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Records: 51 to 54 of 54
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  DECORATIVE 
 Decorative Items 

Anonymous. [A satirical map on the Mississippi Bubble]
Afbeeldinge Van't Zeer Vermaarde Eiland Geks-Kop. Amsterdam, 1720, 290 x 230mm. Trimmed close to neatline, bottom right corner repaired.
A map of the island of "Geks-Kop" (fools cap) from "Het Groote Tafereel Der Dwaasheid" (The Great Mirror Of Folly). The title translates as "A representation of the very famous island of Mad-head, lying in the sea of shares, discovered by Mr. Law-rens, and inhabited by a collection of all kinds of people, to whom are given the general name shareholders". At the center of the image is a map of an island depicted as the head of a Fool wearing his traditional cap; the place names include Blind Fort, Bubble River, and Mad House, surrounded by the islets of Poverty, Sorrow, and Despair. Around the map are scenes including a crowd stoning the headquarters of the Compagnie and a creditor fleeing his investors in a land-yacht. This satirical engraving of the Mississippi Bubble is one of the most famous cartographic curiosities. It represents the collapse of the French Compagnie de la Louisiane d'Occident, founded by the Scottish financier John Law in 1717, which was granted control of Louisiana. Its plans to exploit the resources of the region (the 'Mississippi Scheme') captured the popular imagination and people rushed to invest: share prices opened at 500 livres, but rapidly rose to 18,000 livres. At this point speculators indulged in profit-taking, causing a run on the shares. Confidence collapsed, causing a run on the company's capital and the company went bankrupt, ruining many, not only in France, but throughout Europe. As a consequence of this failure, confidence in many colonial schemes collapsed, forcing many companies into bankruptcy, including the English South Sea Company and a number in the Netherlands, prompting this satire.
[Ref: 10616]    £750.00 ($953 • €852 rates)


Anonymous. [C18th armillary sphere]
The Artificial Sphere. London, c.1750. Coloured. 190 x 125mm.
An armillary sphere within an ornate border.
[Ref: 10254]    £90.00 ($114 • €102 rates)


Anonymous. [An Italian Serio-Comic map of Europe during the Great War]
L'Europa nel 1915. Milan: Luigi Ronchi di Candido Varoli, 1915. Chromolithograph, sheet 450 x 650mm. Binding folds reinforced, small repairs.
An Italian satirical map of Europe, with caricatures for the countries at war. France is a cockerel pecking the nose of the German dachshund, whose picklehelm is being punched by a long-legged British sailor. Austria howls with pain as its hind leg is crushed by the Russian steamroller driven by a grinning polar bear, and he is stabbed in the back by a Serbian bayonet. Partly based on the 'Hark Hark' map by Johnson Riddle, this version seems to date to before the Treaty of London brought Italy into the war in May 1915; a later version has the placid Italian shown here clubbing the Austrian dog with the butt of his rifle. See SOUCACOS: Satirical Maps p.216-7 for later issue.
[Ref: 17606]    £5,000.00 ($6,350 • €5,680 rates)


Anonymous. [A socialist protest poster after the 1974 military coup in Portugal]
Il Portogallo non sara' il Chile d'Europa. Italian, c.1974. Lithograph, printed in black and red. Sheet 410 x 305mm.
A poster with the head of a soldier wearing a helmet, his face made from a map of Portugal. Above is the anti-fascist slogan 'Portugal will not be the Chile of Europe'; this was the slogan of the 'Carnation Revolution' which overthrew the authoritarian regime of the Estado Novo in April 1974. The hope was that the coup wasn't going to emulate Augusto Pinochet's coup of 1973, which saw a thousand executions in the first six months, the abolition of civil liberties and 500% inflation in the first year. Instead Portugal evolved into a democratic country.
[Ref: 17591]    £900.00 ($1,143 • €1,022 rates)


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