judgement, have been tentatively ascribed to him. The text consists of a year-by-year account of notable events in world history from the creation down to the year of publication. It is a mixture of fact and fantasy, recording events like the invention of printing, but also repeating stories from Herodotus. Even the world map is decorated with strange beings from the far reaches, including a cyclops and a four-eyed man. The panel from the original publisher's pigskin binding, designed for the 'Liber Chronicarum' and appearing on a number of recorded copies, depicts the tree of Jesse, the root of which issues from the sleeping Jesse and contains in its branches the genealogy of Christ. In addition mounted on the xylographic title is a clipped inscription in red ink in a later fifteenth century hand, stating 'the venerable Fr Georg Pinkheimer, prior of the Carthusians at Nuremberg, gave this book to Hartmann Schedel, doctor of medicine, on the Ides of August 1496'. Schedel was an enthusiastic book collector with a large library and the inscription appears to match his hand, however, it is clear that the inscription is taken from another book as it is unlikely that Pinkheimer would have given Schedel a copy of his own book. Hartmann Schedel, a Nuremberg doctor, humanist and author of the present work, ensured its lasting importance due to the attention to and inclusion of contemporary events. Therefore he included the invention of printing, Wycliffe's heresy, and explorations in Africa and the Atlantic. The publication of this book was an enormous undertaking, requiring five years of planning and a year and a half of printing. This process is well documented due to the survival of two maquette copies, the original contract between Kolberger and his partners (Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermeister), the contract between Kolberger and the artists and other archival material in the Nuremberg Stadtbibliothek. Provenance: Dr John Bellingham Inglis; by descent to Dr C. Inglis with his bookplate to front pastedown; sold at auction in London, 11th June 1900; George Dunn of Wooley Hall with his bookplate; Cornelius J. Hauck.
[Ref: 4609]    £85,000.00 ($107,950 • €96,560 rates)


  WORLD 
 World Maps 

HONDIUS, Henricus. ['A fine ornate example of the decorative cartography of the time']
Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica Ac Hydrographica Tabula. Auct Henr. Hondio. Amsterdam, Jan Jansson, 1641-, Latin text edition. Fine original colour. 380 x 540mm. Minor repairs on verso to verdigris weaknesses.
A striking example of the first world map to appear in an atlas showing California as an island and, according to Schiller, 'the oldest dated map in an atlas on which a Dutch discovery in Australia has been shown'. The Cape York Peninsula is shown with eight names. The decoration on the map is superb: three strapwork cartouches appear on the map; portraits of Julius Cæsar, Ptolemy, Mercator and Jodocus Hondius fill the corners; scenes representing the four Elements are above and below each hemisphere ; in the upper cusp is a celestial globe; and in the lower cusp are allegorical figures representing Asia, America and Africa making obeisance to Europe. KOEMAN: 51A; SCHILDER: Australia Unveiled, 39; SHIRLEY: 336, 'a fine ornate example of the decorative cartography of the time'.
[Ref: 16889]    £14,000.00 ($17,780 • €15,904 rates)


NOLIN, Jean Baptiste. [A double-hemisphere wall map with side panels]
Le Globe Terrestre Represente en Deux Plans-Hemispheres Dressé Sur la Projection de M.r de la Hyre de l'Academie Royale des Sciences... Paris, Crepy, 1767. Coloured. 1190 x 1500mm. Minor restoration, as is usual in these large wall maps.
A four-sheet map of the world, presented as a pair of hemispheres held aloft by allegorical figures of the Four Seasons. The added borders containing vignette scenes from the Old Testament, including the expulsion of Adam and Eve from Paradise, Cain and Abel, Noah's Ark and the Ten Commandments. According to a small text the decorations were drawn and engraved by Bocquet from Nolin's ideas. The map, published only a couple of years before Captain Cook's first voyage, still shows only a partial outline of New Zealand and an unbroken Australian coastline joining Tasmania to New Guinea. In North America the 'Strait of Anian' forms a North West Passage from Hudson's Bay, and the St Lawrence River continues west from Lake Superior. SHIRLEY: World 605, 'one of the finest Large-scale world maps to be produced '
[Ref: 15148]   P.O.A.


 Polar Maps 

BERTIUS, Petrus. [Arctic]
[Regiones Hyperboreæ.] Amsterdam, Jodocus Hondius jnr, 1616. 95 x 120mm.
The Arctic Circle, published in Hondius's revised version of Bertius's 'Tabularum Geographicarum Contractarum', probably engraved by Hondius himself. It is derived from Mercator's folio map of 1585 (the 1606 state with Nova Zembla now a single, incomplete island), but has new borders of arctic animals rather than roundel maps. BURDEN: 184; KOEMAN: Lan 11a.
[Ref: 10130]    £420.00 ($533 • €477 rates)


KEIZER, Jacob. [The North Pole, with California as an Island]
De Noord Pool. De Eilanden van Sangir Sjauw en Pagasare. Amsterdam: Jan de Lat, c.1747. Original outline colour. 190 x 280mm.
A scarce Dutch map with the North Pole featuring California as an Island. The inset map shows the volcanic islands of the Sangihe Archipelago in Indonesia
[Ref: 17249]    £300.00 ($381 • €341 rates)


  AMERICA 
 North America 

RABATTA, Augusto & BAILOU, Jean Baptist de. [An 18th century playing-card map of North America]
America Settentrionale. Florence: Aniello Lamberti, 1779. Original colour. Sheet size 110 x 65mm.
A rare miniature map of North America, engraved by Lamberti for the 'Minchiate', the Florentine version of the Tarot, which had each card marked with an arcane symbol. The full set was published in Augusto Da Rabatta and Jean Baptiste De Baillou's pocket atlas 'Nuovo Atlante Generale'. Information on the map is minimal, but an extensive key gives the names of the various regions and their principal cities. Also shown is the ficticious North-West Passage.
[Ref: 12957]    £600.00 ($762 • €682 rates)


RABATTA, Augusto & BAILOU, Jean Baptist de. [An 18th century playing-card map of the North West Passage & Bering Straits]
Nuovo sistema combinate dalle Scoperto de Russi dell'Ammiraglia della Fonte, di M. Delisle ed altri per le Parti Nord Ouest dell'America, e Nord Est dell'Asia approvato dalla Reale Accademia dell Sceinzxe di Parigi. Florence: Aniello Lamberti, 1779. Original colour. Sheet size 115 x 75mm.
A rare miniature showing two maps, the ficticious North West Passage and the the Bering Straits. Engraved by Lamberti for the 'Minchiate', the Florentine version of the Tarot, which had each card marked with an arcane symbol. The full set was published in Augusto Da Rabatta and Jean Baptiste De Baillou's pocket atlas 'Nuovo Atlante Generale'. Information on the map is minimal, but an extensive key gives the names of the various regions. These were printed in the year that Cook entered the Bering Straits.
[Ref: 12995]    £650.00 ($826 • €738 rates)


ROBERT DE VAUGONDY, Didier. [An early examination of comparative cartography of North America]
[Recueil de 10 Cartes Traitant Particulierement de L'Amerique du Nord.] Paris, Diderot, 1779. Folio, modern half calf gilt; 10 numbered folding maps as called for.
The complete set of ten maps compiled by Didier Robert de Vaugondy from different souces (including the Russians and Japanese) and published in a supplement to Denis Diderot's monumental 'Encyclopédie, ou dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers'. The maps compare the different published versions of the cartography of North America, the North Pacific and Bering Strait, and north-east Asia. Shown on these maps are many myths and falsehoods: California as an island; the kingdoms of Anian and Quivira; Jesso or Ezo above Japan; the Mer de l'Ouest; and the fictitious discoveries of 'Bartholomew de Font', including the North West Passage. Most of these theories were cast aside at the end of the decade, with news of Captain Cook's Third Voyage (1776-80), which mapped the North Pacific in far better detail. However this work remains important as one of the first studies of comparative cartography.
[Ref: 9292]    £1,650.00 ($2,096 • €1,874 rates)


CARY, John. [Detailed map of North America in the early 19th century]
A New Map of North America from the Latest Authorities. London, 1811. Original body colour. 525 x 600mm.
A colourful map of North America published the year before Britain and the USA fought the War of 1812. Although the Eastern Seaboard is shown in great detail, this peters out between the Mississippi and the west coast discoveries of George Vancouver, although the line of the Rockies (here the 'Stony Mountains') is marked. In the Arctic Ocean the mouths of the Mckenzie and Coppermine Rivers are marked, but between them and Baffin Bay the landmass is left vague. Across Greenland is 'Fin Whale Strait', a remnant of the erroneous 'Frobisher's Strait'.
[Ref: 17362]    £450.00 ($572 • €511 rates)


 Western USA 

DONCKER, Hendrik. [First state of Doncker's chart of California as an island]
Pascaart vertoonende de Zeecusten van Chile, Peru, Hispania Nova, Nova Granada, en California. Amsterdam, 1659. Original colour with later additions, with gold highlights. 435 x 540mm. A fine example.
The first state of this impressive chart of the west coast of America, which was updated the following year to show the Caribbean coast of Central America. Orientated with north to the left, it shows from a promontory called 'Aguebela de Cato' just north of California south to near Arica in Chile. However it is for its representation of California that this chart is so important, as it 'depicts California as an island on a larger scale than any earlier sea chart' (Burden). Insets show two other great cartographical mysteries: the partial outline of Tasmania, according to Tasman; and the mythical island of Yedso to the north of Japan. A third insert shows the islands around the Ladrones. See KOEMAN Don 2 for the first atlas issue, in 'De Zee Atlas Of Water-Waerelt...'
[Ref: 11230]    £2,200.00 ($2,794 • €2,499 rates)


Records: 1 to 10 of 33
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